ROLAND XV-88 (01) PDF MANUAL


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PDF Content Summary: OWNER’S MANUAL Thank you, and congratulations on your choice of the Roland XV-88 128-Voice Expandable Synthesizer. Before using this unit, carefully read the sections entitled: “IMPORTANT SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS” (Owner’s manual p. 2), “USING THE UNIT SAFELY” (Owner’s manual p. 3), and “IMPORTANT NOTES” (Owner’s manual p. 5). These sections provide important information concerning the proper operation of the unit. Additionally, in order to feel assured that you have gained a good grasp of every feature provided by your new unit, Quick start, Owner’s manual, and Q & A should be read in its entirety. The manual should be saved and kept on hand as a convenient reference. * Windows is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation. * Apple is a registered trademark of Apple Computer, Inc. * Macintosh is a registered trademark of Apple Computer, Inc. * IBM is a registered trademark of International Business Machines Corporation. * IBM PC is a registered trademark of International Business Machines Corporation. * SmartMedia is a trademark of Toshiba Corporation. Copyright © 2000 ROLAND CORPORATION All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form without the written permission of ROLAND CORPORATION. The lightning flash with arrowhead symbol, within an equilateral triangle, is intended to alert the user to the presence of uninsulated “dangerous voltage” within the product’s enclosure that may be of sufficient magnitude to constitute a risk of electric shock to persons. The exclamation point within an equilateral triangle is intended to alert the user to the presence of important operating and maintenance (servicing) instructions in the literature accompanying the product. INSTRUCTIONS PERTAINING TO A RISK OF FIRE, ELECTRIC SHOCK, OR INJURY TO PERSONS. IMPORTANT SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS SAVE THESE INSTRUCTIONS WARNING - When using electric products, basic precautions should always be followed, including the following: Read all the instructions before using the product. Do not use this product near water — for example, near a bathtub, washbowl, kitchen sink, in a wet basement, or near a swimming pool, or the like. This product should be used only with a cart or stand that is recommended by the manufacturer. This product, either alone or in combination with an amplifier and headphones or speakers, may be capable of producing sound levels that could cause permanent hearing loss. Do not operate for a long period of time at a high volume level or at a level that is uncomfortable. If you experience any hearing loss or ringing in the ears, you should consult an audiologist. The product should be located so that its location or position does not interfere with its proper ventilation. The product should be located away from heat sources such as radiators, heat registers, or other products that produce heat. The product should be connected to a power supply only of the type described in the operating instructions or as marked on the product. CAUTION RISK OF DO ELECTRIC NOT OPEN SHOCK ATTENTION: RISQUE DE CHOC ELECTRIQUE NE PAS OUVRIR CAUTION: TO REDUCE THE RISK OF ELECTRIC SHOCK, DO NOT REMOVE COVER (OR BACK). NO USER-SERVICEABLE PARTS INSIDE. REFER SERVICING TO QUALIFIED SERVICE PERSONNEL. 1.2.3.4.5.6.7. 8.9.10. 11.The power-supply cord of the product should be unplugged from the outlet when left unused for a long period of time. Care should be taken so that objects do not fall and liquids are not spilled into the enclosure through openings. The product should be serviced by qualified service personnel when: A.The power-supply cord or the plug has been damaged; or B.Objects have fallen, or liquid has been spilled into the product; or C.The product has been exposed to rain; or D.The product does not appear to operate normally or exhibits a marked change in performance; or E.The product has been dropped, or the enclosure damaged. Do not attempt to service the product beyond that described in the user-maintenance instructions. All other servicing should be referred to qualified service personnel. IMPORTANT: THE WIRES IN THIS MAINS LEAD ARE COLOURED IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE FOLLOWING CODE. BLUE: BROWN: As the colours of the wires in the mains lead of this apparatus may not correspond with the coloured markings identifying the terminals in your plug, proceed as follows: The wire which is coloured BLUE must be connected to the terminal which is marked with the letter N or coloured BLACK. The wire which is coloured BROWN must be connected to the terminal which is marked with the letter L or coloured RED. Under no circumstances must either of the above wires be connected to the earth terminal of a three pin plug. For the USA For Canada 2 This product may be equipped with a polarized line plug (one blade wider than the other) . This is a safety feature. If you are unable to insert the plug into the outlet, contact an electrician to replace your obsolete outlet. Do not defeat the safety purpose of the plug. For Polarized Line Plug CAUTION: TO PREVENT ELECTRIC SHOCK, MATCH WIDE BLADE OF PLUG TO WIDE SLOT, FULLY INSERT. ATTENTION: POUR ÉVITER LES CHOCS ÉLECTRIQUES, INTRODUIRE LA LAME LA PLUS LARGE DE LA FICHE DANS LA BORNE CORRESPONDANTE DE LA PRISE ET POUSSER JUSQU' AU FOND. For the U.K. NEUTRAL LIVE 001 • Before using this unit, make sure to read the instructions below, and the Owner’s Manual. .......................................................................................................... 002b • Do not open or perform any internal modifications on the unit. (The only exception would be where this manual provides specific instructions which should be followed in order to put in place user- installable options; see Quick Start; p. 4, p. 10.) .......................................................................................................... 006 • When using the unit with a rack or stand recom- mended by Roland, the rack or stand must be carefully placed so it is level and sure to remain stable. If not using a rack or stand, you still need to make sure that any location you choose for placing the unit provides a level surface that will properly support the unit, and keep it from wobbling. .......................................................................................................... 008e • Use only the attached power-supply cord. .......................................................................................................... 009 • Do not excessively twist or bend the power cord, nor place heavy objects on it. Doing so can damage the cord, producing severed elements and short circuits. Damaged cords are fire and shock hazards! .......................................................................................................... 013 • In households with small children, an adult should provide supervision until the child is capable of following all the rules essential for the safe operation of the unit. .......................................................................................................... 014 • Protect the unit from strong impact. (Do not drop it!) .......................................................................................................... The Used for instructions intended to alert the user to the risk of death or severe injury should the unit be used improperly. symbol alerts the user to important instructions or warnings.The specific meaning of the symbol is determined by the design contained within the triangle. In the case of the symbol at left, it is used for general cautions, warnings, or alerts to danger. Used for instructions intended to alert the user to the risk of injury or material damage should the unit be used improperly. The symbol alerts the user to items that must never be carried out (are forbidden). The specific thing that must not be done is indicated by the design contained within the circle. In the case of the symbol at left, it * Material damage refers to damage or means that the unit must never be disassembled. other adverse effects caused with respect to the home and all its furnishings, as well to domestic animals or pets. The ● symbol alerts the user to things that must be carried out. The specific thing that must be done is indicated by the design contained within the circle. In the case of the symbol at left, it means that the power- cord plug must be unplugged from the outlet. 015 • Do not force the unit’s power-supply cord to share an outlet with an unreasonable number of other devices. Be especially careful when using extension cords—the total power used by all devices you have connected to the extension cord’s outlet must never exceed the power rating (watts/amperes) for the extension cord. Excessive loads can cause the insulation on the cord to heat up and eventually melt through. .......................................................................................................... 016 • Before using the unit in a foreign country, consult with your retailer, the nearest Roland Service Center, or an authorized Roland distributor, as listed on the “Information” page. .......................................................................................................... 022a • Always turn the unit off and unplug the power cord before attempting installation of the circuit board (SR-JV80/SRX Series; Quick Start; p. 19). .......................................................................................................... 3 4USING THE UNIT SAFELY 102a • Always grasp only the plug on the power-supply cord when plugging into, or unplugging from an outlet. .......................................................................................................... 104 • Try to prevent cords and cables from becoming entangled. Also, all cords and cables should be placed so they are out of the reach of children. .......................................................................................................... 106 • Never climb on top of, nor place heavy objects on the unit. .......................................................................................................... 107a • Never handle the power cord or its plug with wet hands when plugging into, or unplugging from, an outlet. .......................................................................................................... 108a • Before moving the unit, disconnect the power plug from the outlet, and pull out all cords from external devices. .......................................................................................................... 109a • Before cleaning the unit, turn off the power and unplug the power cord from the outlet (Quick Start; p. 19). .......................................................................................................... 110a • Whenever you suspect the possibility of lightning in your area, pull the plug on the power cord out of the outlet. .......................................................................................................... 115a • Install only the specified circuit board(s) (SR-JV80/ SRX Series). Remove only the specified screws (Quick Start; p. 4, p. 10). ..........................................................................................................

Important Notes In addition to the items listed under “IMPORTANT SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS” and “USING THE UNIT SAFELY” on pages 2 and 3, please read and observe the following: Power Supply • Do not use this unit on the same power circuit with any device that will generate line noise (such as an electric motor or variable lighting system). • Before connecting this unit to other devices, turn off the power to all units. This will help prevent malfunctions and/or damage to speakers or other devices. Placement • This device may interfere with radio and television reception. Do not use this device in the vicinity of such receivers. • Do not expose the unit to direct sunlight, place it near devices that radiate heat, leave it inside an enclosed vehicle, or otherwise subject it to temperature extremes. Excessive heat can deform or discolor the unit. • To avoid possible breakdown, do not use the unit in a wet area, such as an area exposed to rain or other moisture. Maintenance • For everyday cleaning wipe the unit with a soft, dry cloth or one that has been slightly dampened with water. To remove stubborn dirt, use a cloth impregnated with a mild, non-abrasive detergent. Afterwards, be sure to wipe the unit thoroughly with a soft, dry cloth. • Never use benzine, thinners, alcohol or solvents of any kind, to avoid the possibility of discoloration and/or deformation. Repairs and Data • Please be aware that all data contained in the unit’s memory may be lost when the unit is sent for repairs. Important data should always be backed up memory card, or written down on paper (when possible). During repairs, due care is taken to avoid the loss of data. However, in certain cases (such as when circuitry related to memory itself is out of order), we regret that it may not be possible to restore the data, and Roland assumes no liability concerning such loss of data. Memory Backup • This unit contains a battery which powers the unit’s memory circuits while the main power is off. When this battery becomes weak, the message shown below will appear in the display. Once you see this message, have the battery replaced with a fresh one as soon as possible to avoid the loss of all data in memory. To have the battery replaced, consult with your retailer, the nearest Roland Service Center, or an authorized Roland distributor, as listed on the “Information” page. “Battery Low” Additional Precautions • Please be aware that the contents of memory can be irretrievably lost as a result of a malfunction, or the improper operation of the unit. To protect yourself against the risk of loosing important data, we recommend that you periodically save a backup copy of important data you have stored in the unit’s memory on a memory card. • Unfortunately, it may be impossible to restore the contents of data that was stored in the unit’s memory, a memory card, or another MIDI device (e.g., a sequencer) once it has been lost. Roland Corporation assumes no liability concerning such loss of data. • Use a reasonable amount of care when using the unit’s buttons, sliders, or other controls; and when using its jacks and connectors. Rough handling can lead to malfunctions. • Never strike or apply strong pressure to the display. • When connecting / disconnecting all cables, grasp the connector itself—never pull on the cable. This way you will avoid causing shorts, or damage to the cable’s internal elements. • A small amount of heat will radiate from the unit during normal operation. • To avoid disturbing your neighbors, try to keep the unit’s volume at reasonable levels. You may prefer to use headphones, so you do not need to be concerned about those around you (especially when it is late at night). • When you need to transport the unit, package it in the box (including padding) that it came in, if possible. Otherwise, you will need to use equivalent packaging materials. • Use only the specified expression pedal (EV-5; sold separately). By connecting any other expression pedals, you risk causing malfunction and/or damage to the unit. Before Using Memory Cards Using Memory Cards • Carefully insert the DATA card all the way in—until it is firmly in place. fig.00-01.e Insert with the surface with the gold connector facing up • Never touch the terminals of the DATA card. Also, avoid getting the terminals dirty. 5

6 How to Use This Manual

This owner’s manual is organized as follows. But before you start reading it, we’d like to suggest going through the Quick Start manual. The separate volume Q & A contains frequently asked questions about the XV-88, along with answers to those questions. Please refer to this booklet as needed. Chapter 1. Overview of the XV-88 This chapter covers XV-88 sound generator section configurations, as well as basic operation. Reading it is essential for understanding XV-88 operational procedures. Chapter 2. Playing This chapter explains how to play in Patch, Performance, and Rhythm Set modes, and how to use the XV-88’s many different performance functions. Reading it is essential for understanding XV-88 operational procedures. Chapter 3. Creating Performances This chapter explains how to create Performances, and describes what the Performance parameters do and how they are composed. Read this chapter when you wish to create Performances. Chapter 4. Zone Settings This chapter explains how to make Zone settings for Performance mode, and describes what the Zone parameters do and how they are composed. Read this chapter when you wish to make Zone settings. Chapter 5. Creating Patches This chapter explains how to create Patches, and describes what the Patch parameters do and how they are composed. Read this chapter when you wish to create Patches. Chapter 6. Creating Rhythm Sets This chapter explains how to create Rhythm Sets, and describes what the Rhythm Set parameters do and how they are composed. Read this chapter when you wish to create Rhythm Sets. Chapter 7. Adding Effects This chapter explains how to make settings for the XV-88’s onboard effects, and describes the type and operation of each effect. Be sure to read this when adding effects to Patches and Performances. Chapter 8. Saving Sounds This chapter describes how the XV-88’s memory is arranged, and explains how tones are saved. Read this chapter when you wish to save created sounds. Chapter 9. Getting More Familiar with the XV-88 (System Functions) This chapter describes how the System parameters that determine the XV-88’s operation environment work and how these parameters are organized. Refer to it as necessary. Chapter 10. Memory Settings (Utility Mode) This chapter goes over the various Utility functions such as storing Patch, Performance or Rhythm Set data, clearing the internal memory, etc. Refer to it as necessary. Chapter 11. Using the XV-88 as a GM Sound Module (GM Mode) This chapter explains needed procedures and parameters for using the XV-88 as a General MIDI/General MIDI 2 System- compatible sound generator. Read this chapter when you want to play back commercially available General MIDI scores (music files created for General MIDI sound generators). Chapter 12. Realizing the Potential of the XV-88 This chapter includes various techniques that expand the XV- 88’s operational scope. It includes use with external MIDI devices, live performance applications and others. Refer to it as necessary. Appendices This chapter contains a troubleshooting section for use when the XV-88 is not functioning as expected. There is also a list of error messages that you can refer to if an error message appears on the display. A list of parameters and a MIDI implementation chart are also provided. How to Use This Manual Notation Used in This Owner’s Manual To make operation procedures easy to understand, the following notation system is adopted: Characters and numbers in square brackets [ ] indicate buttons on the front panel. For example, [PATCH] represents the PATCH button and [ENTER] stands for the ENTER button. In addition, “[A] + [B]” indicates “press [B] while holding down [A]”; “[A] → [B]” means “press [B] after first pressing (and releasing) [A].” (p. **) refers to pages within the manual. In this manual, when any particular parameter is referred to, the name of the parameter is given, and this is then followed (in parenthesis) by information detailing its mode, display group, and display. For example: Output Assign parameter (PERFORM/EFFECTS/OUTPUT). Below are the meanings of the symbols preceding certain sentences in the text. These alert you to cautions or similar important information. Be sure to read these. These are reference memos. Read as needed. These are hints for operating the XV-88. Read as needed. These provide information from related reference pages. Read as needed. The display screens printed in this owner’s manual are based on the factory settings. However, please be aware that in some cases they may differ from the actual factory settings.

7 8 Contents Main Features........................................................................................13 Front and Rear Panel............................................................................14 Front Panel................................................................................................................................................. 14 Rear Panel .................................................................................................................................................. 17 Chapter 1. Overview of the XV-88........................................................19 How the XV-88 Is Organized.................................................................................................................. 19 Basic Structure ............................................................................................................................... 19 Classification of XV-88 Sound Types ......................................................................................... 20 Number of Voices.......................................................................................................................... 23 Basic Operations on the XV-88 ............................................................................................................... 24 Switching Modes ........................................................................................................................... 24 About the Function Buttons ........................................................................................................ 25 About the Cursor Buttons............................................................................................................ 26 Modifying a Value ........................................................................................................................ 27 Assigning a Name ......................................................................................................................... 28 Chapter 2. Playing.................................................................................29 Playing in Patch Mode............................................................................................................................. 29 Selecting a Patch............................................................................................................................ 29 Selecting Favorite Patches from the Favorite List .................................................................... 31 Using Phrase Preview to Play Patches....................................................................................... 32 Making a Patch Sound Thick or Thin (Turning a Tone On/Off)........................................... 32 Playing Single Notes (Solo) ......................................................................................................... 33 Creating Smooth Pitch Changes (Portamento)......................................................................... 33 Using the Sliders to Modify the Sound in Realtime................................................................. 34 Playing in Performance Mode ................................................................................................................ 34 Selecting a Performance ............................................................................................................... 35 Playing Fatter and Richer Sounds by Combining Patches (Layer)........................................ 36 Splitting the Keyboard to Play Separate Patches in Different Sections (Split)..................... 36 Playing Along with Song Playback (XV-88 Used as a Multi-timbral Sound Generator) ....37 Assigning a Different Patch to a Part ......................................................................................... 38 Using the Sliders to Modify the Sound in Realtime................................................................. 38 Playing in Rhythm Set Mode.................................................................................................................. 39 Selecting a Rhythm Set ................................................................................................................. 39 Selecting Favorite Rhythm Sets from the Favorite List ........................................................... 40 Playing Percussion Instruments ................................................................................................. 41 Playing Arpeggios (Arpeggiator)........................................................................................................... 41 Playing an Arpeggio Over a Preset Keyboard Area ................................................................ 43 Holding an Arpeggio.................................................................................................................... 43 Simulating a Rhythm Guitar ....................................................................................................... 44 Playing an Arpeggio from an External MIDI Device............................................................... 44 Creating an Arpeggio Pattern ..................................................................................................... 44 Moving Your Hand Above the D Beam Controller to Apply Effects (D Beam Controller) .......... 45 Convenient Functions for Performance ................................................................................................ 47 Transposing the Keyboard in Octave Units (Octave Shift)..................................................... 47 Transposing the Keyboard in Semitone Steps (Transpose) .................................................... 48 If “Stuck” Notes Occur (Panic).................................................................................................... 48 Contents Chapter 3. Creating Performances......................................................49 How a Performance Is Organized.......................................................................................................... 49 How to Make the Performance Settings................................................................................................ 49 Making Settings While Comparing Parts (Palette Edit) .......................................................... 50 Copying the Settings of Another Part (Part Copy)................................................................... 50 Functions of Performance Parameters................................................................................................... 51 Settings Common to the Entire Performance (COMMON) .................................................... 51 Setting Effects for a Performance (EFFECTS) ........................................................................... 52 Making Settings for Receiving MIDI (MIDI)............................................................................. 52 Making Settings for Each Part (PART)....................................................................................... 53 Confirming MIDI Information for Each Part (INFO) .............................................................. 56 Changing the Settings of the Patch/Rhythm Set Assigned to a Part................................................ 56 Chapter 4. Zone Settings......................................................................57 How to Make the Zone Settings ............................................................................................................. 57 Making Settings While Comparing Zones (Palette Edit) ........................................................ 58 Functions of Zone Parameters ................................................................................................................ 58 Settings Common to the Entire Zone (COMMON) ................................................................. 58 Setting the Keyboard Range (KEY RANGE)............................................................................. 59 Making Settings for Transmitting MIDI (MIDI)....................................................................... 59 Controlling External Sound Module (EXT CONTROL).......................................................... 60 Arpeggiator Settings (ARPEGGIO) ............................................................................................ 61 Setting the D Beam Controller (D BEAM) ................................................................................. 63 Confirming the Settings for Each Zone (INFO)........................................................................ 64 Chapter 5. Creating Patches ................................................................65 How a Patch Is Organized ...................................................................................................................... 65 How a Tone Is Organized ............................................................................................................ 65 How to Make the Patch Settings ............................................................................................................ 66 Making Settings While Comparing Tones (Palette Edit) ........................................................ 67 Copying the Settings of Another Tone (Tone Copy) ............................................................... 68 Cautions When Selecting a Waveform ...................................................................................... 68 Functions of Patch Parameters ............................................................................................................... 69 Settings Common to the Entire Patch (COMMON)................................................................. 69 Setting Effects for a Patch (EFFECTS) ........................................................................................ 75 Using Controllers to Change How Sounds Are Played (CONTROL)................................... 76 Modifying Waveforms (WAVE) ................................................................................................. 81 Modulating Sounds (LFO) ........................................................................................................... 83 Modifying Pitch (PITCH)............................................................................................................. 86 Modifying the Brightness of a Sound with a Filter (TVF)....................................................... 87 Adjusting the Volume and Pan (TVA)....................................................................................... 90 Chapter 6. Creating Rhythm Sets........................................................93 How a Rhythm Set Is Organized............................................................................................................ 93 How to Make the Rhythm Set Settings ................................................................................................. 93 Making Settings While Comparing Waveforms (Palette Edit)............................................... 94 Copying the Settings of Another Rhythm Tone (Rhythm Tone Copy)................................. 94 Cautions When Selecting a Waveform ...................................................................................... 95 Functions of Rhythm Set Parameters .................................................................................................... 96 Settings Common to the Entire Rhythm Set (COMMON)...................................................... 96 Setting Effects for a Rhythm Set (EFFECTS) ............................................................................. 97 Controlling How a Rhythm Tone will Sound with Controllers (CONTROL) ..................... 97 Modifying Waveform of a Rhythm Tone (WAVE) .................................................................. 98 Modifying Pitch of a Rhythm Tone (PITCH) .......................................................................... 100 Changing the Tone (Filter) of a Rhythm Tone (TVF)............................................................. 101 Adjusting the Volume and Pan of a Rhythm Tone (TVA).................................................... 103 9 10Contents Chapter 7. Adding Effects ..................................................................105 About the Onboard Effects ................................................................................................................... 105 Effect Types.................................................................................................................................. 105 Turning Effects On/Off.............................................................................................................. 105 Applying Effects in Patch Mode or Rhythm Set Mode..................................................................... 106 Selecting the Way the Direct Sound is Output ....................................................................... 108 The Settings for Each Tone/Rhythm Tone.............................................................................. 109 Applying Effects in Performance Mode.............................................................................................. 111 Selecting the Way the Direct Sound is Output ....................................................................... 113 Making Multi-Effects Settings .............................................................................................................. 114 Setting Procedure ........................................................................................................................ 114 Functions of Parameters............................................................................................................. 114 Multi-Effects Types ..................................................................................................................... 117 Making Chorus Settings ........................................................................................................................ 156 Setting Procedure ........................................................................................................................ 156 Functions of Parameters............................................................................................................. 156 Making Reverb Settings......................................................................................................................... 158 Setting Procedure ........................................................................................................................ 158 Functions of Parameters............................................................................................................. 159 Copying Another Effect Setting (Effects Copy) ................................................................................. 161 Chapter 8. Saving Sounds .................................................................162 About Memory........................................................................................................................................ 162 Temporary Memory.................................................................................................................... 163 Rewritable Memory .................................................................................................................... 163 Non-Rewritable Memory ........................................................................................................... 163 Saving to Internal Memory ................................................................................................................... 164 Comparing with the Save Destination Patch (Compare Function) ..................................... 164 Registering Favorite Patches/Rhythm Sets in the Favorite List .......................................... 165 Saving to an External MIDI Device...................................................................................................... 166 Saving a Group of Tones to a Memory Card...................................................................................... 167 Chapter 9. Getting More Familiar with the XV-88 (System Functions) ... 168 How to Make the System Function Settings....................................................................................... 168 Functions of System Parameters .......................................................................................................... 168 Display Screen Contrast and Clock Settings (SETUP)........................................................... 168 MIDI Settings (MIDI).................................................................................................................. 169 Keyboard and Controllers Settings (CONTROL)................................................................... 171 Adjusting Tuning (TUNE) ......................................................................................................... 173 Arpeggiator Settings (ARPEGGIO) .......................................................................................... 174 Setting the D Beam Controller (D BEAM) ............................................................................... 176 Phrase Preview Settings (PREVIEW) ....................................................................................... 177 Checking the Installation of the Wave Expansion Board and Controlling External MIDI Devices (INFO) .................................. 178 Chapter 10. Memory Settings (Utility Mode).....................................179 About Utility Mode ................................................................................................................................ 179 Basic Procedure in Utility Mode .......................................................................................................... 179 Storing Sound Data in User Memory (WRITE).................................................................................. 180 Saving a Performance ................................................................................................................. 180 Saving a Patch.............................................................................................................................. 181 Saving a Rhythm Set................................................................................................................... 181 Copying Sound Generator Settings (COPY)....................................................................................... 182 Copying a Performance.............................................................................................................. 182 Copying a Patch .......................................................................................................................... 183 Copying a Rhythm Set................................................................................................................ 184 Contents Initializing Sound Generator Settings (INIT) ..................................................................................... 185 Initializing a Performance.......................................................................................................... 185 Initializing a Patch ...................................................................................................................... 185 Initializing a Rhythm Set............................................................................................................ 185 Transmitting Sound Settings (XFER)................................................................................................... 185 Transmitting Data to an External MIDI Device...................................................................... 185 Transmitting Data to the XV-88 ................................................................................................ 186 Protecting the Internal Memory (PROTECT) ..................................................................................... 188 Memory Card-Related Settings (CARD)............................................................................................. 188 Formatting the Memory Card for the XV-88 (FORMAT)...................................................... 189 Renaming a File (RENAME)...................................................................................................... 189 Deleting Unwanted Files (DELETE)......................................................................................... 189 Copying Files Between Memory Cards (FILE COPY) ........................................................... 189 Checking the Contents of a Memory Card (INFO) ................................................................ 190 Loading a File from Memory Card into the XV-88 (LOAD) ............................................................ 190 Saving Data to Memory Card (SAVE)................................................................................................. 190 Recalling Factory Default Settings (FACTORY RESET) ................................................................... 191 Chapter 11. Using the XV-88 as a GM Sound Module (GM Mode).. 192 Entering GM Mode................................................................................................................................. 192 Initializing the Sound Generator for General MIDI System Basic Settings........................ 192 Playing Back GM Scores............................................................................................................. 192 Modifying GM Mode Settings.............................................................................................................. 193 Making Effects Settings in GM Mode (EFFECTS) .................................................................. 194 Making Settings for Receiving MIDI (MIDI)........................................................................... 195 Making Settings for Each Part (PART)..................................................................................... 196 Confirming MIDI Information for Each Part (INFO) ............................................................ 197 Convenient Functions in GM Mode (GM Utility) ............................................................................. 198 Initializing GM Mode (INIT) ..................................................................................................... 198 Transmitting GM Mode Settings (XFER)................................................................................. 198 Chapter 12. Realizing the Potential of the XV-88 .............................199 Techniques for Using Patches............................................................................................................... 199 Reinforcing Filter Characteristics ............................................................................................. 199 Using the Slider to Change the Pan in Realtime..................................................................... 199 Using a Pedal Switch to Modify the Speed of the Rotary Effect .......................................... 199 Changing the Speed of the Rotary Effect to Synchronize It to the LFO Cycle................... 200 Changing the Tone Produced with the Modulation Lever................................................... 200 Syncing the LFO Cycle to System Tempo ............................................................................... 200 Modifying Multi-Effects to Match the System’s Tempo........................................................ 201 Playing Phrase Loops in Sync with the System Tempo ........................................................ 201 Synchronizing the Timing at Which Tones Play to the System Tempo.............................. 202 Using the XV-88 to Play Live................................................................................................................ 202 Changing Multiple Sounds of an External MIDI Device Simultaneously.......................... 202 Changing Sounds with a Pedal Switch.................................................................................... 203 Controlling an External MIDI Sequencer with the D Beam Controller .............................. 203 Using External MIDI Devices ............................................................................................................... 203 Playing an External MIDI Sound Module from the XV-88 ................................................... 203 Controlling an External MIDI Sequencer from the XV-88 .................................................... 204 Playing the XV-88’s Sound Generator from an External MIDI Device ............................... 205 Changing the Tone Settings from an External MIDI Device in Realtime ........................... 205 Changing the Multi-Effects Settings From an External MIDI Device in Realtime ............ 206 Selecting XV-88 Sounds from an External MIDI Device ....................................................... 206 Enjoying Desktop Music ....................................................................................................................... 208 Connecting to Your Computer.................................................................................................. 208 Disconnecting the Keyboard from the Internal Sound Generator (Local OFF) ................. 211 How MIDI Messages Are Exchanged with a Computer....................................................... 212 11 12Contents Appendices ................................ 213 Troubleshooting..................................................................................214 Error Messages ...................................................................................218 Quick Reference of Procedures ........................................................220 Parameter List .....................................................................................230 Performance List.................................................................................252 Patch List.............................................................................................253 Rhythm Set List...................................................................................258 Waveform List .....................................................................................263 Arpeggio Style List .............................................................................268 About MIDI ...........................................................................................269 MIDI Implementation...........................................................................270 Specifications......................................................................................298 Computer Cable Wiring Diagrams.....................................................299 Index.....................................................................................................300

Main Features 128-Voice Polyphony The previous maximum number of 64 simultaneous voices has been expanded to 128, providing ample expression capabilities, even with tones composed of a number of combined tones. Compatible with the New “SRX Series” Wave Expansion Boards The XV-88 features two expansion slots for the new “SRX Series” Wave Expansion boards, each of which provides the waveform capacity of four “SR-JV80” boards. Of course, since the XV-88 is also equipped with an additional two slots for previous-generation “SR-JV80” Wave Expansion boards, you can also install such boards that you now may be using in the XV-88 as well. Thus, with a Wave Expansion board installed in every slot, you can get massive waveforms equaling even those obtainable with samplers, all of which are ready to use as soon as you turn on the instrument, with no loading from any sequencer or other external recording device required (Quick Start; p. 4, p. 10). Powerful Array of Effects While including, of course, all of the algorithms of the JV- 2080, the XV-88’s effects comprise a huge collection of Roland’s digital signal processing technology, 3D DELAY that makes full use of RSS (Roland Sound Space technology), Lo-Fi processing from Roland’s MC-505 groovebox, the SRV- 330’s popular REVERB, along with a newly designed RING MODULATOR, and more, for a total of 63 different algorithms (p. 117). General MIDI- and General MIDI 2- Compatible The XV-88 is compatible with both General MIDI and General MIDI 2 standards. When working with music data that conforms to General MIDI and/or General MIDI 2 (GM scores), you can combine the XV-88 with a computer or sequencer, and use the XV-88 to play back the data (p. 192). 88-Key Piano Keyboard Features Hammer Action with Aftertouch The XV-88 is equipped with a full 88-key piano keyboard utilizing a hammer action system for rich expressiveness, with aftertouch provided as well. The XV-88 gives you both the pure, unspoiled expression you get with a piano, and the dynamic play of a synthesizer, all in a single instrument. Sophisticated User Interface The XV-88 also features the Roland XP-30’s popular Patch Search function and Phrase Preview function. The Patch Finder function (p. 30) lets you rapidly find the patch you want simply by specifying a patch category. By pressing [PHRASE PREVIEW], you can then hear the selected patch play a phrase suitable for that type of patch (Phrase Preview, p. 32). Equipped with COMPUTER Connector A special computer cable makes it easy for you to connect the XV-88 to your computer, so that you can enjoy ensemble playing (p. 208). Arpeggiator Included You can easily perform arpeggios, and use “rhythm guitar,” simply by pressing a few chords. You can even specify the rhythmical “feel” you want (p. 41). Equipped with D Beam Controller The XV-88 also comes with the D Beam Controller which allows you to change the sound dynamically as you perform, according to the position of your hand as you move it over the controller. By moving your hand above the panel, you can control even subtle changes in tones, effects, and pitches that are difficult to make using bender and aftertouch, all in realtime, bringing your live performances to a whole new level (p. 45). The D Beam Controller is provided under license from Interactive Light, Inc. General MIDI General MIDI is a set of recommendations which seeks to provide a way to go beyond the limitations of proprietary designs, and standardize the MIDI capabilities of sound generating devices. Sound generating devices and music files that meet the General MIDI standard bear the General MIDI logo ( ). Music files bearing the General MIDI logo can be played back using any General MIDI sound generating unit to produce essentially the same musical performance. General MIDI 2 The upwardly compatible General MIDI 2 ( ) recommendations pick up where the original General MIDI left off, offering enhanced expressive capabilities, and even greater compatibility. Issues that were not covered by the original General MIDI recommendations, such as how sounds are to be edited, and how effects should be handled, have now been precisely defined. Moreover, the available sounds have been expanded. General MIDI 2 compliant sound generators are capable of reliably playing back music files that carry either the General MIDI or General MIDI 2 logo. In some cases, the conventional form of General MIDI, which does not include the new enhancements, is referred to as “General MIDI 1” as a way of distinguishing it from General MIDI 2. 13

14Front and Rear Panel Front Panel fig.00-02 1 5 2 3 4 6 D BEAM CONTROLLER Section You can apply a variety of effects to sounds simply by moving your hand. → (p. 45) [ON] Switches the D Beam controller on/off. Volume Slider Adjusts the overall volume that is output from the rear panel OUTPUT jacks and PHONES jack. → (Quick Start; p. 18) PALETTE Section Use the four sliders to modify sounds in realtime. [FILTER/ENV] Press this button ON when modifying filter and/or envelope settings in realtime using the four sliders (CUTOFF/ RESONANCE/ATTACK/RELEASE). → (p. 34, p. 38) [LEVEL] Press this button ON when adjusting volume balance in realtime using the four sliders (1/2/3/4). → (p. 34, p. 39) [CONTROLLER] Can be switched on when you wish to assign various parameters to the four sliders, and modify the sound as you play (C1/C2/C3/C4). → (Quick Start; p. 66) 7 123 45 KEY EFFECTS Section The buttons in this section allow you to assign various functions to the keys of the XV-88’s keyboard. [PORTAMENTO] Switches Portamento on/off. → (p. 33) [SOLO] Specifies playing a single note at a time. → (p. 33) [TRANSPOSE] Specifies transposing the keyboard in semitone steps. → (p. 48) [ARPEGGIO] Switches Arpeggiator on/off. → (p. 41) [+OCT], [-OCT] These buttons adjust the pitch of the keyboard in octave steps. → (p. 47) Pressing either of these buttons while holding down [TRANSPOSE] allows you to set the desired amount of transposition. → (p. 48) MODE Section The buttons in this section select modes. The button indicator of the selected mode will light/blink. → (p. 24) [PERFORM]/[GM] Pressed to get into Performance mode. Hold down [SHIFT] while you press [PERFORM] to select GM mode. → (p. 34, p. 192) [PATCH]/[PART] Pressed to get into Patch mode. By holding down [PERFORM] and pressing [PATCH], you can modify the settings of the Patch and Rhythm Set that is assigned to each part of the performance. → (p. 29, p. 38, p. 56)

Front and Rear Panel fig.00-03 [RHYTHM] Selects Rhythm Set mode. → (p. 39) [ZONE] When the XV-88 is in Performance mode, this switches it to the Zone mode. → (p. 57) [SYSTEM] Selects System mode. → (p. 168) [UTILITY] Selects Utility mode. → (p. 179) EFFECTS Section Used to switch on and off the onboard effects (Multi-effects, Chorus, Reverb). When on, the button indicator for the effect is lighted. → (p. 105) [MULTI] Turns Multi-effects on/off. [CHORUS] Turns Chorus on/off. [REVERB] Turns Reverb on/off. Display Shows various information for the currently selected function or operation. [PALETTE EDIT]/[LOCAL/TX] PALETTE EDIT: Press this when you want to make changes to Patch or Performance settings using the Palette page. → (p. 50, p. 58, p. 67, p. 94) LOCAL/TX: When the indicator for this button is extinguished, the Local switch can be switched on/off. When the indicator is lit, the Transmit switch can be switched on/ 8 10 off. Functions buttons are employed for this purpose. → (p. 25) [EDIT] Press this button when you wish to adjust various settings. Use the function buttons to select the display screen for the parameter you wish to modify. 9 11 Function Buttons The function of these buttons will depend on the operational mode and the status of the [EDIT] indicator. → (p. 25) [1-8/9-16] Use this button to select the group (1–8/9–16) of Parts or Zones to be selected by the function buttons. → (p. 25) [EXIT]/[PANIC] EXIT: Press this button when you wish to return to the Play page of each mode, or to cancel an operation without executing. PANIC: If for some reason notes are stuck and continue sounding, hold down [SHIFT] and press this button to clear the stuck notes. → (p. 48) 6[UNDO/COMPARE] UNDO: Press this button to restore a modified value to the original value. → (p. 27, p. 49, p. 57, p. 67, p. 94) COMPARE: When saving or copying Tone settings, press this to check the sound at the save destination, or at the copy source. → (p. 164, p. 181, p. 183, p. 184) 8 VALUE Dial This dial is used to modify values. If you hold down [SHIFT] as you turn the VALUE dial, the value will change in greater increments. → (p. 27) 7 CURSOR Buttons Press these to switch pages and to move the cursor (the underline). → (p. 26) In the Play page of each mode, pressing the CURSOR buttons while holding down [SHIFT] allows the remote control of external sequencers. → (p. 26, p. 204) 15

16Front and Rear Panel 9 10[PHRASE PREVIEW]/[DEMO] PHRASE PREVIEW: Press this when you wish to use phrases to audition a patch. → (p. 32) DEMO: To hear the demo playback, hold down [SHIFT] and press this button. → (Quick Start; p. 21) [PATCH FINDER]/[FAVORITE LIST] PATCH FINDER: Selects a patch by using the Patch Finder function. → (p. 30) FAVORITE LIST: When you press this button while holding down [SHIFT], you can register the favorite Patch to the list and choose the Patch from the list. → (p. 31, p. 40, p. 165) [INC/+], [DEC/-] Use these buttons to modify values. If you keep on holding down one button and pressing the other, the value change 11 accelerates. If you press one of these buttons while holding down [SHIFT], the value will change in bigger increments. → (p. 27) [0]–[9] (Numeric Keys) Use these buttons to modify values. They can be used to enter numeric values as well as alphabetical characters. → (p. 27, p. 28) When [PATCH FINDER] is on, this becomes the button for choosing a category group using the Patch Finder function. → (p. 30) Press [0] while holding down [SHIFT] to turn the Digit Hold function on/off. With the Digit Hold on, the 100’s place and 10’s place will be fixed and only the 1’s place will change. This means that you can select Patches simply by pressing the numeric key for the 1’s place, without having to press [ENTER]. The same applies when selecting Performances or Rhythm sets. → (p. 30) [SHIFT] This is used in combination with other buttons. Some buttons on the front panel include black-printed characters. They indicate the button’s function when [SHIFT] is held down. [ENTER]/[REGISTRY] ENTER: Use this button to finalize a value or execute an operation. REGISTRY: When you press this button while holding down [SHIFT], you can directly register the favorite Patch or Rhythm Set to the Favorite List. → (p. 165) GROUP Section Selects sound groups. → (p. 29, p. 35, p. 39) [USER] Selects a sound from the user group. [CARD] Selects a sound from a memory card. [PRESET] Selects a sound from the preset group. [EXP] Selects a sound from a Wave Expansion Board (sold separately). BANK Section Selects a bank for sounds. → (p. 29, p. 35, p. 39) [A]–[H] Press these buttons to select tones from Preset Groups A–F and H, Memory Cards A–H, and Wave Expansion Boards A– D. fig.00-04 Pitch Bend/Modulation Lever This allows you to control pitch bend or apply vibrato. → (Quick Start; p. 65) Depending on the settings, other specified parameters can also be controlled. → (p. 78, p. 115, p. 173) Front and Rear Panel Rear Panel fig.00-05 fig.00-06 Power Switch fig.00-09 COMPUTER Switch Press to turn the power on/off. → (Quick Start; p. 18) AC Inlet Connect the included power cord to this inlet. → (Quick Start; p. 16) With units rated for 117V operation, the AC cable is already connected to the unit. fig.00-07 MEMORY CARD Slot A memory card (SmartMedia) can be inserted here. → (p. 167, p. 179) fig.00-08 MIDI Connectors (IN, OUT, THRU) These connectors can be connected to other MIDI devices to receive and transmit MIDI messages. → (p. 203, p. 269, Quick Start; p. 16) Sets this switch depending on the type of computer connected to COMPUTER connector, or the software you are using. Turn the power off before changing the setting of this switch. If you wish to use the MIDI connectors, set this switch to MIDI. → (p. 208, p. 209) COMPUTER Connector A special Computer cable can be connected here. The type of cable required will depend on your computer. When the COMPUTER switch is set to MIDI, this connector cannot be used. → (p. 209) You can connect optional expression pedals (EV-5, etc.) to these jacks. By assigning a desired function to a pedal, you can use it to select or modify sound or perform various other control. You can also connect optional pedal switches (DP-2, DP-6, etc.) to sustain sound. → (p. 172, Quick Start; p. 16, p. 69) HOLD PEDAL Jack An optional pedal switch (DP-2, DP-6, etc.) can be connected to this jack for use as a hold pedal. → (p. 43, p. 172, Quick Start; p. 16, 69) This can also be set so it supports the use of half-pedaling techniques. So, after connecting an optional expression pedal (EV-5, etc.), you can employ pedal work to achieve even finer control in performances in which piano tones are used. → (p. 172)

fig.00-10 CTL 1, CTL 2 PEDAL Jack 17 18Front and Rear Panel fig.00-11 OUTPUT A (MIX) Jacks (L (MONO), R) These jacks output the audio signal to the connected mixer/ amplifier system in stereo. For mono output, use the L jack. → (Quick Start; p. 16) OUTPUT B Jacks (L, R) These jacks output the audio signal to the connected mixer/ amplifier system in stereo. INDIVIDUAL 1–4 Jacks These jacks output audio signals in mono to an amp or mixer. The setting determining whether these jacks are used as stereo OUTPUT jacks or monaural INDIVIDUAL jacks is made with the Output Assign setting (p. 70, p. 96, p. 108, p. 109, p. 113). PHONES Jack This is the jack for connecting headphones (sold separately). → (Quick Start; p. 16) fig.00-12 Wave Expansion Board Installation Slot Remove the cover to reveal the slots for installation of optional Wave Expansion Boards (SR-JV80 Series, SRX Series). → (Quick Start; p. 4, 10) Chapter 1. Overview of the XV-88 How the XV-88 Is Organized Basic Structure The XV-88 can be broadly divided into two sections: a keyboard controller section and a sound generator section. The two sections are connected internally by means of MIDI. fig.01-01.e Keyboard Controller Section This section consists of the keyboard, pitch bend/modulation lever, panel sliders, and D Beam controller. It also includes any pedals that may be connected to the rear panel. Actions such as pressing and releasing of keys on the keyboard, depressing a pedal, and so forth, are converted to MIDI messages and sent to the sound generator section, or to an external MIDI device. When playing in Performance mode, the settings for the MIDI connections between the keyboard controller section and the sound generator section or external MIDI device are made in Zone mode (p. 57). Sound Generator Section The sound generator section produces the sound. Here, MIDI messages received from the keyboard controller section or external MIDI device are converted to musical signals, which are then output as analog signals from the OUTPUT and PHONES jacks. About the Local Switch The switch that connects and disconnects the MIDI connection between the keyboard controller section and the sound generator section is called the Local switch. Since essential information describing what is being played on the keyboard won’t reach the sound generator if the Local switch is set to OFF, the Local switch should normally be left ON. However, if while performing you want to send that performance data to an external sequencer as MIDI messages to be recorded, you then perform with the externally Sound connected MIDI sequencer set to MIDI Thru (whereby data Generator Sectionreceived from MIDI IN is then output from the MIDI OUT with no changes made to the data), the XV-88’s Local switch to OFF, and the MIDI Transmit switch and MIDI Receive Play switch to ON. fig.01-02.e RecordingSequencer Keyboard Controller Section (controllers such as keyboard, pitch bend lever, etc.) MIDI Thru: On MIDI IN MIDI OUT MIDI OUT MIDI IN Transmit Receive Switch: On Switch: On Generator Sound Local Switch: OffSection Keyboard Controller Section XV-88 In this case, the data sent over two paths, i.e., the data sent directly from the keyboard controller section and the data sent from the keyboard controller section via the external sequencer, ends up being sent to the sound generator section simultaneously. Thus, for example, even when you play a “C” key only once, the note “C” cannot be sounded correctly, as the sound is played by the sound generator section twice. 19 20Chapter 1. Overview of the XV-88 Classification of XV-88 Sound Types When using the XV-88, you will notice that a variety of different categories come into play when handling sounds. What follows is a simple explanation of each sound category. Tones In the XV-88, the Tone is the smallest class of sound. However, it is not possible to play a Tone by itself. The Patch is the unit of sound which can be played, and the Tones are the basic building blocks which make up the Patch. fig.01-03.e Tones consist of the following five components. WG (Wave Generator) Specifies the PCM waveform (wave) that is the basis of the sound, and determines how the pitch of the sound will change. The XV-88 has 1,083 different waveforms (p. 263). All Patches built into the XV-88 consist of combinations of Tones which are created based on these waveforms. There are four wave generators for each Rhythm Tone (percussion instrument sounds). TVF (Time Variant Filter) Specifies how the frequency components of the sound will change. TVA (Time Variant Amplifier) Specifies the volume changes and the sound’s position in a stereo soundfield. Envelope You use Envelope to initiate changes to occur to a sound over time. There are separate envelopes for Pitch, TVF (filter), and TVA (volume). For example if you wish to modify the way in which the sound attacks or decays over time, you would adjust the TVA envelope. LFO (Low Frequency Oscillator) Use the LFO to create cyclic changes (modulation) in a sound. The XV-88 has two LFOs. Either one or both can be applied to effect the WG (pitch), TVF (filter) and/or TVA (volume). When an LFO is applied to the WG pitch, a vibrato effect is produced. When an LFO is applied to the TVF cutoff Tone LFO 1 LFO 2 frequency, a wah effect is produced. When an LFO is applied to the TVA volume, a tremolo effect is produced. LFO is not included in the Rhythm Tones (percussion instrument sounds). WG TVF TVA Patches Pitch TVF TVA Patches are the basic sound configurations that you play Envelope Envelope Envelope during a performance. Each Patch can be configured by combining up to four Tones. How the four Tones are audio signal control signal combined is determined on the STRUCT page (PATCH/ COMMON) (p. 73). fig.01-04.e PatchTone 4 Tone 3 Tone 2 Tone 1 WG Pitch Envelope LFO 1 LFO 2 TVF TVA TVF Envelope TVA Envelope Chapter 1. Overview of the XV-88 Rhythm Sets A Rhythm Set is a grouping of percussion instruments (Rhythm Tones). Since percussion instruments generally do not play melodies, there is no need for a percussion instrument sound to be able to play a scale on the keyboard. It is, however, more important that as many percussion instruments as possible be available to you at the same time. Therefore, each key (note number) of a Rhythm Set will produce a different percussion instrument. fig.01-05.e Percussion instrument (Rhythm Tone) consists of the following four elements. (For details, refer to the explanations for “Tones.”) WG (Wave Generator) TVF (Time Variant Filter) TVA (Time Variant Amplifier) Envelope Performances A Performance is a collective set of assignments of the sixteen different Patches and Rhythm Sets. Since a Performance can simultaneously handle 16 different sounds, it allows you to play multiple Patches simultaneously (layer) or to play different Patches in different areas of the keyboard (split), and to create ensembles. Because the XV-88 sound generator can control multiple sounds (instruments) it is called a Multi-timbral sound generator. Rhythm Set fig.01-06.e Performance Note Number 98 (D7) Part 16 Note Number 97 (C#7) Note Number 36 (C2) Note Number 35 (B1) Rhythm Tone (Percussion instrument sound) WG TVF Pitch TVF Envelope Envelope Part 1 Patch/ Rhythm Set Parts Parts are the “sites” to which the Patches and Rhythm Sets used by the XV-88 as sound material are assigned. A single Performance comprises sixteen Parts, with a Patch or Rhythm Set being assigned to each Part. In the relationship between Performances and Parts, the Performance is like an orchestra, the Parts the performers, and the Patches and Rhythm Sets the instruments. TVA TVA Envelope 21 22Chapter 1. Overview of the XV-88 Setting the MIDI Connection (Zone and Part) Although the XV-88’s keyboard controller section and sound generator section are connected internally using a MIDI connection, in Layer Performance mode, you can then make even more detailed settings affecting the way the connection works between the keyboard controller section and the sound generator section, as well as with an external MIDI device. At the factory settings, shown below, there is a one-to-one correspondence between the Zone, the MIDI Transmit/ Receive channel, and the Part. fig.01-07.e Zone 16 (MIDI transmit channel 16) Part 16 (MIDI receive channel 16) Zone 2 (MIDI transmit channel 2) Part 2 (MIDI receive channel 2) Zone 1 (MIDI transmit channel 1) Part 1 (MIDI receive channel 1) Patch/ Rhythm Set Under these conditions, you could simply consider that “each of the Zones from 1 to 16 is linked in a one-to-one relationship with its numerical counterpart among Parts 1 to 16”. In other words, you can use Zone 1 when controlling Part 1, Zone 2 is when controlling Part 2, and so on. We recommend that under normal circumstances you use the default factory settings. In advances uses, where the factory settings would not be used, the following examples of settings might be employed. When recording to an external sequencer while playing the bass part in the left hand and the layered piano and string tones in the right hand, the following is what results when the factory settings are used. fig.01-08.e Sequencer Zone 3 (MIDI transmit channel 3) Part 3 (MIDI receive channel 3) ch.3 Bass LZone 2 (MIDI transmit channel 2) Part 2 (MIDI receive channel 2) ch.2 Strings RZone 1 (MIDI transmit channel 1) Part 1 (MIDI receive channel 1) ch.1 Piano R However, in this arrangement, the data for the performance in the right hand ends up being recorded after overlapping on MIDI Channels 1 and 2. Although normally there is no particular problem with recording overlapped data, because of the limit on the number of notes that can be recorded using an external sequencer, along with other certain issues, the external sequencer’s memory may overflow, and you may then be unable to record all the way to the end of your performance. Therefore, change the settings to those shown below (changes indicated in underline). fig.01-09.e Sequencer Zone 1 (not transmitted) Part 3 (MIDI receive channel 2) ch.2 Bass Zone 2 (MIDI transmit channel 2) Part 2 (MIDI receive channel 1) Strings L Zone 1 (MIDI transmit channel 1) Part 1 (MIDI receive channel 1) Piano ch.1 R With the above settings, the data for the performance in the right hand is sent only on MIDI Channel 1, so there is no overlapping of the performance data when recording to the sequencer. Accordingly, even performances that cause overflow when factory settings are used can still be recorded all the way to the end. In this manner, by trying out changes in the one-to-one connections between the Zones, MIDI Transmit and Receive channels, and Parts, you can obtain even more advanced use of the instrument. However, you must remain aware at all times of the MIDI channel to which each Zone is set and the channel each Part is using to receive MIDI messages, lest you run into problems such as tones other than the intended tones being played or absence of sound even when the keys are played. In this manual, the expression “the Zone and Part are linked” refers to the condition whereby a Zone’s MIDI transmit channel and a Part’s MIDI receive channel are matched in this one-to-one relationship.

Chapter 1. Overview of the XV-88 Number of Voices Voice Reserve The XV-88 is able to play up to 128 notes simultaneously. The following paragraphs discuss what this means, and what will happen when more than 128 simultaneous voices are requested from the XV-88. Calculating the Number of Voices Being Used The XV-88 is able to play up to 128 notes simultaneously. The polyphony, or the number of voices (sounds) does not refer only to the number of sounds actually being played, but changes according to the number of tones used in the Patches, and the number of Waves used in the tones. The following method is used to calculate the number of sounds used for one Patch being played. (Number of Sounds Being Played) x (Number of Tones Used by Patches Being Played) x (Number of Waves Used in the Tones) For example, with a Patch combining four tones, each of which uses two Waves, the actual number of sounds being played comes to 16. If you are using the XV-88 in Performance mode to play an ensemble, count the total number of Tones used by all the Parts using the following formula. How a Patch Sounds When the XV-88 is requested to play more than 128 voices simultaneously, currently sounding notes will be turned off to make room for newly requested notes. The note with the lowest priority will be turned off first. The order of priority is determined by the Voice Priority setting. Voice Priority can be set either to LAST or LOUDEST. When LAST is selected, a newly requested note that exceeds the 128 voice limit will cause the first-played of the currently sounding notes to be turned off. When LOUDEST is selected, the quietest of the currently sounding notes will be turned off. Normally, you will set Voice Priority to LAST. Note Priority in Performance Mode Since Performance mode is usually used to play an ensemble consisting of several Patches, it is important to decide which Parts take priority. Priority is specified by the Voice Reserve settings. When a note within a Patch needs to be turned off to make room for a new note, the Voice Priority setting of the Patch will apply. The XV-88 has a Voice Reserve function that lets you reserve a minimum number of notes that will always be available for each Part. For example if Voice Reserve is set to 10 for Part 16, Part 16 will always have 10 notes of sound- producing capacity available to it even if a total of more than 128 notes (total for all Parts) are being requested. When you make Voice Reserve settings, you need to take into account the number of notes you want to play on each Part as well as the number of Tones used by the selected Patch. (p. 53) It is not possible to make Voice Reserve settings that would cause the total of all Parts to be greater than 64 voices. 23

24Chapter 1. Overview of the XV-88 Basic Operations on the XV-88 Switching Modes The XV-88 contains a large number of functions. In order to organize these functions for easy access, they are grouped into the following modes. The mode that is selected will affect the way in which the sound generator operates, how data is shown in the display, and how the function buttons work. Use the Mode buttons to select the mode. The indicator of the selected button will light/blink, and the display will change according to the selected mode. fig.01-10 Sound Generator Selecting Patch mode, Performance mode, Rhythm Set mode, and GM mode will determine sound generator operation. One mode always has to be selected. Patch Mode In this mode, you can play an individual Patch from the keyboard or modify Patch settings. If you’re using an external MIDI device to control the XV-88 in this mode, it will function as a single-patch sound generator. Performance Mode In this mode, the XV-88 functions as a multi-timbral sound generator, and Performance settings can be modified. If you’re using an external MIDI device to control the XV-88 in this mode, it will function as a multi-timbral sound generator. To modify the settings of a Patch or Rhythm Set that’s assigned to a Part, hold down [PERFORM] and press [PATCH]. At this time, if a Patch is assigned to the Part, the [PERFORM] and [Patch] indicators will light. If a Rhythm Set is assigned to the Part, the [PERFORM] and [RHYTHM] indicators will light. Zone Mode This mode is used for a number of settings, such as those determining the way the sound generator produces sounds in response to the keyboard when played in a Performance and the way MIDI messages are sent, and for the Arpeggiator and D Beam Controller functions. To switch to Zone mode, press [ZONE] while in Performance mode. Rhythm Set Mode This is how you can play a Rhythm Set from the keyboard and modify the Rhythm Set settings. In this mode, you can play percussion instruments (Rhythm Tones) on the keyboard. The XV-88 can also be used in this mode as a sound module for managing individual Rhythm Sets when controlled from an external MIDI device. GM Mode This special mode makes the XV-88 function as a GM compatible sound generator. You should select this mode when you want to play back a GM score (music files created for General MIDI sound generator). To set GM mode, hold down [SHIFT] and press [PERFORM]. [PERFORM], [PATCH] and [RHYTHM] indicators will not light. System Mode This mode is for determining global XV-88 settings such as tuning, display contrast and how MIDI messages are received. Utility Mode Here you can save and transmit settings for the sound generator, and make settings related to memory cards. Chapter 1. Overview of the XV-88 About the Function Buttons Function buttons are buttons that perform a variety of functions. The function they perform will depend on the current mode, and on whether [EDIT] is on (lit) or off (extinguished). [EDIT] will turn on or off each time you press it. fig.01-11[EDIT] switches the function of the function buttons, but pressing [EDIT] will not make the display change. If you wish to modify a setting, press the [EDIT] to make the indicator light, and then press a function button to select the display group and switch the display. When you finish making settings, press [EXIT] or a mode button to switch the display. In Patch Mode ([EDIT] Indicator is Extinguished) The function buttons will act as Tone Switch buttons ([TONE SWITCH]) and Tone Select buttons ([TONE SELECT]). [TONE SWITCH] allow you to turn each Tone in the Patch on (lit) or off (extinguished). When a Tone is turned on, it can be heard. Use [TONE SELECT] to select the Tone you wish to modify. To select a Tone to modify, turn off [EDIT] indicator in the Tone setting page. To select two or more Tones simultaneously, hold down one of [TONE SELECT] and press the other [TONE SELECT]. In this case, the numbers of Tones other than the first-selected Tone will be displayed as * symbols. In Rhythm Set Mode ([EDIT] Indicator is Extinguished) The function buttons (TONE SELECT section) will select the key shown in the display. If the [EDIT] indicator is turned off in the Rhythm Set setting page (the setting page for individual keys), the function buttons will select the key to be edited. In Performance Mode ([EDIT] Indicator is Extinguished) The Function buttons work as [ZONE SELECT] buttons that switch each Zone’s Local switch and Transmit switch on (lit) and off (extinguished). When the [LOCAL/TX] indicator is extinguished, the switch has the linked Part for each Zone play (lit) or not play (extinguished). When the [LOCAL/TX] indicator is lit, the switch allows the data describing all actions using the keyboard controller section for each Zone to be sent (lit) or prevents it from being sent (extinguished). Since 16 Zones are being controlled using only 8 buttons, use [1-8/9-16] to select the set of Zones you want to control. When the [1-8/9-16] indicator is out, you can switch Zones 1–8 on/off. When it is lit, you can switch Zones 9–16 on/off. If the [EDIT] indicator is turned off in the Part setting page, the function buttons will act as PART Select buttons ([PART SELECT]) that select the Part to be edited. TONE SELECT [1]: move to an octave lower key TONE SELECT [2]: move to the semitone below TONE SELECT [3]: move to the semitone above TONE SELECT [4]: move to an octave higher key In GM Mode ([EDIT] Indicator is Extinguished) The Function buttons work as [PART SELECT] buttons that switch the reception of Note messages on (lit) and off (extinguished). Since 16 Parts are being controlled using only 8 buttons, use [1-8/9-16] to select the set of Parts you want to control. When the [1-8/9-16] indicator is out, you can switch Parts 1–8 on/ off. When it is lit, you can switch Parts 9–16 on/off. If the [EDIT] indicator is turned off in the Part setting page, the function buttons will act as PART Select buttons ([PART SELECT]) that select the Part to be edited. 25

26Chapter 1. Overview of the XV-88 When [EDIT] Indicator is Lit Each mode contains a large number of settable items, and these items are organized into groups. When [EDIT] indicator is lit, the function buttons are used to select page groups. The displays that appear will depend on the current mode. The groups that can be selected in each mode are printed on the front panel above the buttons. About the Cursor Buttons The Cursor buttons are pressed to switch pages and move the cursor, and are used for remote control of external sequencers. fig.01-12 Moving Between Display Pages The various pages are grouped by function button, and each group contains several display pages. Use the cursor buttons to move between these display pages and groups. Moving Between Pages An upward-pointing arrow ( ) shown in the display indicates that one or more pages exist before this page. A downward-pointing arrow ( ) shown in the page indicates that one or more pages exist after this page. Press to move to the previous page, or to move to the next page. Press while holding down [SHIFT] to jump to the first page. Press while holding down [SHIFT] to jump to the last page. fig.01-13 Moving Between Groups In group pages that you select using the function buttons, you can hold down [SHIFT] and press to move to the group of the function button to the left, or hold down [SHIFT] and press to move to the group of the function button to the right. Whenever you are in any group page, you can move to another group even if [EDIT] indicator is out. In other words, this procedure allows you to move to a different group without having to turn on [EDIT] indicator, and is a faster and more efficient way to get around. Moving the Cursor (underline) When two or more items are shown in a single display page, move the cursor (underline) to the item whose value you wish to set. Press to move the cursor to the left, or to move it to the right. fig.01-14 A symbol appearing in the upper right of the display indicates that there are other items in this page that the screen has no room to show. Press to see these items, and press to return to the previous page. fig.01-15 Remote Control of External Sequencers When any PLAY page is displayed, then by pressing the different CURSOR buttons while holding down [SHIFT], you can have remote start, stop, and other control functions of external sequencers connected to the XV-88. This is a useful and extremely convenient function to have in situations such as when playing ensemble using an external sequencer. [SHIFT] + (NEXT SONG): Selects the next song. [SHIFT] + (PREV SONG): Selects the previous song. [SHIFT] + (RESET): Returns to the beginning of the song. [SHIFT] + (START/STOP): Starts and stops performance of the song. When [SHIFT] is held down while (or ) is pressed, the song either before (or after) the Song Number set with the Song Number parameter (SYSTEM/INFO/TRANSMIT SONG SEL) is selected (p. 178). Some sequencers cannot be started or stopped without receiving the MIDI Clock (F8h), and settings on certain sequencers also cannot be changed. Please use a sequencer able to perform START/STOP without requiring reception of the MIDI Clock (F8h). For more detailed information, refer to the owner’s manual for your sequencer. Chapter 1. Overview of the XV-88 Modifying a Value < Example 1: To enter a value of 38 > To modify a value, use the VALUE dial, [INC/+]/[DEC/-] or [0]–[9] (numeric keys). fig.01-16Each parameter has a specific range, so you cannot set any value smaller than the minimum value or greater than the maximum value. VALUE Dial Rotating the VALUE dial clockwise increases the value, counterclockwise decreases the value. Holding down [SHIFT] as you move the VALUE dial increases value increments so you can make large value changes faster. [INC/+] and [DEC/-] Pressing [INC/+] increases the value, and [DEC/-] decreases it. Keep the button pressed for continuous adjustment. For faster value increases, keep [INC/+] pressed down and press [DEC/-]. For decreasing value faster, keep [DEC/-] pressed down and press [INC/+]. If you press [INC/+] or [DEC/-] while holding down [SHIFT], the value increments will get bigger. [0]–[9] (Numeric Keys) [0]–[9] (Numeric Keys) lets you directly specify a numerical value. When you enter the number, the value will blink. This indicates that the value has not yet been finalized. To finalize the value press the ENTER button. To reverse the sign of the number (+/-), hold down [SHIFT] and press [0]. Some parameters do not require you to press [ENTER] to finalize the value. Press [3] → press [8] → press [ENTER] < Example 2: To enter a value of -60 > While holding down [SHIFT] press [0] → press [6] → press [0] → press [ENTER] You can switch from a positive to negative numerical value anytime before you press [ENTER]. Restoring a Previous Value (Undo) If, after you change a value you decide that you want to go back to its original value (before you made the change), press [UNDO/COMPARE]. You can also put your change back in again by pressing the button once more. The Undo function can be used when making changes to settings in the sound generator section. This is convenient when you want to undo changes or when you want to compare the sound before and after a change is made. 27

28Chapter 1. Overview of the XV-88 Assigning a Name The XV-88 lets you assign names to Patches, Performances, and Rhythm Sets. The procedure is the same for any type of data. To assign a name, use / to move the cursor to the location where you wish to input a character. Then use the VALUE dial or [INC/+]/[DEC/-] or the Numeric Keys to input a character. Available characters/symbols: space, A–Z, a–z, 0–9, ! " # $ % & ’ ( ) * + , - . / : ; < = > ? @ [ \ ] ^ _ ` { | } Using the Numeric Keys The numeric keys are used to input the numerals printed on each key as well as the characters assigned to each key (see the table below). Each time you press a numeric key, the display will cycle through the numeral and characters printed above the key. To specify a lowercase character, hold down [SHIFT] as you press the numeric key. Numeric Key Character [1] A B C [2] D E F [3] G H I [4] J K L [5] M N O [6] P Q R [7] S T U [8] V W X [9] Y Z ! [0] space Convenient Functions While you are holding down [SHIFT], the screen will show three functions that are convenient when entering a name. To use each function, hold down [SHIFT] and press the appropriate function button. fig.01-17 A a: switch between uppercase/lowercase characters INS: insert a space at the cursor location DEL: delete the character at the cursor location

Chapter 2. Playing Playing in Patch Mode The sounds used for an ordinary performance are called Patches. Select a Patch before playing. Selecting a Patch The XV-88 has eight Patch groups, including the User group and Preset Groups A–F and H, with each group storing 128 Patches (256 in Preset H), for a total of 1,152 Patches. In addition to these, you can also select Patches stored on memory cards (SmartMedia). What’s more, you can further expand your options by installing up to four optional Wave Expansion boards (two SR-JV80, two SRX Series), enabling you to select from a huge assortment of available Patches. USER This is the group inside the XV-88 which can be rewritten. Patches you yourself create can be stored in this group. The XV-88 includes 128 preset Patches (p. 253). CD-A–H (Memory Card A–H) This is the group to accessed when using Patches stored on memory cards (SmartMedia) inserted in the MEMORY CARD slot. You can also rewrite Patches you create. Each bank A–H holds 128 Patches, meaning you can select from a maximum of 1,024 Patches. Patches in CD-A–H cannot be selected if no memory card (SmartMedia) is inserted in the MEMORY CARD slot. PR-A–F (Preset A–F) These are groups inside the XV-88 which cannot be rewritten. However, you can modify the settings of the currently selected Patch, and then save the modified settings in User memory or a memory card. Banks A–F already contain 128 prepared Patches each, for a total of 768 Patches (p. 253). PR-H (GM2) This is an internal group of Patches compatible with General MIDI 2, a system of MIDI function specifications designed to transcend differences between makers and types of devices; these Patches cannot be overwritten. Furthermore, settings of currently selected Patches from this group cannot be changed. The XV-88 includes 256 preset Patches. XP-A, B (Wave Expansion Boards installed in EXP-A, B Slots) These are the groups of Patches from Wave Expansion Boards (optional SR-JV80 Series) installed in the EXP-A and B slots, and cannot be overwritten. However, you can modify the settings of the currently selected Patch, and then save the modified settings in User memory or a memory card. The number of onboard Patches depends on the specific Wave Expansion Boards installed. XP-A, B Patches can be selected only if a Wave Expansion Board (SR-JV80 Series) is installed in the corresponding slot. XP-C, D (Wave Expansion Boards installed in EXP-C, D Slots) These are the groups of Patches from Wave Expansion Boards (optional SRX Series) installed in the EXP-C and D slots, and cannot be overwritten. However, you can modify the settings of the currently selected Patch, and then save the modified settings in User memory or a memory card. The number of onboard Patches depends on the specific Wave Expansion Boards installed. XP-C, D Patches can be selected only if a Wave Expansion Board (SRX Series) is installed in the corresponding slot. 1. Press [PATCH] to call up the PATCH PLAY page. fig.02-01.e Patch numberPatch group Patch name 2. Select a Patch group or a bank. USER Press [USER] to make the indicator light. CD-A–H Press [CARD], and then press [A]–[H] to make the indicator light. PR-A–F Press [PRESET], and then press [A]–[F] to make the indicator light. PR-H (GM2) Press [PRESET], and then press [H] to make the indicator light. XP-A–D Press [EXP], and then press [A]–[D] to make the indicator light. 29

30Chapter 2. Playing 3. Select the Patch number. Rotate the VALUE dial or press [INC/+]/[DEC/-] to select a Patch. You can also select the Patch number by using the numeric keys. In this case, after specifying the number using the numeric keys, press [ENTER]. Also, Using the Digit Hold function, a Patch number can be selected simply by specifying the 1’s place number. Express Patch Select (Digit Hold) With the Digit Hold function turned on, the 100’s position and 10’s position will be fixed when the numeric keys are used to select a Patch. This means that the numeric keys will only change the 1’s position, and you won’t have to press [ENTER] for each selection. The same applies to selecting Performances and Rhythm Sets. 1. Hold down [SHIFT] and press [0] (numeric key). The Digit Hold function is now turned on. fig.02-02The numbers in the 100’s position and 10’s position will be displayed in a smaller size to indicate Digit Hold is on. 2. When you enter a numeric key number, the 1’s position will change immediately without having to press [ENTER]. 3. To turn off Digit Hold, hold down [SHIFT] and press [0] once again. Selecting Patches by Category (Patch Finder) The XV-88 provides a “Patch Search function” (Patch Finder) which allows you to specify a type (category) of Patch so that you can quickly find the desired Patch. There are a total of 38 categories. 1. Press [PATCH] to call up the PATCH PLAY page. 2. Press [PATCH FINDER] to turn the Patch Finder function on. The patch number display will change to the category display. fig.02-03 3. Press or to select the desired category. Here, you can change the Category group by pressing the numeric keys. 4. Rotate the VALUE dial or press [INC/+]/[DEC/-] to choose a Patch in the currently selected category. 5. Press [PATCH FINDER] to turn the Patch Search function off. You will return to the normal PATCH PLAY page. In Step 3, the CATEGORY SELECT page is displayed by holding down [PATCH FINDER] and pressing the numeric keys. In this page, you can select the desired Category from a list of Categories belonging to each Category group. fig.02-04Rotate the VALUE dial or press [INC/+]/[DEC/-] to select a category, and then press [ENTER] to confirm the selection. You can also select a category directly by pressing the corresponding numeric key. Chapter 2. Playing The following categories can be selected. Category Group Category Contents Selecting Favorite Patches from the Favorite List --- NO ASSIGN No assign Piano PNO AC.PIANO Acoustic Piano EP EL.PIANO Electric Piano Keys&OrganKEY KEYBOARDS Other Keyboards (Clav, Harpsichord etc.) BEL BELL Bell, Bell Pad MLT MALLET Mallet ORG ORGAN Electric and Church Organ ACD ACCORDION Accordion HRM HARMONICA Harmonica, Blues Harp Guitar AGT AC.GUITAR Acoustic Guitar EGT EL.GUITAR Electric Guitar DGT DIST.GUITAR Distortion Guitar Bass BS BASS Acoustic & Electric Bass SBS SYNTH BASS Synth Bass Orchestral STR STRINGS Strings ORC ORCHESTRA Orchestra Ensemble HIT HIT&STAB Orchestra Hit, Hit WND WIND Winds (Oboe, Clarinet etc.) FLT FLUTE Flute, Piccolo Brass BRS AC.BRASS Acoustic Brass SBR SYNTH BRASS Synth Brass SAX SAX Sax Synth HLD HARD LEAD Hard Synth Lead SLD SOFT LEAD Soft Synth Lead TEK TECHNO SYNTH Techno Synth PLS PULSATING Pulsating Synth FX SYNTH FX Synth FX (Noise etc.) SYN OTHER SYNTH Poly Synth Pad BPD BRIGHT PAD Bright Pad Synth SPD SOFT PAD Soft Pad Synth VOX VOX Vox, Choir Ethnic PLK PLUCKED Plucked (Harp etc.) ETH ETHNIC Other Ethnic FRT FRETTED Fretted Inst (Mandolin etc.) Rhythm&SFXPRC PERCUSSION Percussion SFX SOUND FX Sound FX BTS BEAT&GROOVE Beat and Groove DRM DRUMS Drum Set CMB COMBINATION Other Patches which use Split and Layer On the XV-88, you can bring together your favorite and most frequently used Patches in one place by registering them in the Favorite List. The Favorite List gives you immediate access to your favorite Patches wherever they are stored, whether in the XV-88 itself, on Wave Expansion Boards, or on memory cards. If you have saved Patches located on Wave Expansion Boards or memory cards onto the Favorite List, and then attempt to select one of the saved Patches without having the corresponding Wave Expansion Board installed, or the relevant memory card inserted, “No media” appears in the display, and the selected Patch cannot be played. For instructions on how to register to the Favorite List, refer to “Registering Favorite Patches/Rhythm Sets in the Favorite List” (p. 165). 1. Press [PATCH] to call up the PATCH PLAY page. 2. While holding down [SHIFT], press [PATCH FINDER]. The FAVORITE LIST page will appear. fig.02-05 3. Rotate the VALUE dial or press [INC/+]/[DEC/-] to select a Patch. 4. When you press [ENTER], the Patch is selected and you are returned to the PATCH PLAY page. 31

32Chapter 2. Playing Using Phrase Preview to Play Patches The XV-88 allows you to preview Patches by hearing a phrase appropriate for each type of Patch. 1. Select a Patch (p. 29). 2. Press and hold [PHRASE PREVIEW]. • In Performance mode, only the Patches of the currently selected Part (current Part) will sound. In Rhythm Set mode, a drum phrase will sound. • Patches of the USER group or from an optional Wave Expansion Board (SR-JV80 Series and SRX Series) may not sound at the appropriate pitch range. If this occurs, press [+OCT] or [-OCT] to select the desired pitch range (Octave Shift p. 47). • If the pitch range of a Phrase is wider than the range of the Tones within a Patch (p. 73), or wider than the range of a Part within a Performance (p. 51), any notes in the Phrase that fall outside that range will not be heard. 3. Release your finger from [PHRASE PREVIEW], and the phrase will stop playing. 4. To change the way in which the phrase is played, press [SYSTEM] to make the indicator light. Then press the [PREVIEW] function button, and press or to access the SYSTEM PREVIEW page. fig.09-21 5. Rotate the VALUE dial, or press [INC/+]/[DEC/-] to make the setting. Preview Mode (Preview Sound Mode) SINGLE: The notes specified by Note 1–4 parameter (SYSTEM/PREVIEW/PREVIEW KEY) will sound successively one by one. CHORD: The notes specified by Note 1–4 parameter (SYSTEM/PREVIEW/PREVIEW KEY) will sound simultaneously. PHRASE: The Phrase associated with the Patch’s type/ category is played. For details on the Note 1–4 parameter settings, refer to “Phrase Preview Settings (PREVIEW)” (p. 177). 6. Press [EXIT] to return to the PATCH PLAY page. 7. If you set the Preview Mode parameter to PHRASE in step 5, you can specify the phrase that will sound. After pressing [EDIT] to make the indicator light up, press the [COMMON] function button, and press or to display the PATCH CATEGORY page. fig.05-08 8. Rotate the VALUE dial or press [INC/+]/[DEC/-] to make the setting. For details on the available categories, refer to (p. 31). The Patch Finder function uses this setting. Making a Patch Sound Thick or Thin (Turning a Tone On/Off) Since a Patch is a combination of up to four Tones, you can switch unwanted (Tones out of the four) off and get just the sound of a specific Tone. 1. Make sure that the PATCH PLAY page is displayed. 2. Make sure that [EDIT] indicator is extinguished. If it is lit, press [EDIT]. At this time, the on/off setting of each Tone in the displayed Patch will be shown by the indicators of TONE SWITCH [1]–[4]. Lit is on, and dark is off. The PATCH PLAY page indicates the Tones that are on as follows. Tones that are off are shown as -. fig.02-06 3. Use TONE SWITCH [1]–[4] to switch Tones on/off. This setting is linked with the Switch parameter (PATCH/WAVE/WAVE). If you want just one or two Tones to sound in a Patch, turn the others off and store that setting on a Patch. This cuts nonessential use of the XV-88’s simultaneous voices. Chapter 2. Playing Playing Single Notes (Solo) Normally, the XV-88 allows you to play chords. Pressing [SOLO] allows performance using single notes. This function is effective when performing a solo using single-note Patches like sax and flute. Creating Smooth Pitch Changes (Portamento) Portamento ensures a smooth pitch changeover from one note to the next note played. When [SOLO] is on (indicator lights), you can simulate techniques like violin glissandos. 1. Make sure that the PATCH PLAY page is displayed. 2. Press [SOLO] so its indicator lights. Now you can play a solo. 3. Play the XV-88 keyboard. During Layer Performance, the [SOLO] indicator goes out each time you change the Performance. Also, the [SOLO] indicator does not reflect Mono/Poly mode- switching information received from an external MIDI device. 1. Make sure that the PATCH PLAY page is displayed. 2. Press [PORTAMENTO]. Its indicator lights. You’re ready to play portamento. 3. To change the portamento settings, press [EDIT] to make the indicator light. Then press the [CONTROL] function button, and press or to access the PATCH PORTAMNT page. fig.05-34 4. Press the cursor buttons to move the cursor over to “Time,” “Mode,” “Type” or “Start.”

See (p. 76) for each parameter’s functions. 5. Rotate the VALUE dial or press [INC/+]/[DEC/-] to get the value you want. 6. Press [EXIT] to return to the PATCH PLAY page and play. During Layer Performance, the [PORTAMENTO] indicator goes out each time you change the Performance. Also, the [PORTAMENTO] indicator does not reflect Portamento on/off-switching information received from an external MIDI device. 33 34Chapter 2. Playing Using the Sliders to Modify the Sound in Realtime With the four sliders (Palette Slider) in the PALETTE section, you can create sound variations or volume changes in realtime. The sound character and volume changes created using the sliders can be transmitted to the external MIDI devices (p. 170). Changing Sound Characters 1. Make sure that the PATCH PLAY page is displayed. 2. Press [FILTER/ENV] to light its indicator. 3. Move the sliders while you play the XV-88’s keyboard to vary the sound. To modify the brightness, move the [CUTOFF] slider. To change resonance, move the [RESONANCE] slider. To change attack time, move the [ATTACK] slider. To change release time, move the [RELEASE] slider. Changing the Volume of Each Tone 1. Make sure that the PATCH PLAY page is displayed. 2. Press [LEVEL] to light its indicator. 3. Move the LEVEL slider as you play the keyboard to adjust volume as desired. Sliders 1, 2, 3, and 4 are used to change the volume of Tones 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Playing in Performance Mode There are two types of performances: Layer Performances and Single Performances. The upper right of the display will indicate “LAYER p * ” (* is the Part number) for a Layer Performance, and “part= * ” (* is the Part number) for a Single Performance. About the MIDI Connection Settings (Zone and Part) Although the XV-88’s keyboard controller section and sound generator section are connected internally using a MIDI connection, in Layer Performance mode, you can then make even more detailed settings affecting the way the connection works between the keyboard controller section and the sound generator section, as well as with an external MIDI device. At the factory settings, shown below, there is a one-to- one correspondence between the Zone, the MIDI Transmit/Receive channel, and the Part. <Layer Performance> fig.01-07.e Zone 16 (MIDI transmit channel 16) Part 16 (MIDI receive channel 16) Zone 2 (MIDI transmit channel 2) Part 2 (MIDI receive channel 2) Zone 1 (MIDI transmit channel 1) Part 1 (MIDI receive channel 1) Patch/ Rhythm Set Under these conditions, you could simply consider that “each of the Zones from 1 to 16 is linked in a one-to- one relationship with its numerical counterpart among Parts 1 to 16”. In other words, you can use Zone 1 when controlling Part 1, Zone 2 is when controlling Part 2, and so on. We recommend that under normal circumstances you use the default factory settings. In this manual, the expression “the Zone and Part are linked” refers to the condition whereby a Zone’s MIDI transmit channel and a Part’s MIDI receive channel are matched in this one-to-one relationship. The explanations in this section describe how to play Performances using the factory Zone settings.

Chapter 2. Playing <Layer Performance> CD-A–H (Memory Card A–H) In a Layer Performance, you can select multiple Zones, and play those Zones and their linked Parts simultaneously. Select Layer Performance if you want fat, rich sounds of two or more Patches, or want to play different Patches in a split keyboard’s different sections. <Single Performance> With a Single Performance, you can play the currently selected Part (current Part). This means that you can use it to do things like playing just a single part in a song that uses a number of instruments. Zone settings are ignored. Also, if another Part is set to the same MIDI Receive channel as the currently selected Part, that Part is also played. The Single Performance and Layer Performance settings are selected with the Key Mode parameter (ZONE/ COMMON/ZONE COMMON). The Key Mode parameter determines how the XV-88 keyboard will play the internal sound generator. It has no effect on how the XV-88 sound generator is played from an external MIDI device. You can toggle between SINGLE and LAYER directly from the PERFORM PLAY page by pressing [SOLO] while holding down [SHIFT]. Selecting a Performance The XV-88 has three Performance groups, including the User group and Preset Groups A, B, with 64 Performances in the User group and 32 each in Presets A and B, for a total of 128 Performances. In addition to these, you can also select Performances stored on memory cards (SmartMedia). USER This is the group inside the XV-88 which can be rewritten. Performances you yourself create can be stored in this group. The XV-88 contains 64 preset Performances (p. 252). This is the group to accessed when using Performances stored on memory cards (SmartMedia) inserted in the MEMORY CARD slot. You can also rewrite Performances you create. Each bank A–H holds 64 Performances, meaning you can select from a maximum of 512 Performances. Performances in CD-A–H cannot be selected if no memory card (SmartMedia) is inserted in the MEMORY CARD slot. PR-A, B (Preset A, B) These are groups inside the XV-88 which cannot be rewritten. However, you can modify the settings of the currently selected Performance, and then save the modified settings in User memory or a memory card. Banks A and B already contain 32 prepared Performances each, for a total of 64 Performances (p. 252). 1. Press [PERFORM] to call up the PERFORM PLAY page. fig.02-07.e 2. Select a Performance group or Bank. USER Press [USER] to make the indicator light. CD-A–H Press [CARD], and then press [A]–[H] to make the indicator light. PR-A, B Press [PRESET], and then press [A] or [B] to make the indicator light. 3. Select the Performance number. Select by either rotating the VALUE dial or by pressing [INC/+]/[DEC/-]. You can also select the Performance number by using the numeric keys. In this case, after specifying the number using the numeric keys, press [ENTER]. Also, Using the Digit Hold function, a Performance number can be selected simply by specifying the 1’s place number (p. 30). Performance number Performance number Performance group Performance group 35

36Chapter 2. Playing Playing Fatter and Richer Sounds by Combining Patches (Layer) In a Layer Performance, the Zones whose Local switches are set to ON along with all linked Parts can be played. Combining the Parts will produce, thicker, fatter sounds. fig.02-08.e 1. Make sure the PERFORM PLAY page is displayed. 2. Make sure that the upper right of the display indicates “LAYER p * ”(* is the Part number). If the display indicates “part= * ” (* is the Part number), the performance is a “Single Performance,” so hold down [SHIFT] and press [SOLO] to change to a Layer Performance. The setting here is linked to the Key Mode parameter (ZONE/COMMON/ZONE COMMON) (p. 58). 3. Confirm that the [EDIT] and [LOCAL/TX] indicators are extinguished, and, press a Function button to select the Zone linked to the Part you want played, lighting the button’s indicator. When the [1-8/9-16] indicator is out, zones 1–8 can be selected, and when the [1-8/9-16] indicator is lit, zones 9–16 can be selected. The Local Switch for the selected zone will be turned ON. At the factory settings, there is a one-to-one correspondence between each of the Zones 1–16 and Parts 1–16. The setting here is linked to the setting at the Local parameter (ZONE/MIDI/MIDI) (p. 60). 4. Repeat Step 3 to set the Local switch to ON for all Zones linked to the Parts you want to have play. Splitting the Keyboard to Play Separate Patches in Different Sections (Split) If you’ve selected a Layer Performance, you can split the keyboard to play separate Patches with different sections of the keyboard. As the note range that plays each Zone can be Part 1 Part 2 (Rx ch.1) (Rx ch.2) Part 15 Part 16 (Rx ch.15) (Rx ch.16) specified individually, you can split the keyboard into a maximum of 16 sections. For instance, you can play strings in the lower range, piano in the upper range, and both sounds in the middle range. fig.02-09.e Local Switch: On Zone 1 (Tx ch.1) Part 1: Strings Part 1 + Part 2: Part 2: Piano Zone 2 (Tx ch.2) (Strings + Piano) Zone 15 (Tx ch.15) Zone 16 (Tx ch.16) • If a Patch key range is set in the KEY RANG page (PATCH/COMMON), sounds are produced in the overlapping sections between the key ranges specified for the Patch and Performance. fig.02-10.e Key range specified for Performance Key range specified for Patch The range in which notes will play • Although you can set the key range of each Part in the KEY RANG page (PERFORM/COMMON) (p. 51), when performing with the XV-88’s keyboard, we recommend setting the key range of each Zone, as explained here, rather than setting the key range for each Part. 1. Make sure the PERFORM PLAY page is displayed. 2. Make sure that the upper right of the display indicates “LAYER p * ”(* is the Part number). If the display indicates “part= * ” (* is the Part number), the performance is a “Single Performance,” so hold down [SHIFT] and press [SOLO] to change to a Layer Performance. The setting here is linked to the Key Mode parameter (ZONE/COMMON/ZONE COMMON) (p. 58). 3. Confirm that the [EDIT] and [LOCAL/TX] indicators are extinguished, and, press a Function button to select the Zone linked to the Part you want played, lighting the button’s indicator. When the [1-8/9-16] indicator is out, zones 1–8 can be selected, and when the [1-8/9-16] indicator is lit, zones 9–16 can be selected. The Local Switch for the selected zone will be turned ON. At the factory settings, there is a one-to-one correspondence between each of the Zones 1–16 and Parts 1–16. The setting here is linked to the setting at the Local parameter (ZONE/MIDI/MIDI) (p. 60). 4. Repeat Step 3 to set the Local switch to ON for all Zones linked to the Parts you want to have play. 5. Press [ZONE], getting the indicator to light, and then press the [KEY RANGE] function button to access the KEY RANG page. fig.04-07 6. Turn off the [EDIT] indicator, and press a Function button to select the Zone whose Local switch is set to ON. When the [1-8/9-16] indicator is out, zones 1–8 can be selected, and when the [1-8/9-16] indicator is lit, zones 9–16 can be selected. 7. Specifies the keyboard range for the Zone. Use the cursor buttons to move the cursor to “Lower” and set the lowest note of the range. Move the cursor to “Upper” and set the highest note of the range. 8. Rotate the VALUE dial or press [INC/+]/[DEC/-] to specify the range of notes. By specifying sections for different Zones so that they overlap each other, you can combine two or more Patches only in a specific section. 9. When you are finished making settings, press [EXIT] to return to the PERFORM PLAY page, and begin playing. Playing Along with Song Playback (XV-88 Used as a Multi-timbral Sound Generator) In a Single Performance, you can sound the single specified Part (current Part), making this convenient in such situations as when performing along with songs. fig.02-11.e Selecting a Part You Want to Play on the Keyboard If a Single Performance is selected, press Function button to select the Part you want to play. The selected Part is called the Current Part. 1. Make sure the PERFORM PLAY page is displayed. 2. Confirm that the [EDIT] indicator is extinguished, and press the Function button to select the Part you want to play using the keyboard. When the [1-8/9-16] indicator is out, Parts 1–8 can be selected, and when the [1-8/9-16] indicator is lit, Parts 9–16 can be selected. The Part number shown in the upper right of the display will change. fig.02-12 • The keyboard controller’s performance data will be transmitted on the same MIDI channel as the MIDI Receive channel that is set for the current Part. (Tx ch.1) Chapter 2 Chapter 2 Chapter 2

• You can also select the Part by pressing or .

Part 1 (Rx ch.1) Part 2 (Rx ch.2) Chapter 2. Playing Part 15 (Rx ch.15) Part 15 (Rx ch.15) Part 16 (Rx ch.16) Part 16 (Rx ch.16) Part 16 (Rx ch.16)

37 38Chapter 2. Playing Muting a Specific Part (Turning Receive Switch On/Off) While you play along with the playback of a song, you can turn on/off any specific Part. This allows you to turn off the melody Part for karaoke applications or for practicing the muted Part. 1. Make sure that [EDIT] indicator is extinguished. If it is lit, press [EDIT]. In this case, by holding down [SHIFT], you can check Function button indicators to see the ON/OFF status of each Part’s Receive switch. When [1-8/9-16] indicator is out, the function button indicators will indicate the status of Parts 1–8. When [1-8/9-16] indicator is lit, the function button indicators will indicate the status of Parts 9–16. Lit is on, and dark is off. 2. Hold down [SHIFT] and press the function button to switch the Receive switch on/off. This setting is linked with the Rx Sw parameter (PERFORM/MIDI/MIDI) (p. 52). Assigning a Different Patch to a Part The Patch assigned to each Part can be stored as a Performance parameter. 1. Make sure the PERFORM PLAY page is displayed. 2. While holding down [PERFORM], press [PATCH] to call up the PLAY page (PART PLAY) of the Patch assigned to a specific Part. fig.02-13The upper right of the display will indicate the number of the currently selected part. 3. Press or to choose the Part to which the selected Patch is assigned. 4. Use the same procedure as in Patch mode to select a Patch (p. 29). This setting is linked with the Group and Number parameter (PERFORM/PART/PATCH) (p. 53). • Using the Patch Finder function, you can rapidly find the desired Patch (p. 30). • By using the Phrase Preview function, you can audition patches by listening to a preset phrase suitable for the selected type of patch (p. 32). 5. Press [PERFORM] or [EXIT] to return to the PERFORM PLAY page. By pressing [RHYTHM] in Step 4, you can substitute a Rhythm Set for the Patch assigned to the Part. Using the Sliders to Modify the Sound in Realtime With the four sliders in the PALETTE section (the Palette sliders), you can change the sound qualities of the Patches assigned to the Parts and adjust the volume level of each Part.The sound character and volume changes created using the sliders can be transmitted to the external MIDI devices (p. 59). Changing Sound Characters When selecting a Single Performance, the effect is applied to the single specified Part (current Part). When a Layer Performance is selected, the effect is applied to all Zones with Local switches set to ON and their linked Parts. 1. Make sure the PERFORM PLAY page is displayed. 2. Press [FILTER/ENV] and its indicator lights. 3. Move the sliders while you play the XV-88’s keyboard to vary the sound. To modify the brightness, move the [CUTOFF] slider. To change resonance, move the [RESONANCE] slider. To change attack time, move the [ATTACK] slider. To change release time, move the [RELEASE] slider. Adjusting the Volume Balance Between Parts 1. Make sure the PERFORM PLAY page is displayed. 2. Press [LEVEL] and its indicator lights. 3. Press or to select the Part whose volume you want to change. If you’ve selected any of Parts 1-4, sliders [1], [2], [3], and [4] adjust Parts 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. If you’ve selected any of Parts 5-8, sliders [1], [2], [3], and [4] adjust Parts 5, 6, 7, and 8, respectively. If you’ve selected any of Parts 9-12, sliders [1], [2], [3], and [4] adjust Parts 9, 10, 11, and 12, respectively. If you’ve selected any of Parts 13-16, sliders [1], [2], [3], and [4] adjust Parts 13, 14, 15, and 16, respectively. 4. Move the slider as you play to adjust the level (volume) of each Part as desired. If the MIDI Receive channels for multiple Parts are set to the same value, the volume levels of several Parts could change at the same time. Chapter 2. Playing Playing in Rhythm Set Mode In Rhythm Set mode, you can play percussion instruments (Rhythm Tones) on the keyboard. As the Rhythm Tone assigned to each key varies by the Rhythm Set selected, you 2 r etpahCcan play a wide range of percussion instruments. Selecting a Rhythm Set The XV-88 has eight Rhythm Set groups, including the User group and Preset Groups A–F and H, with 4 Rhythm Sets in the User group, 2 each in Presets A–F, and 9 Rhythm Sets in Preset H, for a total of 25 Rhythm Sets. In addition to these, you can also select Rhythm Sets stored on memory cards (SmartMedia). What’s more, you can further expand your options by installing up to four optional Wave Expansion boards (two SR-JV80, two SRX Series), enabling you to select from a large selection of Rhythm Sets. USER This is the group inside the XV-88 which can be rewritten. Rhythm Sets you yourself create can be stored in this group. The XV-88 includes four preset Rhythm Sets (p. 258). CD-A–H (Memory Card A–H) This is the group to accessed when using Rhythm Sets stored on memory cards (SmartMedia) inserted in the MEMORY CARD slot. You can also rewrite Rhythm Sets you create. Each bank A–H holds 4 Rhythm Sets, meaning you can select from a maximum of 32 Rhythm Sets. Rhythm Sets in CD-A–H cannot be selected if no memory card (SmartMedia) is inserted in the MEMORY CARD slot. PR-A–F (Presets A–F) These are groups inside the XV-88 which cannot be rewritten. However, you can modify the settings of the currently selected Rhythm Set, and then save the modified settings in User memory or a memory card. Banks A–F already contain 2 prepared Rhythm Sets each, for a total of 12 Rhythm Sets (p. 258). PR-H (GM2) This is an internal group of Rhythm Sets compatible with General MIDI 2, a system of MIDI function specifications designed to transcend differences between makers and types of devices; these Rhythm Sets cannot be overwritten. Furthermore, settings of currently selected Rhythm Sets from this group cannot be changed. The XV-88 includes 9 preset Rhythm Sets. 39 40Chapter 2. Playing XP-A, B (Wave Expansion Boards installed in EXP-A, B Slots) These are the groups of Rhythm Sets from Wave Expansion Boards (optional SR-JV80 Series) installed in the EXP-A and B slots, and cannot be overwritten. However, you can modify the settings of the currently selected Rhythm Set, and then save the modified settings in User memory or a memory card. The number of onboard Rhythm Sets depends on the specific Wave Expansion Boards installed. XP-A, B Rhythm Sets can be selected only if a Wave Expansion Board (SR-JV80 Series) is installed in the corresponding slot. XP-C, D (Wave Expansion Boards installed in EXP-C, D Slots) These are the groups of Rhythm Sets from Wave Expansion Boards (optional SRX Series) installed in the EXP-C and D slots, and cannot be overwritten. However, you can modify the settings of the currently selected Rhythm Set, and then save the modified settings in User memory or a memory card. The number of onboard Rhythm Sets depends on the specific Wave Expansion Boards installed. XP-C, D Rhythm Sets can be selected only if a Wave Expansion Board (SRX Series) is installed in the corresponding slot. 1. Press [RHYTHM] to call up the RHYTHM PLAY page. fig.02-14.e 2. Select a Rhythm Set group or Bank. USER Press [USER] to make the indicator light. CD-A–H Press [CARD], and then press [A]–[H] to make the indicator light. PR-A–F Press [PRESET], and then press [A]–[F] to make the indicator light. PR-H (GM2) Press [PRESET], and then press [H] to make the indicator light. Rhythm Set number Rhythm Set group Rhythm Set name XP-A–D Press [EXP], and then press [A]–[D] to make the indicator light. 3. Select the Rhythm Set number. Rotate the VALUE dial or press [INC/+]/[DEC/-] to select the number. You can also select the Rhythm Set number by using the numeric keys. In this case, after specifying the number using the numeric keys, press [ENTER]. Also, Using the Digit Hold function, a Rhythm Set number can be selected simply by specifying the 1’s place number (p. 30). Selecting Favorite Rhythm Sets from the Favorite List On the XV-88, you can bring together your favorite and most frequently used Rhythm Sets in one place by registering them in the Favorite List. The Favorite List gives you immediate access to your favorite Rhythm Sets wherever they are stored, whether in the XV-88 itself, on Wave Expansion Boards, or on memory cards. If you have saved Rhythm Sets located on Wave Expansion Boards or memory cards onto the Favorite List, and then attempt to select one of the saved Rhythm Sets without having the corresponding Wave Expansion Board installed, or the relevant memory card inserted, “No media” appears in the display, and the selected Rhythm Set cannot be played. For instructions on how to register to the Favorite List, refer to “Registering Favorite Patches/Rhythm Sets in the Favorite List” (p. 165). 1. Press [PATCH] to call up the RHYTHM PLAY page. 2. While holding down [SHIFT], press [PATCH FINDER]. The FAVORITE LIST page will appear. fig.02-05 3. Rotate the VALUE dial or press [INC/+]/[DEC/-] to select a Rhythm Set. 4. When you press [ENTER], the Rhythm Set is selected and you are returned to the RHYTHM PLAY page. Chapter 2. Playing Playing Percussion Instruments 1. Press [RHYTHM] to call up the RHYTHM PLAY page. 2. Select a desired Rhythm Set. 3. Press a key on the keyboard to play a percussion 2 r etpahCinstrument. The key (Note name) you press and its percussion instrument name (Rhythm Tone name) will be displayed below the Rhythm Set name. fig.02-15.e You can also select a key to be displayed by using TONE SELECT [1]–[4]. TONE SELECT [1]: move to an octave lower key TONE SELECT [2]: move to the semitone below TONE SELECT [3]: move to the semitone above TONE SELECT [4]: move to an octave higher key Playing Arpeggios (Arpeggiator) The Arpeggiator provides for the play of the various notes in chords. The XV-88’s Arpeggiator lets you produce an arpeggio (broken chord) simply by playing a chord. In addition to normal arpeggios, you can also accurately simulate rhythm guitar or strumming techniques depending on the Arpeggiator settings. The Arpeggiator can in fact be used as a handy automatic arranger. By pressing [ARPEGGIO], the indicator lights and allows playing arpeggios from the XV-88 keyboard. If you press [ARPEGGIO] to turn this function on when a Single Performance is selected, the single specified Part (current Part) will play arpeggios. When a Layer Performance is selected, an arpeggio will sound for the Zone specified by the Zone parameter (ZONE/ ARPEGGIO/ARPEGGIO). The arpeggios played by the arpeggiator can be transmitted from the MIDI OUT connector to external MIDI devices (p. 59). 1. Make sure that the PLAY page of the sound generator mode (PERFORM, PATCH, RHYTHM, or GM) is displayed. 2. Press [ARPEGGIO] to turn the Arpeggiator on. 3. If you wish to change how the arpeggio is played, hold down [ARPEGGIO] to access the ARP SELECT page, move the cursor to “Style,” and change the setting. fig.02-16This setting is linked with the Style parameter. In Patch/Rhythm Set/GM Mode Style parameter (SYSTEM/ARPEGGIO/ARPEGGIO) (p. 174) In Performance Mode Style parameter (ZONE/ARPEGGIO/ARPEGGIO) (p. 61) Note name Rhythm Tone name 41 42Chapter 2. Playing There are 45 arpeggio styles available. For selection, refer to the following guideline. Playing an Arpeggio According to the Timing Interval of a Note 1/4–1/32 Playing a Glissando GLISSANDO Playing a Bass Part SYNTH BASS, HEAVY SLAP, LIGHT SLAP, WALK BASS Playing a Guitar RHYTHM GTR 1–5, 3 FINGER, STRUM GTR DOWN, STRUM GTR UP, STRUM GTR UP&DN Playing a Keyboard Instrument PIANO BACKING, CLAVI CHORD Playing a Waltz WALTZ, SWING WALTZ Playing in Reggae Style REGGAE Playing Percussion Instruments PERCUSSION There are also other styles besides the above, including those used for random play and for creating your own styles. For details regarding each style, refer to “Arpeggiator Settings (ARPEGGIO)” (p. 61, p. 174). 4. To change the “groove” feel of the arpeggio, hold down [ARPEGGIO] to access the ARP SELECT page, move the cursor to “Accent,” and change the setting. fig.02-17A setting of 100% will produce the most pronounced groove feel. This setting is linked with the Accent Rate parameter. In Patch/Rhythm Set/GM Mode Accent Rate parameter (SYSTEM/ARPEGGIO/ ARPEGGIO) (p. 176) In Performance Mode Accent Rate parameter (ZONE/ARPEGGIO/ ARPEGGIO) (p. 62) 5. To change the range in which the arpeggio is played, hold down [ARPEGGIO] to access the ARP SELECT page, move the cursor to “Oct,” and change the setting. fig.02-18If you want the arpeggio to sound using only the notes that you actually play, set this to 0. With a +1 setting, arpeggio will take place over a range up to 1 octave higher than the notes you play. A -1 setting will result in arpeggio occurring over the range down to 1 octave lower than the notes you play. This setting is linked with the Octave Range parameter. In Patch/Rhythm Set/GM Mode Octave Range parameter (SYSTEM/ARPEGGIO/ ARPEGGIO) (p. 175) In Performance Mode Octave Range parameter (ZONE/ARPEGGIO/ ARPEGGIO) (p. 61) 6. To change the tempo in which the arpeggio is played, hold down [ARPEGGIO] to access the ARP SELECT display, move the cursor to “Tempo,” and change the setting. fig.02-19This setting is linked with the Tempo parameter. In Patch/Rhythm Set/GM Mode Tempo parameter (SYSTEM/ARPEGGIO/ARPEGGIO) (p. 176) In Performance Mode Tempo parameter (ZONE/ARPEGGIO/ARPEGGIO) (p. 63) 7. Play a chord to produce an arpeggio. 8. To stop the arpeggio, press [ARPEGGIO], extinguishing the indicator. If you hold down [SHIFT] when you press [ARPEGGIO], the ARP SELECT page will continue being displayed, without you having to hold down [ARPEGGIO]. To go back to the previous display, press [EXIT].

Chapter 2. Playing Playing an Arpeggio Over a Preset Keyboard Area As soon as you press [ARPEGGIO] to turn the Arpeggiator on, the keyboard will be set to play arpeggios so conventional keyboard playing is no longer possible. If you split the keyboard into two different areas, you can use one area for normal playing and the other for playing arpeggios. This setting, for instance, allows you to play arpeggios with the left hand and a melody with the right hand. 1. Press [PERFORM] to call up the PERFORM PLAY page. 2. If you have selected a Single Performance, set the Key 11.Set the key range of the Zones linked to the Parts other than the Part for which arpeggios are played so that this range does not overlap with the key range over which the arpeggios are played. 12.When you are finished making settings, press [EXIT] to return to the PERFORM PLAY page, and begin playing. If you play arpeggios using a Layer Performance without setting the key range, then with Parts other than the Part linked to the Zone specified by the Zone parameter (ZONE/ARPEGGIO/ARPEGGIO), only the sound for the key being pressed is played. Mode parameter (ZONE/COMMON/ZONE COMMON) to LAYER (p. 58). 3. Set the Local switch of the Zone linked to the Part you want played to ON (p. 36). 4. After pressing [ZONE] to make the indicator light up, press the [ARPEGGIO] function button followed by to display the ARPEGGIO page like the one shown below. fig.04-14 5. Use the cursor buttons to move the cursor to “Zone.” 6. Rotate the VALUE dial or press [INC/+]/[DEC/-] to select the Zone linked to the Part for which arpeggios are to be played. 7. Press [KEY RANGE] in the Function buttons to display the KEY RANG page. fig.04-07 8. Set the key range (expression range) for the Zone. Use the cursor buttons to move the cursor to “Lower” and set the lowest note of the range. Move the cursor to “Upper” and set the highest note of the range. 9. Rotate the VALUE dial or press [INC/+]/[DEC/-] to specify the range of notes. 10.Turn off the [EDIT] indicator, and press a Function button to select a Zone linked to a Part other than the one for which arpeggios are played. When the [1-8/9-16] indicator is out, you can select zones 1–8. When the [1-8/ 9-16] indicator is lit, you can select zones 9–16. Holding an Arpeggio If you hold down [ARPEGGIO] and press [TRANSPOSE], and get the indicator to start blinking, the arpeggio will continue to be played even if you release the chord. 1. Hold down [ARPEGGIO] and press [TRANSPOSE] to make the indicator blink. 2. Play a chord. 3. If you play a different chord or notes while the arpeggio is being held, the arpeggio will change accordingly. 4. To cancel Arpeggio Hold, hold down [ARPEGGIO] and press [TRANSPOSE] simultaneously once again. When Using a Hold Pedal If you play an arpeggio while pressing the hold pedal, the arpeggio will continue to be played even if you release the chord. 2. Press [ARPEGGIO] to turn the Arpeggiator on. 3. Play a chord while pressing the hold pedal. 4. To play another chord, release the pedal, press it again as you play the next chord.

1. Connect an optional pedal switch (DP-2, DP-6, etc.) to the HOLD PEDAL jack. 43 44Chapter 2. Playing Simulating a Rhythm Guitar You can simulate a rhythm guitar by following the procedure below. By using the Palette Slider, it is also possible to apply a wah effect as you play. 1. Select a guitar Patch. 2. Press [ARPEGGIO] to turn the Arpeggiator on. 3. Set the Style parameter (SYSTEM/ARPEGGIO/ ARPEGGIO) to one of RHYTHM GTR 2–5. 4. Press [FILTER/ENV] to make the indicator light. 5. Move the [CUTOFF] slider or [RESONANCE] slider while you play a chord. Playing an Arpeggio from an External MIDI Device The XV-88 can also produce arpeggios with incoming Note messages from an external MIDI device. 1. Use a MIDI cable to connect the MIDI IN connector of the XV-88 to the MIDI OUT connector of the external MIDI device. 2. Press [PATCH] to access the PATCH PLAY page. 3. Press [ARPEGGIO] to turn the Arpeggiator on. 4. Press [SYSTEM] to make the indicator lit, press the [MIDI] function button, and then press to access the PATCH MIDI page. fig.09-06 5. Use the cursor buttons to move the cursor to “Remote.” 6. Rotate the VALUE dial or press [INC/+]/[DEC/-] to turn the setting ON. 7. Play the external MIDI device. Creating an Arpeggio Pattern There are a total of 9 parameters that can be set for the Arpeggiator, but the most important is the Style parameter setting. The arpeggio pattern is largely determined by this setting. When you set the Style parameter, the Motif, Beat Pattern, Accent Rate and Shuffle Rate parameters will automatically be set to optimum settings. After selecting the style, you can also set parameters such as Octave Range and Key Velocity. If this selection does not provide the pattern you want, modify the settings of the Motif, Beat Pattern, Accent Rate and Shuffle Rate parameters to add variations to the style as desired. • When you make the settings in Patch/Rhythm Set/GM mode, Motif, Beat Pattern, Accent Rate and Shuffle Rate parameter settings will be lost if you select another style and then turn the power off. However, in Performance mode, you can save them to each Performance as the Performance parameters. • The values you can set with the Motif or Beat Pattern parameters are normally limited by the selected style. Only when the Style parameter is set to LIMITLESS will all values be acceptable. 1. Access the ARPEGGIO page. In Patch/Rhythm Set/GM Mode Press [SYSTEM], getting the indicator to light, and then press the [ARPEGGIO] function button. In Performance Mode Press [ZONE], getting the indicator to light, and then press the [ARPEGGIO]. fig.04-11 * Here is what appears in the first page of the ARPEGGIO page. For details regarding each parameter, refer to “Arpeggiator Settings (ARPEGGIO)” (p. 61, p. 174). 2. Move the cursor to “Style” and specify the style you want. 3. Move the cursor to “Octave Range” and specify the key range over which you want arpeggio.

4. Press , move the cursor to “Motif,” and specify the order in which the notes of the chord will be sounded. The available choices depend on the Style parameter setting. For details, refer to “Arpeggio Style List” (p. 268). 5. Move the cursor to “Beat Pattern,” then change the rhythm. The available choices depend on the Style parameter setting. For details, refer to “Arpeggio Style List” (p. 268). 6. Press , move the cursor to “Accent Rate,” and specify the groove ratio. A setting of 100% will produce the most pronounced groove feel. 7. Move the cursor to “Shuffle Rate” and specify the swing rate. With a setting of 50%, the notes will be spaced evenly. As the value increases, the note timing will have more of a “swing” feel. 8. Press , move the cursor to “Key Velocity,” and specify the strength with which the notes of the chord will be sounded. When REAL is selected, the velocity at which the notes are actually played will be used. With a setting of 1–127, the specified velocity value will be used regardless of the force with which you play the chord. 9. When playing in Layer Performance, move the cursor to “Zone” and specify the Zone linked to the part playing arpeggios. Arpeggios will be played only in the Zone and linked Part specified here. Chords will sound exactly as played in other Zones. 10.Move the cursor to “Tempo” and specify the speed of an arpeggio. 11.After you finish making settings, press [EXIT]. Moving Your Hand Above the D Beam Controller to Apply Effects (D Beam Controller) The D Beam Controller is an easy-to-use controller you can operate just by moving your hand over it. By changing the function assigned to the controller, you can add a variety of different effects to the sound. The controller lets you add effects such as instantaneous changes in tone that are impossible to do with knobs and sliders. The D Beam Controller is provided under license from Interactive Light, Inc. When selecting a Single Performance, the effect is applied to the single specified Part (current Part). When a Layer Performance is selected, the effect is applied to all Zones with Local switches set to ON and their linked Parts. Tone changes made with the D Beam controller can also be sent to an external MIDI device (p. 59). 1. Make sure that the PLAY page of the sound generator mode (PERFORM, PATCH, RHYTHM, or GM) is displayed. 2. Press D BEAM CONTROLLER [ON] to turn on the D Beam Controller. 3. When changing the function to be controlled with the D Beam Controller, hold down [ON] to display the D BEAM CONTROL page, move the cursor to “Assign,” then make the setting. fig.04-16This setting is linked with the Assign parameter. In Patch/Rhythm Set/GM Mode Assign parameter (SYSTEM/D BEAM/D BEAM CONTROL) (p. 176) In Performance Mode Chapter 2 Chapter 2 Chapter 2

Assign parameter (ZONE/D BEAM/D BEAM CONTROL) (p. 63) For more detailed information on the functions that can be controlled, refer to (p. 63, p. 176). Chapter 2. Playing 45 46Chapter 2. Playing 4. When changing the sound generator to be controlled with the D Beam Controller, hold down [ON] to display the D BEAM CONTROL page, move the cursor to “Output,” then make the setting. fig.02-20Set the output to INT when controlling only the internal sound generator, to MIDI when controlling an external sound generator, or BOTH when you want to control both internal and external sound generators. When controlling neither the internal nor any external sound generator, set this to OFF. This setting is linked with the Output parameter. In Patch/Rhythm Set/GM Mode Output parameter (SYSTEM/D BEAM/D BEAM CONTROL) (p. 176) In Performance Mode Output parameter (ZONE/D BEAM/D BEAM CONTROL) (p. 63) 5. When changing the D Beam Controller’s polarity, hold down [ON] to display the D BEAM CONTROL page, move the cursor to “Polarity,” then make the setting. fig.02-21With a setting of REVERSE, the direction of control for the D Beam controller will be inverted. This setting is linked with the Polarity parameter. In Patch/Rhythm Set/GM Mode Polarity parameter (SYSTEM/D BEAM/D BEAM CONTROL) (p. 177) In Performance Mode Polarity parameter (ZONE/D BEAM/D BEAM CONTROL) (p. 63) 6. When changing the range to be controlled by the D Beam Controller, hold down [ON] and press to display the D BEAM RANGE page, move the cursor to “Lower” or “Upper,” then make the setting. fig.04-17Set the lower limit for the range with the Lower parameter, and the upper limit for the range with the Upper parameter. It is not possible to set the lower limit value above the upper limit, nor can you set the upper limit value below the lower limit. This setting is linked with the Lower, Upper parameter. In Patch/Rhythm Set/GM Mode Lower, Upper parameter (SYSTEM/D BEAM/D BEAM RANGE) (p. 177) In Performance Mode Lower, Upper parameter (ZONE/D BEAM/D BEAM RANGE) (p. 64) 7. When changing the sensitivity of the D Beam Controller, hold down [ON] and press to display the D BEAM SENS page, then make the setting. fig.04-18The higher the value set, the more readily the D Beam Controller goes into effect. Ordinarily, this is set to 5. This setting is linked with the D Beam Sensitivity parameter. In Patch/Rhythm Set/GM Mode D Beam Sensitivity parameter (SYSTEM/D BEAM/D BEAM SENS) (p. 177) In Performance Mode D Beam Sensitivity parameter (ZONE/D BEAM/D BEAM SENS) (p. 64) 8. You operate the D Beam Controller by moving your hand over it, as you produce sounds by playing the keyboard. 9. To turn off the D Beam Controller, press D BEAM CONTROLLER [ON] once again, extinguishing the indicator. By holding down [SHIFT] and pressing D BEAM CONTROLLER [ON], you can display each of the settings pages without having to hold down [ON]. To return to the original window, press [EXIT].

The effective range of the D Beam Controller The effective range of the D Beam Controller is as shown in the following diagram. Hand movement outside of this area will have no effect. fig.02-22The effective range of the D Beam controller will decrease in locations of strong direct sunlight. Be aware of this when using the D Beam controller outdoors. Chapter 2. Playing Convenient Functions for Performance Transposing the Keyboard in Octave Units (Octave Shift) The Octave Shift function transposes the pitch of the keyboard in 1 octave units (-3– +3 octaves). For playing a bass part more easily using your right hand, transpose the keyboard down by 1 or 2 octaves. 1. Press [+OCT] or [-OCT] and its indicator will light. Pressing [+OCT] once will raise the keyboard 1 octave. Pressing [-OCT] once will lower the keyboard 1 octave. The specified Octave Shift setting will be shown in the “kbd=C 4” indication of each PLAY page. For example if you press [+OCT] once to raise the keyboard one octave, the display will indicate “kbd=C 5.” This means that when you press the C4 key, the C5 note will sound. fig.02-23There is only one Octave Shift setting in the XV-88, so it remain valid even if you select a different Patch, Performance or Rhythm Set or turn power off.

2. To turn off the Octave Shift function, press the other button [+OCT] or [-OCT] of that pressed in step 1. The indicator will go off. 47 48Chapter 2. Playing Transposing the Keyboard in Semitone Steps (Transpose) Transpose changes keyboard pitch in units of semitones (-5– +6 semitones). This function is useful when you play transposed instruments such as trumpet or clarinet following a printed score. 1. Press [TRANSPOSE] to light indicator. This turns Transpose on. 2. While holding down [TRANSPOSE], press [+OCT] or [- OCT] to transpose the keyboard. Pressing [+OCT] once while holding down [TRANSPOSE] will raise the keyboard one semitone. Pressing [-OCT] once while holding down [TRANSPOSE] will lower the keyboard one semitone. The specified Transpose setting will be added to the Octave Shift value. For example, if you hold down [TRANSPOSE] and press [+OCT] once to raise the keyboard a semitone, the display will indicate “kbd=C#4.” So when C4 is pressed, the C#4 note will sound. 3. To turn off Transpose, press [TRANSPOSE] once again so that its indicator goes off. The Transpose setting you make will be maintained. The Transpose setting you make here will also change the Transpose parameter (SYSTEM/CONTROL/ KEYBOARD). The setting you make will be maintained even if you select a different Patch, Performance or Rhythm Set, or turn the power off. If “Stuck” Notes Occur (Panic) If some operation causes sounds from the XV-88, or sounds from an external sound generator connected with a MIDI cable to fail to stop playing, use the Panic function. When Sounds from the XV-88 Do Not Stop Playing 1. Hold down [SHIFT] and press [EXIT]. Sounds from the XV-88 stop playing. 2. The display will indicate “Panic! Now Muting.” while the Panic function is being executed. When this message goes off, you can start playing. What to Do When an External Sound Generator Fails to Stop Sounding 1. Hold down [SHIFT] and press [EXIT] for more than a second. MIDI messages for All Sounds Off, Reset All Controllers, Hold 1 (0), Hold 2 (0), and Sostenuto (0) will be transmitted to all MIDI channels (Parts). 2. The display will indicate “Panic! Now Transmitting.” while the Panic function is being executed. When this message goes away, you can start playing. Chapter 3. Creating Performances

With the XV-88, you have total control over a wide variety of settings. Each item that can be set is known as a parameter. When you change the values of parameters, you are doing what is referred to as Editing. This chapter explains the procedures used in creating Performances, and the functions of the Performance parameters. How a Performance Is Organized A Performance is a collective set of assignments of the sixteen different Patches and Rhythm Sets. Since a Performance can simultaneously handle 16 different sounds, it allows you to play multiple Patches simultaneously (layer) or to play different Patches in different areas of the keyboard (split), and to create ensembles. fig.01-06.e How to Make the Performance Settings Start with an existing Performance and edit it to create a new Performance. But before you do, try to envision what the entire Performance will sound like and decide which Patch or Rhythm Set to assign to each of 16 Parts. 1. Press [PERFORM] to access the PERFORM PLAY page, and select the Performance whose settings you wish to modify (p. 35). If you want to create all your Performances from the ground up, rather than the Performances that have already been prepared, carry out the Initialize operation (p. 185). 2. Press [EDIT] to make the indicator light. 3. Use the function buttons to select a display group. The indicator for the button of the selected display group begins blinking. fig.03-01 4. Use or to select a display page. 5. If you have selected a parameter display that can be set independently for each Part, the number of the Part selected for editing will be shown in the upper left of the display. To edit a different Part, press [EDIT] to temporarily turn off the indicator, and use ZONE/PART SELECT [1/9]–[8/16] to select a Part. When the [1-8/9- 16] indicator is extinguished, Parts 1–8 are selected, and when the [1-8/9-16] indicator is lit, Parts 9–16 are Performance selected. [EDIT] to make the indicator light, and use the function buttons. You can also move to another display group by holding down [SHIFT] and using or . Since this can be done even when the [EDIT] indicator is dark, it is a faster way to get around because you don’t have to turn on the [EDIT] indicator each time. 9. Repeat steps 3–8 to complete a Performance.

fig.03-02 Part 16 6. Use or to move the cursor to the parameter you wish to modify. 7. Use the VALUE dial, [INC/+]/[DEC/-], or the numeric keys to modify the parameter value. Part 1

Patch/ Rhythm Set If you’ve made a mistake in setting a parameter value, or you have second thoughts about the changes, press [UNDO/COMPARE] to restore the value to what it was. 8. If you wish to move to another display group, press 49

50Chapter 3. Creating Performances 10.When you finish making settings, press [EXIT] or [PERFORM] to return to the PERFORM PLAY page. An asterisk * appears at the left of the Performance group on the display. This shows Performance settings have been modified. fig.03-03If you select another Performance in the group with an asterisk *, the modified Performance settings will be lost. To keep these modified settings, perform the save operation (p. 164). Making Settings While Comparing Parts (Palette Edit) When modifying Part settings for a Performance, the values for eight Parts (Part 1–8 or Part 9–16) will be displayed together on a single display. This is called the Palette page. This is useful when you wish to change parameter values while comparing each Part settings. 1. When modifying a Part, use or to move the cursor to the parameter you wish to modify. 2. Press [PALETTE EDIT] to call up the Palette page. fig.03-04 3. Press or to choose the Part to modify. The Part number and the Patch or Rhythm Set name assigned to the Part will appear. To switch between the palette page for Parts 1–8 and the palette page for Parts 9–16, press [1-8/9-16]. 4. Use the VALUE dial, [INC/+]/[DEC/-], or the numeric keys to change the parameter value. If you’ve made a mistake in setting a parameter value, or you have second thoughts about the changes, press [UNDO/COMPARE] to restore the value to what it was. 5. If you wish to edit other parameters, press or to select the parameter that you wish to edit. 6. Repeat steps 3–5 to complete a Performance. 7. To exit the Palette page, press [PALETTE EDIT], thus extinguishing the button’s indicator. Copying the Settings of Another Part (Part Copy) Part settings from any desired Performance can be copied to any desired Part of the currently selected Performance. This function can help you save time. 1. Make sure a Performance is selected. 2. Press [UTILITY], getting its indicator to start blinking. 3. Press the numeric key [2], then or to call up the PERFORM PART CPY page. fig.10-09.e 4. Press the cursor buttons to move the cursor to the parameter you wish to set. 5. Either rotate the VALUE dial or press [INC/+]/[DEC/-] to set the value. • To specify the currently selected Performance as the copy source, set Source to TEMP. • When the cursor is located at Source, you can also use [USER], [PRESET], [A], and [B] to select a Performance group, and then use numeric keys to specify the Performance number. • When the cursor is located at Part, you can also use [1-8/ 9-16] and ZONE/PART SELECT [1/9]–[8/16] to select the Part. 6. Press [ENTER] to execute the Copy operation. When the Copy operation is executed, an * symbol will be displayed in front of the copy-destination Part. 7. Press [UTILITY] to return to the previous page. Copy Copy source Performance (group, number) source Performance name Copy source Part Copy destination Part

Chapter 3. Creating Performances Functions of Performance Parameters This section explains the functions the different Performance parameters have, as well as the composition of these parameters. fig.03-01 Settings Common to the Entire Performance (COMMON) Common settings include those used for naming Performances, Key Range, and so on. PERFORM NAME (Performance Name) fig.03-05 You can assign a name to the Performance of up to 12 characters. For details on assigning names, refer to “Assigning a Name” (p. 28). KEY RANG (Key Range) fig.03-06 Set the keyboard range in which each Part will sound. Use this when you wish to play different Patches in different areas of the keyboard. Lower (Key Range Lower) Upper (Key Range Upper) Specify the lower (Lower) and upper (Upper) limits in which each Part will sound. When the Key Range (p. 73) is set for each individual Tone in a Patch, sounds are produced in the range where the Key Range of each Tone and the Key Range for the Part overlap. fig.02-10.eIf you attempt to raise the lower key higher than the upper key, or to lower the upper key below the lower key, the other value will be automatically modified to the same setting. L.Fade (Key Fade Width Lower) U.Fade (Key Fade Width Upper) L.Fade and U.Fade set the range within which the volume gradually fades as the velocity approaches the limits of the Key Range set in the Lower and Upper parameters. Use this setting when, for example, you want to have adjacent Parts in Split mode switched smoothly. The higher the values set, the smoother the switch is between the Tones. When you want the Tones to be switched instantly, set these to 0. fig.03-07.e PERFORM MFX CH (Performance MFX Channel) fig.03-08 MFX Control Channel (Multi-effects Control Channel) This determines the channel that will be used for reception when using the Multi-effects Controller to modify multi- effects parameters in real time, when the multi-effects Source parameter (PERFORM/EFFECTS/MFX TYPE) (p. 114) is set to PERFORM. For details on the Multi-effects Controller, refer to (p. 115). Key range specified for Performance Key range specified for Patch The range in which notes will play Level Pitch L.Fade Lower Upper U.Fade 51

52Chapter 3. Creating Performances Setting Effects for a Performance (EFFECTS) For details regarding effect settings, refer to the pages shown below. • “Applying Effects in Performance Mode” (p. 111) • “Making Multi-Effects Settings” (p. 114) • “Making Chorus Settings” (p. 156) • “Making Reverb Settings” (p. 158) Making Settings for Receiving MIDI (MIDI) These parameters determine how each Part will transmit and receive MIDI messages. MIDI fig.03-09 Channel (MIDI Receive Channel) Sets the MIDI receive channel for each Part. If this is set to the same channel as the Control Channel parameter (SYSTEM/MIDI/PERFORM MIDI), attempting to use MIDI messages (Program Change and Bank Select) from an external device to select Patches will select Performances instead. If you want to select Patches, change the Control Channel parameter to a different setting (p. 169). Rx Sw (Receive Switch) Specifies whether each Part will receive MIDI messages (ON), or not (OFF) from external MIDI devices. When set to OFF, the Part will respond to the keyboard, but not to the external MIDI devices. Normally, you should leave this ON, but you can turn it OFF when you do not want a specific Part to be playing during song playback. You can also set the Rx Sw parameter on the PERFORM PLAY page. Hold down [SHIFT] and press ZONE/ PART SELECT [1/9]–[8/16]; Rx Sw is on when the indicator is lit, and off when the indicator is extinguished. When the [1-8/9-16] indicator is extinguished, Parts 1–8 are switched on and off, and when the [1-8/9-16] indicator is lit, Parts 9–16 are switched on and off (p. 38). Mute Sw (Mute Switch) Mute Sw temporarily mutes (MUTE) or releases the mute (OFF) for the performance of each Part. Use this setting when, for example, you want to use the instrument for karaoke by muting the Part playing the melody, or when you want to play something using a separate sound module. The Mute Sw parameter does not turn the Part off, but rather mutes the sound by setting the volume to 0. Therefore, MIDI messages are still received. RxSWITCH (Receive Switch) fig.03-10 fig.03-11 RxSWITCH determines whether MIDI messages for the following parameters in each MIDI channel are received (ON), or not received (OFF). Bank Select (Receive Bank Select Switch) Program Change (Receive Program Change Switch) Vol (Receive Volume Switch) Pan (Receive Pan Switch) Exp (Receive Expression Switch) Hld (Receive Hold 1 Switch) Bnd (Receive Pitch Bend Switch) Mod (Receive Modulation Switch) Caf (Receive Channel Aftertouch Switch) Paf (Receive Polyphonic Aftertouch Switch) Chapter 3. Creating Performances VELO CRV (Velocity Curve) fig.03-12 XP-A–D: Wave Expansion Board A–D Velocity Curve Velocity Curve selects for each MIDI channel one of the four following Velocity Curve types that best matches the touch of the connected MIDI keyboard. Set this to OFF if you are using the MIDI keyboard’s own velocity curve. fig.03-13 Phase Lock (Phase Lock Switch) Set Phase Lock to ON when you want to suppress discrepancies in timing of Parts played on the same MIDI channel, or to OFF when you want to leave the expression timing unchanged. When the Phase Lock parameter is set to ON, Parts on the same MIDI channel are put in a condition in which their timing is matched, enabling them to be played at the same time. Accordingly, a certain amount of time may elapse between reception of the Note messages and playing of the sounds. Turn this setting to ON only as needed. Making Settings for Each Part (PART) Here you can select the Patch/Rhythm Set assigned to each Part, and set the volume, pan, pitch, and polyphony of each Part. PATCH fig.03-14 Type (Part Type) Sets the assignment of a Patch (PAT) or Rhythm Set (RHY) to each of the Parts. Group (Patch/Rhythm Set Group) Selects the group to which the desired Patch or Rhythm Set belongs. USER: User CD-A–H: Memory card A–H PR-A–F, GM: Preset A–F, GM • Patches/Rhythm Sets of CD-A–H cannot be accessed unless a memory card (SmartMedia) is inserted into the MEMORY CARD slot. • XP-A, B Patches/Rhythm Sets can be selected only if a Wave Expansion Board (SR-JV80 Series) is installed in the corresponding slot. • XP-C, D Patches/Rhythm Sets can be selected only if a Wave Expansion Board (SRX Series) is installed in the corresponding slot. Number (Patch/Rhythm Set Number) Selects the desired Patch or Rhythm Set by its number. The name of the selected Patch/Rhythm Set appears in parentheses. SETTING fig.03-15 Level (Part Level) Adjusts the volume of an individual Part. This setting’s main purpose is to adjust the volume balance between Parts. Pan (Part Pan) Adjusts the pan of each Part. L64 is far left, 0 is center, and 63R is far right. When the Pan is set for each Patch or Rhythm Set, this Pan setting moves the position only in reference to those settings values made in the respective Patch or Rhythm Set. Voice Reserve This setting specifies the number of voices that will be reserved for each Part when more than 128 voices are played simultaneously. It is not possible for the settings of all Parts to total an amount greater than 64. The remaining number of available voices will be displayed at (rest= ). Pay attention to this readout as you make set the Voice Reserve parameter. 2 1 3 4 53

54Chapter 3. Creating Performances MODIFY fig.03-16 Cut (Part Cutoff Frequency Offset) Adjusts the cutoff frequency for the Patch or Rhythm Set assigned to a Part. Patches also have a Cutoff Frequency Offset setting (p. 71). The final Cutoff frequency value is the sum of the Tone Cutoff Frequency value and the Patch and Part Cutoff Frequency Offset values. If the Tone’s cutoff frequency is already set to 127 (maximum), there will be no change produced by setting the Cutoff Frequency Offset to a positive value. Res (Part Resonance Offset) Adjusts the Resonance for the Patch or Rhythm Set assigned to a Part. Patches also have a Resonance Offset setting (p. 71). The final Resonance value is the sum of the Tone Resonance value and the Patch and Part Resonance Offset values. If the Tone’s resonance is already set to 127 (maximum), there will be no change produced by setting the resonance offset to a positive value. Atk (Part Attack Time Offset) Adjusts the TVA Envelope Attack Time for the Patch or Rhythm Set assigned to a Part. Calculating the Number of Voices Being Used The XV-88 is able to play up to 128 notes simultaneously. The polyphony, or the number of voices (sounds) does not refer only to the number of sounds actually being played, but changes according to the number of tones used in the Patches, and the number of Waves used in the tones. The following method is used to calculate the number of sounds used for one Patch being played. (Number of Sounds Being Played) x (Number of Tones Used by Patches Being Played) x (Number of Waves Used in the Tones) Patches also contain the Attack Time Offset setting (p. 71). The final TVA Envelope attack time value is therefore the sum of the Tone’s TVA Envelope T1 setting, the Patch’s Attack Time Offset, and the Part’s Attack Time Offset. If the Tone’s T1 parameter is already set to 127 (maximum), there will be no change produced by setting the Attack Time Offset to a positive value. Rel (Part Release Time Offset) Adjusts the TVA Envelope Release Time for the Patch or Rhythm Set assigned to a Part. Patches also contain a Release Time Offset setting (p. 72). The final TVA Envelope release time value is therefore the sum of the Tone’s TVA Envelope T4 setting, the Patch’s Release Time Offset, and the Part’s Release Time Offset. If the tone’s T4 parameter is set to 127 (maximum), there will be no change in the Release Time Offset, even when this is set to a positive value. Velocity Sens (Part velocity Sensitivity Offset) This changes the volume and cutoff frequency for each part according to the velocity with which the keys are pressed. If you want strongly played notes to raise the volume/cutoff frequency, set this parameter to positive (+) settings. If you want strongly played notes to lower the volume/cutoff frequency, use negative (-) settings. Set Velocity Sensitivity to 0 when you want sounds played at a fixed volume and cutoff frequency, regardless of the force with which the keys are played. Patches also contain a Velocity Sensitivity Offset setting (p. 72). The ultimate Velocity Sensitivity Offset value is the sum of the part’s and the Patch’s Velocity Sensitivity Offsets. Accordingly, if the Patch’s Velocity Sensitivity Offset T1 parameter is set to 127 (maximum), there will be no change in the part’s Velocity Sensitivity Offset, even when this is set to a positive value. PITCH fig.03-17 Octave (Part Octave Shift) Adjusts the pitch of the Part’s sound up or down in units of an octave (+/-3 octaves).

Chapter 3. Creating Performances Coarse (Part Coarse Tune) Adjusts the pitch of the Part’s sound up or down in semitone steps (+/-4 octaves). Fine (Part Fine Tune) Adjusts the pitch of the Part’s sound up or down in 1-cent steps (+/-50 cents). One cent is 1/100th of a semitone. BendRng (Bend Range) Specifies the amount of pitch change in semitones (2 octaves) that will occur when the Pitch Bend Lever is moved. The amount of change when the lever is tilted is set to the same value for both left and right sides. When using the setting of the Patch assigned to each Part (p. 78), set this to PATCH. MONO/POL (Mono/Poly) fig.03-18 Mno/Pol (Part Mono/Poly) Set Mno/Pol to MONO when the Patch assigned to the Part is to be played monophonically, or to POLY when the Patch is to be played polyphonically. When using the setting of the Patch assigned to each Part (p. 76), set this to PATCH. Coarse Tune and Octave Shift For the Part to which the Rhythm Set is assigned, this The Coarse and Fine parameters, along with the Octave setting is ignored. parameter, can all be seen as doing the same thing to the sound, i.e., changing the pitch of the sound. For example, Legato (Part Legato Switch) if C4 (Middle C) is played with the Coarse parameter set You can add legato when performing monophonically. to +12, the note produced is C5 (one octave above C4). Legato is a playing style in which the spaces between notes However, if C4 (Middle C) is played with the Octave are smoothed, creating a flowing feel with no borders parameter set to +1, again, the note produced is C5 (one between the notes. This allows you to simulate the octave above C4). hammering-on and pulling-off playing techniques of a However, internally these function very differently. guitarist. When the Coarse parameter is set to +12, the pitch itself Turn this parameter ON when you want to use the Legato is raised one octave. On the other hand, when the Octave feature and OFF when you don’t. When using the setting of parameter is set to +1, it is the same as pressing the keys the Patch assigned to each Part (p. 76), set this to PATCH. one octave up. In other words, use the Coarse parameter when changing the pitch, and the Octave parameter when you want to shift the entire keyboard, for example, For the Part to which the Rhythm Set is assigned, this when the number of keys is insufficient. setting is ignored. Portament Sw:Tm Note that when a Rhythm Set is assigned to a Part, if (Part Portamento Switch:Time) the Octave parameter is set, the Rhythm Tone that is Portamento makes a smooth pitch transition from one note to played also changes. the next note played. Also, when playing monophonically, you can apply portamento to simulate the slide performance technique sometimes used on instruments such as violin. You can determine whether the Portamento effect will be applied or not using Portamento switch (Sw). Turn this parameter ON when you want to apply Portamento and OFF when you don’t. When using the setting of the Patch assigned to each Part (p. 76), set this to PATCH. The Portamento Time (Tm) setting adjusts the time over which the pitch will change. Higher settings will cause the pitch change to the next note to take more time. When using the setting of the Patch assigned to each Part (p. 76), set this to PATCH. For the Part to which the Rhythm Set is assigned, this setting is ignored. 55

56Chapter 3. Creating Performances Confirming MIDI Information for Each Part (INFO) INFO (Part Information) fig.03-19 fig.03-20 The displays allow you to check various settings such as MIDI message reception status for each Part. This is convenient when you need to check that the sound generator is responding correctly to messages from the keyboard or external MIDI controller. Mod (Modulation Information) Breath (Breath Information) Foot (Foot Information) Vol (Volume Information) Pan (Pan Information) Exp (Expression Information) Hld (Hold 1 Information) Bnd (Pitch Bend Information) Aft (Aftertouch Information) Sy1–4 (System Control 1–4 Information) The MIDI message specified as the Control 1–4 parameter (SYSTEM/CONTROL/SYS CTRL ASSIGN 1, 2) Vo (Voice Information) The number of voices used When a value (except Vo) is changed in the INFO page, a MIDI message for the changed value is sent to the internal sound generator and the external MIDI device over the MIDI channel set for that Part. Changing the Settings of the Patch/Rhythm Set Assigned to a Part When using Patches in Performance mode, some settings such as effects settings will be affected by Performance settings. If you wish to edit a Patch/Rhythm Set while hearing how it will sound in the Performance, use this procedure: * Here we explain how to change the setting of a Patch assigned to a Part. The procedure for changing the settings of Rhythm Sets is the same. Substitute “Rhythm Set” wherever “Patch” appears in a sentence. 1. Make sure the PERFORM PLAY page is displayed. 2. While holding down [PERFORM], press [PATCH]. Both button indicators will light. This will call up the PLAY page of the Patch assigned to the currently selected Part. fig.03-21 3. Press or to select the Part to which the selected Patch is assigned. 4. The following steps are the same as when you modify a Patch in Patch mode. 5. When you finish making settings, press [EXIT] to call up the Play page of the Patch assigned to the Part. An asterisk * will be displayed at the left of the Patch group. This indicates the Patch settings have been modified. If you select another Patch or Performance in the group with an asterisk *, the modified Patch settings will be lost. To keep these modified settings, perform the save operation (p. 164). 6. To return to the PERFORM PLAY page, press [PERFORM] or [EXIT].

Chapter 4. Zone Settings

Pressing [ZONE] while in Performance mode switches you to Zone mode. In Zone mode, you can make settings affecting the way the sound module plays sounds in response to Performances played on the keyboard, the way MIDI messages are sent, the Arpeggiator and D Beam functions, and more. You cannot switch to Zone mode from any mode other than Performance mode. This section explains the procedures for making Zone settings and describes the functions of the different Zone parameters. How to Make the Zone Settings 1. Press [PERFORM] to display the PERFORM PLAY page, and select the Performance with Zone settings you want to change (p. 35). 2. Press [ZONE] to make the indicator light. The [EDIT] indicator lights simultaneously, and the XV- 88 is put into Zone mode. If the [EDIT] indicator is not lit, press [EDIT] to get the indicator to light. 3. Use the function buttons to select a display group. The indicator for the button of the selected display group begins blinking. fig.04-01 4. Use or to select a display page. 5. If you have selected a parameter display that can be set independently for each Zone, the number of the Zone selected for editing will be shown in the upper left of the display. To edit a different Zone, press [EDIT] to temporarily turn off the indicator, and use ZONE/PART SELECT [1/9]–[8/16] to select a Zone. When the [1-8/9- 16] indicator is extinguished, Zones 1–8 are selected, and when the [1-8/9-16] indicator is lit, Zones 9–16 are selected. fig.04-02 6. Use or to move the cursor to the parameter you wish to modify. 7. Use the VALUE dial, [INC/+]/[DEC/-], or the numeric keys to modify the parameter value. If you’ve made a mistake in setting a parameter value, press [UNDO/COMPARE] to restore the value to what it was. 8. If you wish to move to another display group, press [EDIT] to make the indicator light, and use the function buttons. You can also move to another display group by holding down [SHIFT] and using or . Since this can be done even when the [EDIT] indicator is dark, it is a faster way to get around because you don’t have to turn on the [EDIT] indicator each time. 9. Repeat steps 3–8 to make settings for the Zone. 10.When you finish making settings, press [EXIT] or [PERFORM] to return to the PERFORM PLAY page. An asterisk * appears at the left of the Performance group on the display. This shows Performance settings have been modified. fig.03-03Zone settings can be saved individually for each Performance, as part of the Performance settings. If you select another Performance in the group with an asterisk *, the modified Zone settings will be lost. To keep these modified settings, perform the save operation (p. 164). 57

58Chapter 4. Zone Settings Making Settings While Comparing Zones (Palette Edit) When modifying Zone settings for a Performance, the values for eight Zones (Zone 1–8 or Zone 9–16) will be displayed together on a single display. This is called the Palette page. This is useful when you wish to change parameter values while comparing each Zone settings. 1. When editing parameters that can be set individually in each Zone, press or to move the cursor to the parameter to be edited. 2. Press [PALETTE EDIT] to call up the Palette page. fig.04-03 3. Press or to choose the Zone to modify. When the Zone number is displayed, and that Zone’s Local Switch is set to ON, you can check which Parts are linked. Parts 1–16 are shown in order from left to right, and Parts for which the Zone’s MIDI transmit channel and the Part’s MIDI receive channel are matched are indicated by a o for the Part. To switch between the palette page for Zones 1–8 and the palette page for Zones 9–16, press [1-8/9-16]. 4. Use the VALUE dial, [INC/+]/[DEC/-], or the numeric keys to change the parameter value. If you’ve made a mistake in setting the parameter value, press [UNDO/COMPARE] to restore the value to what it was. 5. If you wish to edit other parameters, press or to select the parameter that you wish to edit. 6. Repeat steps 3–5 to make the settings for the Zone. 7. To exit the Palette page, press [PALETTE EDIT], thus extinguishing the button’s indicator. Functions of Zone Parameters This section explains the functions the different Zone parameters have, as well as the composition of these parameters. fig.04-01 Settings Common to the Entire Zone (COMMON) ZONE COMMON fig.04-04 Key Mode The Key Mode determines how the XV-88 will sound when its keyboard is played. LAYER: When the keys are pressed, all Zones whose Local switches (Local parameter) are set to ON and the sounds for the linked (where the MIDI channels coincide) Parts are played. Transmission of MIDI messages from the keyboard controller section to external MIDI devices will be determined by the Transmit switch (Tx parameter) setting of each Zone. fig.04-05.e Part 1 (Rx ch.1) Local Switch Transmit Switch Zone 1 (Tx ch.1) Zone 2 (Tx ch.2) Part 2 (Rx ch.2) MIDI OUT Zone 15 (Tx ch.15) Zone 16 (Tx ch.16) Part 15 (Rx ch.15) Part 16 (Rx ch.16)

Chapter 4. Zone Settings SINGLE: When the keys are pressed, the single specified Part (current Part) are played. Zone settings are ignored. Transmission of MIDI messages from the keyboard controller section to external MIDI devices will be determined by the Receive switch (Rx Sw parameter) setting for the current Part fig.04-06.eIf you have selected a LAYER-type Performance, the upper right of the PERFORM PLAY page will indicate “LAYER p *” (* is the Part number). If you have selected a SINGLE-type Performance, “part= *” (* is the Part number) will be displayed. You can also set the Key Mode parameter on the PERFORM PLAY page. By holding down [SHIFT] and pressing [SOLO], you can switch between SINGLE and LAYER. Setting the Keyboard Range (KEY RANGE) When a Single Performance is selected, this setting is disabled. KEY RANG (Key Range) fig.04-07 These parameters set the key range that will be transmitted from the keyboard for each Zone. Use this when you wish to play different Patches in different areas of the keyboard. Lower (Key Range Lower) Specify the lower limit of the range. Upper (Key Range Upper) Specify the upper limit of the range. When the Key Range (p. 73) is set for each individual Tone in a Patch, sounds are produced in the range where the Key Range of each Tone and the Key Range for the Zone overlap. Part 1 Part 2 fig.02-10.e(Rx ch.1) (Rx ch.2) If you attempt to raise the lower key higher than the upper key, or to lower the upper key below the lower key, the other value will be automatically modified to the same setting. Making Settings for Transmitting MIDI (MIDI) These parameters determine how each Zone will transmit MIDI messages. When a Single Performance is selected, this setting is disabled. MIDI fig.04-08 Channel (MIDI Transmit Channel) Specifies the MIDI transmit channel for each Zone. Tx (Transmit Switch) Determines, for each Zone, whether or not data generated by the keyboard controller section is sent as MIDI messages from the MIDI OUT connector. Normally you will leave this ON, but you can turn it OFF when you do not want the XV-88 to control external sound generators. Part 15 Part 16 (Rx ch.15) (Rx ch.16) MIDI OUT (Tx ch.1) Key range specified for Performance Key range specified for Patch The range in which notes will play 59

60Chapter 4. Zone Settings You can also set the transmit switch settings on the PERFORM PLAY page. When the [EDIT] indicator is extinguished and the [LOCAL/TX] indicator is lit, press ZONE/PART SELECT [1/9]–[8/16] to make settings. A Layer Performance is on when the indicator is lit, and off when the indicator is extinguished. When the [1-8/9-16] indicator is extinguished, Zones 1–8 are switched on and off, and when the [1-8/9-16] indicator is lit, Zones 9–16 are switched on and off. Local (Local Switch) Specifies, for each Zone, whether or not the keyboard controller section will be connected to the internal sound generator. Normally you will leave this ON, but you can turn it OFF when you want to use the XV-88 only to control an external sound generator. You can also set the Local switch setting on the PERFORM PLAY page. When the [EDIT] indicator and the [LOCAL/TX] indicator is extinguished, press ZONE/PART SELECT [1/9]–[8/16] to make settings. A Layer Performance is on when the indicator is lit, and off when the indicator is extinguished. When the [1-8/9-16] indicator is extinguished, Zones 1–8 are switched on and off, and when the [1-8/9-16] indicator is lit, Zones 9–16 are switched on and off. Controlling External Sound Module (EXT CONTROL) When a Single Performance is selected, this setting is disabled. EXT P.C (External Program Change) fig.04-09 When switching Performances, send MIDI messages (Program Change/Bank Select) to each Zone to switch the Tones corresponding to the external sound module. After setting each value, you can transmit it by pressing [ENTER]. The data of the Zone for which the Transmit switch is turned off will not be transmitted. P.C# (External Program Change Number) Selects the Program Change number you wish to transmit. If you do not want this message to be transmitted, set this to NO-SEND. Bank Select MSB/LSB (External Bank Select MSB/LSB) Selects the Bank Select number MSB (Controller number 0) and LSB (Controller number 32) you want to transmit. Information on the XV-88 Tone Group/Bank corresponding to the Bank Select message sent is displayed in parentheses. EXT CTRL (External Control) fig.04-10 Volume (External Volume) If you want Volume messages to also be transmitted when you select a Performance, specify the desired value (0–127) for the Zone. Turn this parameter NO-SEND if you do not want this data to be transmitted. The data of the Zone for which the Transmit switch is turned off will not be transmitted. Pan (External Pan) If you want Pan messages to also be transmitted when you select a Performance, specify the desired value (0–127) for the Zone. Turn this parameter NO-SEND if you do not want this data to be transmitted. The data of the Zone for which the Transmit switch is turned off will not be transmitted. Chapter 4. Zone Settings Arpeggiator Settings (ARPEGGIO) HARP: A style simulating harp playing. This is where the settings used in performing arpeggios in Performance mode are made. When arpeggios are performed in Patch/Rhythm Set/ GM mode, the arpeggio settings are made in System mode (p. 174). ARPEGGIO fig.04-11 fig.04-12 fig.04-13 fig.04-14 Style (Arpeggio Style) Specifies the basic way in which the arpeggio will be played. Select one of the following 45 types. 1/4: The rhythm will be divided in quarter notes. 1/6: The rhythm will be divided in quarter note triplets. 1/8: The rhythm will be divided in eighth notes. 1/12: The rhythm will be divided in eighth note triplets. 1/16: The rhythm will be divided in 16th notes. 1/32: The rhythm will be divided in 32nd notes. PORTAMENTO A, B: A style using the portamento effect. GLISSANDO: A glissando style. SEQUENCE A–D: Styles for sequenced patterns. ECHO: An echo-like style. SYNTH BASS, HEAVY SLAP, LIGHT SLAP, WALK BASS: Styles appropriate for bass playing. RHYTHM GTR 1–5: Styles for rhythm guitar. Styles 2–5 are effective when 3–4 notes are held. 3 FINGER: Three-finger guitar style. STRUM GTR UP, STRUM GTR DOWN, STRUM GTR UP&DW: Guitar chords strummed both up and down. Effective when five or six notes are held. PIANO BACKING, CLAVI CHORD: Styles for keyboard instrument backing. WALTZ, SWING WALTZ: Styles in triple meter. REGGAE: A reggae-type style. Effective when three notes are held. PERCUSSION: A style suitable for percussive instrument. SHAMISEN: The playing style of a Shamisen. BOUND BALL: A style suggestive of a bouncing ball. RANDOM: A style in which the notes sound in random order. BOSSA NOVA: A style with bossanova rhythm guitar. Hold 3–4 notes for best results. You can increase the tempo and use this as a Samba. SALSA: Typical salsa style. Hold 3–4 notes for best results. MAMBO: Typical mambo style. Hold 3–4 notes for best results. LATIN PERCUSSION: A rhythm style with Latin percussion instruments such as Clave, Cowbell, Clap, Bongo, Conga, Agogo etc. SAMBA: Typical samba style. Use for rhythm patterns or bass lines. TANGO: Typical tango rhythm style. Hold the root, 3rd and 5th of a triad etc. for best results. LIMITLESS: The settings of all parameters can be freely combined without restriction. Choices can be set for the Motif, Beat Pattern, Shuffle Rate and Accent Rate parameters for each style. Refer to the “Arpeggio Style List” (p. 268). Octave Range Sets the key range in octaves over which arpeggio will take place. If you want the arpeggio to sound using only the notes that you actually play, set this parameter to 0. To have the arpeggio sound using the notes you play and notes 1 octave higher, set this parameter to +1. A setting of -1 will make the arpeggio sound using the notes you play and notes 1 octave lower.

HOUSE: A style for house piano backing. Hold 3–4 notes for best results. 61 62Chapter 4. Zone Settings Motif Sets the order in which notes of the chord will sound. Some settings will not be available depending on the Style parameter setting. For details on the possible values, refer to “Arpeggio Style List” (p. 268). SINGLE UP: Notes you press will be sounded individually, beginning from low to high. SINGLE DOWN: Notes you press will be sounded individually, from high to low. SINGLE UP&DOWN: Notes you press will be sounded individually, from low to high, and then back down from high to low. SINGLE RANDOM: Notes you press will be sounded individually, in random order. DUAL UP: Notes you press will be sounded two at a time, beginning from low to high. DUAL DOWN: Notes you press will be sounded two at a time, beginning from high to low. DUAL UP&DOWN: Notes you press will be sounded two at a time, from low to high, and then back down from high to low. DUAL RANDOM: Notes you press will be sounded two at a time, in random order. TRIPLE UP: Notes you press will sound three at a time, from low to high. TRIPLE DOWN: Notes you press will sound three at a time, from high to low. TRIPLE UP&DOWN: Notes you press will sound three at a time, from low to high and then back down from high to low. TRIPLE RANDOM: Notes you press will sound three at a time, in random order. NOTE ORDER: Notes you press will be sounded in the order in which you pressed them. By pressing the notes in the appropriate order you can produce melody lines. Up to 128 notes will be remembered. GLISSANDO: Each chromatic step between the highest and lowest notes you press will sound in succession, repeating upward and downward. Press only the lowest and the highest notes. CHORD: All notes you press will sound simultaneously. BASS+CHORD 1–5: The lowest of the notes you play will sound, and the remaining notes will sound as a chord. BASS+UP 1–8: The lowest of the notes you play will sound, and the remaining notes will be arpeggiated. BASS+RND 1–3: The lowest of the notes you play will sound, and the remaining notes will sound in random order. TOP+UP 1–6: The highest of the notes you play will sound, and the remaining notes will be arpeggiated. BASS+UP+TOP: The highest and the lowest of the notes you play will sound, and the remaining notes will be arpeggiated. Beat Pattern Select the beat pattern from the choices below. This setting will affect the location of the accent and length of the notes to determine the beat (rhythm). Some settings will not be available depending on the Style parameter setting. For details on the possible values, refer to “Arpeggio Style List” (p. 268). 1/4, 1/6, 1/8, 1/12, 1/16 1–3, 1/32 1–3, PORTA-A 01–11, PORTA-B 01–15, SEQ-A 1–7, SEQ-B 1–5, SEQ-C 1, 2, SEQ-D 1–8, ECHO 1–3, MUTE 01–16, STRUM 1–8, REGGAE 1, 2, REFRAIN 1, 2, PERC 1–4, WALKBS, HARP, BOUND, RANDOM, BOSSA NOVA, SALSA 1–4, MAMBO 1–2, CLAVE, REV CLA, GUILO, AGOGO, SAMBA, TANGO 1–4, HOUSE 1, 2 If “PORTA-A 01–11, PORTA-B 01–15” is selected as the Beat Pattern, the Time parameter (PATCH/CONTROL/ PATCH PORTAMNT) will control the speed of portamento (p. 76). Adjust the portamento time as appropriate for the playback tempo. (It is not necessary to turn portamento switch on.) Accent Rate Modifies the strength of accents and the length of the notes to adjust the “groove” feel of the arpeggio. A 100% setting will result in the most pronounced “groove” feel. Shuffle Rate This setting lets you modify the note timing to create shuffle rhythms. With a setting of 50%, the notes will sound at equal spacing. As this value is increased, the notes will become more “bouncy,” as if they were dotted notes. fig.04-15Shuffle Rate = 50% Shuffle Rate = 90% 50 50 50 50 90 10 90 10 If the Beat Pattern setting is 1/4, shuffle will not be applied even if you increase the Shuffle Rate setting.

Chapter 4. Zone Settings Key Velocity Specifies the loudness of the notes that you play. Setting the D Beam Controller (D BEAM) If you want the velocity value to change according to how strongly you played each note, set this to REAL. If you want each note to have a fixed velocity regardless of how strongly you play the keyboard, set this parameter to the desired value (1–127). Zone (Arpeggio Zone) Arpeggio Zone sets the Zone for playing an Arpeggio performance when a Layer Performance is being selected. The Arpeggio performance corresponding to the Part connected to the Zone set here is played. When a Single Performance is selected, this setting is disabled, and the single specified Part (current Part) will play arpeggios. Tempo (Arpeggio Tempo) Sets the speed of the arpeggio. When the Clock Source parameter (SYSTEM/SETUP/ SYSTEM SETUP) is set to INT, the display will indicate Tempo(=SYS), and this will be the same value as the system tempo. With a setting of MIDI, the display will indicate Tempo(=EXT), and you will be synchronized to the clock of the external MIDI device. This is where the settings are made for applying effects to the sound by moving your hand over the D Beam controller in Performance mode. When using the D Beam controller in Patch/Rhythm Set/GM mode, the settings are made in System mode (p. 176). D BEAM CONTROL fig.04-16 Assign (D Beam Assign) Specifies the function controlled by the D Beam controller. CC01–31, 33–95: Controller numbers 1–31, 33–95 For more information about Control Change messages, please refer to “MIDI Implementation” (p. 270). PITCH BEND: Pitch Bend AFTERTOUCH: Aftertouch OCT UP: Raises the key range in octave steps (up to 3 octaves higher). OCT DOWN: Lowers the key range in octave steps (up to 3 octaves lower).

START/STOP: Starts/Stops the external sequencer. TAP TEMPO: Tap tempo (a tempo specified by the interval at which you move your hand over the D Beam controller). Output (D Beam Output) Selects the sound generator(s) (the internal sound generator and/or external sound generators connected to MIDI OUT connector) to be controlled by the D Beam controller. OFF: Neither will be controlled. INT: Only the internal sound generator will be controlled. MIDI: Only external sound generators will be controlled. BOTH: Both the internal sound generator and external sound generators will be controlled. Polarity (D Beam Polarity) Switches the polarity of the D Beam controller. With a setting of REVERSE, the direction of control for the D Beam controller will be inverted. 63 64Chapter 4. Zone Settings D BEAM RANGE fig.04-17 Lower (D Beam Range Lower) Specifies the lower limit of the range of the D Beam controller. Values below this setting will not be output. Upper (D Beam Range Upper) Specifies the upper limit of the range of the D Beam controller. Values above this setting will not be output. It is not possible to set the lower limit value above the upper limit, nor can you set the upper limit value below the lower limit. D BEAM SENS fig.04-18 D Beam Sensitivity This sets the D Beam Controller’s sensitivity. The higher the value set, the more readily the D Beam Controller goes into effect. Ordinarily, this is set to 5. The D Beam Controller sensitivity is a System setting, and as such cannot be saved as a Performance setting. Confirming the Settings for Each Zone (INFO) When a Single Performance is selected, this information is disabled. INFO (Zone Information) fig.04-19 In this screen, you can check the following information for each Zone. • MIDI transmit channel (ch): 1–16 • Transmit switch status (tx): On/Off • Part connection status (part): When the Local switch for the currently selected Zone is set to ON, you can check that Zone and the linked Part. Parts 1–16 are shown in order from left to right, and Parts for which the Zone’s MIDI transmit channel and the Part’s MIDI receive channel coincide are indicated by a o or a *. For Parts indicated by a *, you can check the group, number, and name of the Patch or Rhythm Set assigned to that Part in the lower part of the display. When linked to multiple Parts, by pressing or , you can move the * and change the Part being checked. Chapter 5. Creating Patches With the XV-88, you have total control over a wide variety of settings. Each item that can be set is known as a parameter. When you change the values of parameters, you are doing what is referred to as Editing. This chapter explains the procedures used in creating Patches, and the functions of the Patch parameters. How a Patch Is Organized The type of sound most commonly played on the XV-88 is called a Patch. Each Patch can be configured by combining up to four Tones. fig.01-04.e How a Tone Is Organized In the XV-88, the Tone is the smallest class of sound. However, it is not possible to play a Tone by itself. The Patch is the unit of sound which can be played, and the Tones are the basic building blocks which make up the Patch. fig.01-03.e Tones consist of the following five components. WG (Wave Generator) Specifies the PCM waveform (wave) that is the basis of the sound, and determines how the pitch of the sound will change. The XV-88 has 1,083 different waveforms (p. 263). All Patches built into the XV-88 consist of combinations of Tones which are created based on these waveforms. TVF (Time Variant Filter) Specifies how the frequency components of the sound will change. PatchTVA (Time Variant Amplifier) Specifies the volume changes and the sound’s position in a stereo soundfield. Tone 4 Envelope Tone 3 You use Envelope to initiate changes to occur to a sound over Tone 2 time. There are separate envelopes for Pitch, TVF (filter), and Tone 1 LFO 1 LFO 2 TVA (volume). For example if you wish to modify the way in which the sound attacks or decays over time, you would adjust the TVA envelope. LFO (Low Frequency Oscillator) WG Use the LFO to create cyclic changes (modulation) in a sound. The XV-88 has two LFOs. Either one or both can be Pitch applied to effect the WG (pitch), TVF (filter) and/or TVA Envelope (volume). When an LFO is applied to the WG pitch, a vibrato effect is produced. When an LFO is applied to the TVF cutoff frequency, a wah effect is produced. When an LFO is applied to the TVA volume, a tremolo effect is produced. WG Pitch Envelope TVF TVF Envelope TVA TVA Envelope Tone LFO 1 LFO 2 TVF TVA TVF TVA Envelope Envelope audio signal control signal 65 66Chapter 5. Creating Patches How to Make the Patch Settings Start with an existing Patch and edit it to create a new Patch. Each Patch can contain up to four Tones. you should listen to how the individual Tones sound before you edit. Four Tips for Editing Patches Select a Patch that is similar to the sound you wish to create (p. 29). It’s hard to create a new sound that’s exactly what you want if you just select a Patch and modify its parameters at random. It makes sense to start with a Patch whose sound is related to what you have in mind. Decide which Tones will sound (p. 32, p. 81). When creating a Patch, it is important to decide which Tones you are going to use. For each Tone, use the TONE SWITCH [1]–[4] to decide whether to turn it on (have it sound) or off. It is also important to turn off unused Tones to avoid wasting voices, unnecessarily reducing the number of simultaneous notes you can play. A Tone switches on/off each time its respective button is pressed. When a Tone’s indicator lights, it’ll sound. Check the Structure setting (p. 73). The important Type parameter (PATCH/COMMON/ STRUCT) determines how the four Tones combine. Before you select new Tones, make sure you understand how the currently selected Tones are affecting each other. Turn Effects off (p. 105). Since the XV-88 effects have such a profound impact on its sounds. Turn them off to listen to the sound itself so you can better evaluate the changes you’re making. Since you will hear the original sound of the Patch itself when the effects are turned off, the results of your modifications will be easier to hear. Actually, sometimes just changing effects settings can give you the sound you want. 1. Press [PATCH] to access the PATCH PLAY page, and select the Patch whose settings you wish to modify (p. 29). You cannot edit the Patches in the PR-H (GM2) group. If you want to create all your Patches from the ground up, rather than the Patches that have already been prepared, carry out the Initialize operation (p. 185). 2. Press [EDIT] to make the indicator light. 3. Use the function buttons to select a display group. The indicator for the button of the selected display group begins blinking. fig.05-01 4. Use or to select a display page. 5. If you have selected a parameter display that can be set independently for each Tone, the number of the Tone selected for editing will be shown in the upper left of the display. To edit a different Tone, press [EDIT] to temporarily turn off the indicator, and use TONE SELECT [1]–[4] to select a Tone. fig.05-02 • For simultaneously modifying the same parameter for two or more Tones, hold down one of the TONE SELECT [1]–[4] buttons and press another TONE SELECT [1]–[4] button, then another if so desired. Tone numbers other than the first-specified one will be indicated by an * symbol. • To switch Tones on/off, turn off the [EDIT] indicator and then press TONE SWITCH [1]–[4]. 6. Use or to move the cursor to the parameter you wish to modify. 7. Use the VALUE dial, [INC/+]/[DEC/-], or the numeric keys to modify the parameter value. If you’ve selected two or more Tones, your editing will modify the parameter values for all selected Tones by the same amount.

Chapter 5. Creating Patches If you’ve made a mistake in setting a parameter value, or you have second thoughts about the changes, press [UNDO/COMPARE] to restore the value to what it was. 8. If you wish to move to another display group, press [EDIT] to make the indicator light, and use the function buttons. Making Settings While Comparing Tones (Palette Edit) When modifying Tone settings for a Patch, the values for four Tones will be displayed together on a single display. This is called the Palette page. Use it when you want to modify parameter values as you compare the settings of the four Tones. You can also move to another display group by holding down [SHIFT] and using or . Since this can be done even when the [EDIT] indicator is dark, it is a faster way to get around because you don’t have to turn on the [EDIT] indicator each time. 9. Repeat steps 3–8 to complete a Patch. 10.When you finish making settings, press [EXIT] or [PATCH] to return to the PATCH PLAY page. An asterisk * will be displayed at the left of the Patch group. This shows patch settings have been modified. If you select another Patch in the group with an asterisk *, the modified Patch settings will be lost. To keep these modified settings, perform the save operation (p. 164). fig.05-03 1. When modifying a Tone, use or to move the cursor to the parameter you wish to modify. 2. Press [PALETTE EDIT] to call up the Palette page. fig.05-04 3. Press TONE SELECT [1]–[4], or to choose the The button indicator for the selected Tone will light, and the Tone number and Wave name appear in the display. For modifying the same parameter of two or more Tones simultaneously, hold down one of the TONE SELECT [1]–[4] buttons and press another.

Tone to modify. 4. Use the VALUE dial, [INC/+]/[DEC/-], or the numeric keys to change the parameter value. If you’ve selected two or more Tones, your editing will modify the parameter values for all selected Tones by the same amount. If you want to set all selected Tones to the same value, select the Tone having that value by pressing or , and while holding down [SHIFT], press [ENTER]. If you’ve made a mistake in setting a parameter value, or you have second thoughts about the changes, press [UNDO/COMPARE] to restore the value to what it was. 5. If you wish to edit other parameters, press or to select the parameter that you wish to edit. 6. Repeat steps 3–5 to complete a Patch. 7. To exit the Palette page, press [PALETTE EDIT], thus extinguishing the button’s indicator. 67 68Chapter 5. Creating Patches Copying the Settings of Another Tone (Tone Copy) Tone settings from any desired Patch can be copied to any desired Tone of the currently selected Patch. This function can help you save time. 1. Make sure that a Patch is selected. 2. Press [UTILITY], getting its indicator to start blinking. 3. Press the numeric key [2], then or to call up the PATCH TONE CPY page. fig.10-13.e 4. Press the cursor buttons to move the cursor to the parameter you wish to set. 5. Either rotate the VALUE dial or press [INC/+]/[DEC/-] to set the value. • To specify the currently selected Patch as the copy source, set Source to TEMP. • When the cursor is located at Source, you can also use [USER], [PRESET], and [A]–[F] to select a Patch group, and then use numeric keys to specify the Patch number. • By using TONE SWITCH [1]–[4], you can also select the copy source Tone. By using TONE SELECT [1]–[4], you can select the copy destination Tone. 6. Press [ENTER] to execute the Copy operation. When the Copy operation is executed, an * symbol will be displayed in front of the copy-destination Tone. 7. Press [UTILITY] to return to the previous page. Cautions When Selecting a Waveform The sounds of the XV-88 are based on complex PCM waveforms, and if you attempt to make settings that are contrary to the type of the original waveform, the results will not be as you expect. The XV-88’s internal waveforms fall into the following two groups. One-shot: These waveforms contain sounds that have short decays. A one-shot waveform records the initial rise and fall of the sound. Some of the XV-88’s one-shot waveforms are sounds that are complete in themselves, such as percussive instrument sounds. The XV-88 also contains many other one- Copy source Patch Copy source Patch name (group, number) Copy destination Tone shot waveforms that are elements of other sounds. These include attack components such as piano-hammer sounds Copy source Tone and guitar fret noises. Looped: These waveforms include sounds with long decays as well as sustained sounds. Loop waveforms repeatedly play back (loop) the portion of the waveform after the sound has reached a relatively steady state. The XV-88’s looped waveforms also include components of other sounds, such as piano-string resonant vibrations and the hollow sounds of brass instruments. The following diagram shows an example of sound (electric organ) that combines one-shot and looped waveforms. fig.05-05.e TVA ENV for looped Organ waveform (sustain portion) Note off Time TVA ENV for one-shot Key Resulting TVA ENV -click waveform (attack portion) change Level + = Note off

Chapter 5. Creating Patches Cautions When Using a One-shot Waveform Functions of Patch Parameters It is not possible to use the envelope to modify a one-shot waveform to create a decay that is longer than the original waveform, or to turn it into a sustaining sound. If you were to program such an envelope, you would be attempting to shape a portion of the sound that simply doesn’t exist, and the envelope would have no effect. Cautions When Using a Loop Waveform With many acoustic instruments such as piano and sax, extreme timbral changes occur during the first few moments of each note. This initial attack is what defines much of the instrument’s character. For such waveforms, it is best to use the complex tonal changes of the attack portion of the waveform just as they are, and to use the envelope only to modify the decay portion. If you attempt to use the envelope to modify the attack portion as well, the characteristics of the original waveform may prevent you from getting the sound that you intend. fig.05-06.e This section explains the functions the different Patch parameters have, as well as the composition of these parameters. fig.05-01Parameters marked with a 5 can be controlled using specified MIDI messages (Matrix Controller). Settings in the Matrix Control page will determine how these parameters are controlled (p. 78, p. 79). Settings Common to the Entire Patch (COMMON) On this display you can assign a name to a Patch and set the Level volume and pan of the entire Patch. Looped portion Tone change stored with the wave PATCH NAME fig.05-07 Time Envelope for the TVF filter You can assign a name of up to 12 characters to the Patch. For details on assigning names, refer to “Assigning a Name” (p. 28). Resulting tone change PATCH CATEGORY fig.05-08

Category (Patch Category) Specifies the type (category) of the Patch. The Patch Finder function uses this setting. It also determines the phrase that will be sounded when using the Phrase Preview function. For details on the possible category names, refer to (p. 31). 69 70Chapter 5. Creating Patches PATCH LVL&PAN (Patch level & Pan) fig.05-09 Level (Patch Level) Specifies the volume of the Patch. You can specify the level of each Tone in a Patch using the Level parameter (PATCH/TVA/TVA) (p. 90). Pan (Patch Pan) Specifies the pan of the Patch. A setting of L64 is far left, 0 is center, and 63R is far right. You can specify the pan setting for each Tone using the Pan parameter (PATCH/TVA/TVA) (p. 90). Analog Feel (Analog Feel Depth) Specifies the depth of 1/f modulation that is to be applied to the Patch. (1/f modulation is a pleasant and naturally- occurring ratio of modulation that occurs in a babbling brook or rustling wind.) By adding this “1/f modulation,” you can simulate the natural instability characteristic of an analog synthesizer. PATCH OCT&TUNE (Patch Octave & Tune) fig.05-10 Octave (Octave Shift) Adjusts the pitch of the Patch’s sound up or down in units of an octave (+/-3 octaves). Coarse (Coarse Tune) Adjusts the pitch of the Patch’s sound up or down in semitone steps (+/-4 octaves). You can specify the coarse tune of each Tone using the Coarse parameter (PATCH/PITCH/PITCH) (p. 86). Fine (Fine Tune) Adjusts the pitch of the Patch’s sound up or down in 1-cent steps (+/-50 cents). One cent is 1/100th of a semitone. You can specify the fine tune of each Tone using the Fine parameter (PATCH/PITCH/PITCH) (p. 86). Stretch (Stretch Tuning Depth) This setting allows you to apply “stretched tuning” to the Patch. (Stretched tuning is a system by which acoustic pianos are normally tuned, causing the lower range to be lower and the higher range to be higher than the mathematical tuning ratios would otherwise dictate.) With a setting of OFF, the Patch’s tuning will be equal temperament. A setting of 3 will produce the greatest difference in the pitch of the low and high ranges. The diagram shows the pitch change relative to equal temperament that will occur in the low and high ranges. This setting will have a subtle effect on the way in which chords resonate. fig.05-11.e PATCH COMMON fig.05-12 Priority (Voice Priority) This determines how notes will be managed when the XV- 88’s maximum polyphony limit is exceeded (128 voices). LAST: The last-played voices will be given priority, and currently sounding notes will be turned off in order, beginning with the first-played note. LOUDEST: The voices with the loudest volume will be given priority, and currently sounding notes will be turned off, beginning with the lowest-volume voice. Output Assign Specifies for each Patch how the direct sound will be output. MFX: Output in stereo through Multi-Effects. You can also apply Chorus or Reverb to the sound that passes through Multi-effects. Pitch difference from equal temperament Parameter value Low note range 3 21OFF OFF123High note range

Chapter 5. Creating Patches OUTPUT A: Output to the OUTPUT A (MIX) jacks in stereo without passing through Multi-effects. OUTPUT B: Output to the OUTPUT B (MIX) jacks in stereo without passing through Multi-effects. PATCH MODIFY fig.05-14 INDIV 1: Output to the INDIVIDUAL 1 jack in mono without passing through Multi-effects. INDIV 2: Output to the INDIVIDUAL 2 jack in mono without passing through Multi-effects. INDIV 3: Output to the INDIVIDUAL 3 jack in mono without passing through Multi-effects. INDIV 4: Output to the INDIVIDUAL 4 jack in mono without passing through Multi-effects. TONE: Outputs according to the settings for each Tone. • When outputting in mono, the Pan setting is disabled. • When the settings are such that signals are split and output from the INDIVIDUAL 1 jack and INDIVIDUAL 2 jack, and no plug is inserted in the INDIVIDUAL 2 jack, the sounds from INDIVIDUAL 1 and INDIVIDUAL 2 are mixed together, then output from the INDIVIDUAL 1 jack. This sound comprises the sounds from the INDIVIDUAL 1 and 2 jacks. If the Mix/Parallel parameter (SYSTEM/SETUP/ SYSTEM SETUP) is set to MIX, all sounds are output from the OUTPUT A (MIX) jacks in stereo (p. 169). PATCH TEMPO fig.05-13 Clock Source (Patch Clock Source) The LFO cycle, Multi-effects changes, Phrase Loop, and Tone Delay time can be synchronized to a clock (tempo). When this is used by the Patch, this Clock Source setting determines the clock which will be used. PATCH: Synchronize to the Patch Tempo setting. SYSTEM: The global System Tempo or clock messages received from an external sequencer will be used. For details on using clock (tempo), refer to (p. 200). Tempo (Patch Tempo) When Clock Source (Patch Clock Source) is set to PATCH, this setting value is effective. The Patch Tempo Clock does not transmit clock messages from the MIDI OUT connector. Cut (Cutoff Frequency Offset) Cutoff Frequency Offset alters the cutoff frequency of the overall Patch, while preserving the relative differences between the cutoff frequency values set for each Tone in the Cutoff parameters (PATCH/TVF/TVF FILTER) (p. 88). * Cutoff Frequency: the frequency at which the filter begins to have an effect on the waveform’s frequency components. Since the values for the Cutoff parameters for each Tone are added to the values made in this setting, if the Cutoff parameters are set to 127 (maximum), then no further changes are made, even when a positive value is used for this setting. Res (Resonance Offset) Resonance Offset alters the resonance of the overall Patch, while preserving the relative differences between the resonance values set for each Tone in the Resonance parameter (PATCH/TVF/TVF FILTER) (p. 88). * Resonance: emphasizes the overtones in the region of the cutoff frequency, adding character to the sound. Since the values for the Resonance parameters for each Tone are added to the values made in this setting, if the Resonance parameters are set to 127 (maximum), then no further changes are made, even when a positive value is used for this setting. Atk (Attack Time Offset) Attack Time Offset alters the attack time of the overall Patch, while preserving the relative differences between the attack time values set for each Tone in the T1 parameters (PATCH/ TVA/TVA ENVELOPE) (p. 92). * Attack Time: The time it takes for a sound to reach maximum volume after the key is pressed and sound begun Since the values for the T1 parameters for each Tone are added to the values made in this setting, if the T1 parameters are set to 127 (maximum), then no further changes are made, even when a positive value is used for this setting. 71

72Chapter 5. Creating Patches Rel (Release Time Offset) Release Time Offset alters the release time of the overall Patch, while preserving the relative differences between the release time values set for each Tone in the T4 parameters (PATCH/TVA/TVA ENVELOPE) (p. 92). * Release Time: The time from when you take your finger off the key until the sound disappears Since the values for the T4 parameters for each Tone are added to the values made in this setting, if the T4 parameters are set to 127 (maximum), then no further changes are made, even when a positive value is used for this setting. Velocity Sens (Velocity Sensitivity Offset) Velocity Sensitivity Offset alters the Velocity Sensitivity of the overall Patch while preserving the relative differences between the Velocity Sensitivity values set for each Tone in the parameters below. • V-Cutoff parameter (PATCH/TVF/TVF VELOCITY) (p. 89) • V-Sens parameter (PATCH/TVA/TVA) (p. 90) * Velocity: Pressure with which the key is pressed Since this settings value is added to the V-Cutoff and V- Sens parameter values for each Tone, if the V-Cutoff and V-Sens parameter values are set to +63 (maximum), then no further changes are made, even when a positive value is used for this setting. TMT VELO CONTROL (TMT Velocity Control) fig.05-15You can have the XV-88’s keyboard produce different tones according to the register, the force with which the keys are played, or a variety of different MIDI messages. The group of settings affecting this is called the TMT (Tone Mix Table). TMT Velocity Control (TMT Velocity Control Switch) TMT Velocity Control determines whether a different Tone is played (ON) or not (OFF) depending on the force with which the key is played (velocity). When set to RANDOM, the Patch’s constituent Tones will sound randomly, regardless of any Velocity messages. Instead of using Velocity, you can also have Tones substituted using the Matrix Controller (p. 80). However, the keyboard velocity and the Matrix Controller cannot be used simultaneously to switch Tones. When using the Matrix Controller to switch Tones, set the TMT Velocity Control to OFF. TMT VEL RANG (TMT Velocity Range) fig.05-16 Specifies the range of playing dynamics (key velocity) which will sound the Tone. Make these settings when you want different Tones to sound in response to notes played at different strengths. When the TMT Velocity Control parameter (PATCH/ COMMON/TMT VELO CONTROL) is set to OFF, you cannot change the tone that is played according to the force with which the keys are played (velocity). When using the Matrix Controller to have different Tones played, set the range within which the Tone is to be sounded according to the value of the MIDI message used. Lower (Velocity Range Lower) Upper (Velocity Range Upper) For each Tone, specify the lower (Lower) and upper (Upper) limit of the key velocities that will sound the Tone. When a key is played more softly than the lower limit, or more strongly than the upper limit, the sound will either not be heard at all or will be extremely weak. If you attempt to set the Lower velocity limit above the Upper, or the Upper below the Lower, the other value will automatically be adjusted to the same setting. When using the Matrix Controller to have different Tones played, set the lowest value (Lower) and highest value (Upper) of the value of the MIDI message used.

Chapter 5. Creating Patches L.Fade (Velocity Fade Width Lower) U.Fade (Velocity Fade Width Upper) L.Fade and U.Fade set the range within which the volume gradually fades as the velocity approaches the limits of the Velocity Range as set by the Lower and Upper parameters. Use this setting when, for example, you want to have adjacent Tones in Split mode switched smoothly (Velocity Crossfade). The higher the values set, the smoother the switch is between the Tones. When you want the Tones to be switched instantly, set these to 0. fig.05-17.e TMT KEY RANG (TMT Key Range) fig.05-18 These parameters specify the range of notes that will play the Tone. This can be used to make notes in different areas of the keyboard play different Tones. Lower (Key Range Lower) Upper (Key Range Upper) Specify the lower (Lower) and upper (Upper) limits in which each Tone will sound. If you attempt to raise the lower key higher than the upper key, or to lower the upper key below the lower key, the other value will be automatically modified to the same setting. L.Fade (Key Fade Width Lower) U.Fade (Key Fade Width Upper) L.Fade and U.Fade set the range within which the volume gradually fades as the velocity approaches the limits of the Key Range set in the Lower and Upper parameters. Use this setting when, for example, you want to have adjacent Tones in Split mode switched smoothly. The higher the values set, the smoother the switch is between the Tones. When you want the Tones to be switched instantly, set these to 0. fig.03-07.e STRUCT (Structure) fig.05-19 Type (Structure Type) Determines how Tone 1 and 2, or Tone 3 and 4 are connected. The following 10 different Types of combination are available. The display will show how the Tones are combined. The Level displayed symbols have the following meanings. W1 (WG1), W2 (WG2), F1 (TVF1), F2 (TVF2), A1 (TVA1), Velocity A2 (TVA2), B (booster), R (ring modulator) fig.05-20 L.Fade Lower Upper U.Fade With this type, Tones 1 and 2 (or 3 and 4) are independent. Use this type when you want to preserve PCM sounds or create and combine sounds for each Tone. fig.05-21 This type stacks the two filters together to intensify the characteristics of the filters. The TVA for Tone 1 (or 3) controls the volume balance between the two Tones. fig.05-22 This type mixes the sound of tone 1 (3) and tone 2 (4), applies a filter, and then applies a booster to distort the waveform. Level Pitch Lower Upper L.Fade U.Fade TYPE 1 TONE 1 (3) TONE 2 (4) TYPE 2 TONE 1 (3) TONE 2 (4) TYPE 3 TONE 1 (3) TONE 2 (4) TVA TVF WGWG TVF TVA TVA TVF WGWG TVF TVA TVA WGTVF B WG TVF TVA 73

74Chapter 5. Creating Patches fig.05-23 TYPE 4 TONE 1 (3) WGTVA TVF B TONE 2 (4) WG TVF TVA This type applies a booster to distort the waveform, and then combines the two filters. The TVA for Tone 1 (or 3) controls the volume balance between the two Tones and adjusts booster level. fig.05-24 TYPE 5 TONE 1 (3) WGTVA TVF R TONE 2 (4) WG TVF TVA This type uses a ring modulator to create new overtones, and combines the two filters. The Tone 1 (3) TVA will control the volume balance of the two Tones, adjusting the depth of ring modulator. fig.05-25 TYPE 6 TONE 1 (3) WGTVA TVF R TONE 2 (4) WG TVF TVA This type uses a ring modulator to create new overtones, and in addition mixes in the sound of tone 2 (4) and stacks the two filters. Since the ring-modulated sound can be mixed with Tone 2 (4), Tone 1 (3) TVA can adjust the amount of the ring-modulated sound. fig.05-26 TYPE 7 TONE 1 (3) WGTVF TVA R TONE 2 (4) WG TVF TVA This type applies a filter to tone 1 (3) and ring-modulates it with tone 2 (4) to create new overtones. fig.05-27 TYPE 8 TONE 1 (3) WGTVF TVA TONE 2 (4) WG TVF TVA This type sends the filtered Tone 1 (3) and Tone 2 (4) through a ring modulator, and then mixes in the sound of Tone 2 (4) and applies a filter to the result. fig.05-28 TONE 1 (3) TONE 2 (4) This type passes the filtered sound of each tone through a ring modulator to create new overtones. The TVA for Tone 1 (or 3) controls the volume balance between the two Tones and adjusts ring modulation depth. fig.05-29 This type passes the filtered sound of each tone through a ring modulator to create new overtones, and also mixes in the sound of tone 2 (4). Since the ring-modulated sound can be mixed with Tone 2 (4), Tone 1 (3) TVA can adjust the amount of the ring-modulated sound. • If you select a Tone while on the STRUCT page, the Tone paired with the selected Tone will also be selected. • When TYPE 2–10 is selected and one Tone of a pair is turned off, the other Tone will be sounded as TYPE 1 regardless of the displayed setting. • If you limit the keyboard area in which a Tone will sound (Key Range p. 73) or limit the range of velocities for which it will sound (Velocity Range p. 72), the result in areas or ranges where the Tone does not sound is just as if the Tone had been turned off. This means that if TYPE 2–10 is selected and you create a keyboard area or velocity range in which one Tone of a pair does not sound, notes played in that area or range will be sounded by the other Tone as TYPE 1 regardless of the displayed setting. R TYPE 9 TONE 1 (3) TONE 2 (4) WGTVF TVA R WG TVF TVA TYPE 10 WGTVF TVA R WG TVF TVA

Chapter 5. Creating Patches Booster (Booster Gain) When a Structure Type of TYPE 3 or TYPE 4 is selected, you What is a Ring Modulator? can adjust the depth of the booster. The booster increases the input signal in order to distort the sound. This creates the distortion effect frequently used with electric guitars. Higher settings will produce more distortion. A ring modulator multiplies the waveforms of two Tones with each other, generating many new overtones (inharmonic partials) which were not present in either waveform. (Unless one of the waveforms is a sine wave, evenly-spaced frequency components will not usually be What is a Booster? generated.) The Booster is used to distort the incoming signal. As the pitch difference between the two waveforms fig.05-30.e changes the harmonic structure, the result will be an unpitched metallic sound. This function is suitable for creating metallic sounds such as bells. fig.05-32 In addition to using this to create distortion, you can use the waveform (WG1) of one of the Tones as an LFO which shifts the other waveform (WG2) upward or downward to create modulation similar to PWM (pulse width modulation). This parameter works best when you use it in conjunction with the Gain parameter Setting Effects for a Patch (PATCH/WAVE/WAVE) (p. 81). (EFFECTS) fig.05-31.e For details regarding effect settings, refer to the pages shown below. • “Applying Effects in Patch Mode or Rhythm Set Mode” (p. 106) • “Making Multi-Effects Settings” (p. 114) • “Making Chorus Settings” (p. 156) • “Making Reverb Settings” (p. 158) Booster level Uses WG1 as LFO Adjusts WG1 output WG1 TVA Booster WG2 WG2Adds to WG1 Distorted area of the Waveform changes Shift in waveform by WG1 75

76Chapter 5. Creating Patches Using Controllers to Change How Sounds Are Played (CONTROL) The parameters in this group determine how various controllers will affect the Patch and its Tones. PATCH KEY MODE (Patch Key Assign Mode) fig.05-33 Assign (Key Assign) Specifies whether the Patch will play polyphonically (POLY) or monophonically (MONO). The MONO setting is effective when playing a solo instrument Patch such as sax or flute. POLY: Two or more notes can be played simultaneously. MONO: Only the last-played note will sound. Legato (Solo Legato Switch) Solo Legato is valid when the Assign parameter is set to MONO. This setting specifies whether the Solo Legato function will be used (ON) or not (OFF). When the Legato parameter is ON, pressing one key when another is already pressed causes the currently playing note’s pitch to change to that of the newly pressed key while continuing to sound. This can be effective when you wish to simulate performance techniques such as a guitarist’s hammering on and pulling off strings. Legato Retrigger (Legato Retrigger Switch) Legato Retrigger is enabled when the Assign parameter is set to MONO, and the Legato parameter to ON. The setting determines whether sounds are replayed (ON) or not (OFF) when performing legato. This is normally set to ON. When OFF, when one key is held down and another key is then pressed, only the pitch changes, without the attack of the latter key being played. Set this to OFF when performing wind and string phrases or when using modulation with the mono synth keyboard sound. PATCH PORTAMNT (Patch Portamento) fig.05-34 Sw (Portamento Switch) Specifies whether the portamento effect will be applied (ON) or not (OFF). When the Sw parameter is set to OFF, all of the following Portamento settings are disabled. Time (Portamento Time) When portamento is used, this specifies the time over which the pitch will change. Higher settings will cause the pitch change to the next note to take more time. Mode (Portamento Mode) Specifies the performance conditions for which portamento will be applied. NORMAL: Portamento will always be applied. LEGATO: Portamento will be applied only for notes played legato (i.e., when you press a second key before releasing the first. Type (Portamento Type) Specifies the type of portamento effect. RATE: The time it takes will depend on the distance between the two pitches. TIME: The time it takes will be constant, regardless of how far apart in pitch the notes are. What is Portamento? Portamento is a function that causes the Patch’s pitch to change smoothly from one note to the next note played. With the Assign parameter set to MONO, portamento is especially effective when simulating playing techniques such as a violin glissandos. Portamento can also be applied when Key Assign is polyphonic (POLY).

Chapter 5. Creating Patches Start (Portamento Start Pitch) Portamento will begin anew if you press another key during a pitch movement. This setting specifies the pitch at which the change will begin. PITCH: When another key is pressed while the pitch is moving, portamento will begin anew from the pitch that had been reached at that moment. fig.05-35.e NOTE: Portamento will begin anew from the pitch where the current change would end. fig.05-36.e CTRL Rx MIDI (Control Receive MIDI) fig.05-37 fig.05-38 Here you can specify for each Tone how MIDI messages such as pitch bend, expression and pan will be received. • Generally, pitch bend messages control the pitch of the currently sounding note, expression messages control the volume. In addition to this, the XV-88 allows these MIDI messages to be used to control Tone settings or Multi-effects settings as well (p. 78, p. 115). If you are using this capability, turn reception of these MIDI messages OFF. If the receive switch is ON for these Pitch messages, they will control their usual function (in addition to their special function). C5• When assigning (and playing) a Patch to a Part in a Performance, check the MIDI message settings for each MIDI channel (p. 52). If the MIDI channels for that part D4C4 are set not to receive MIDI messages, then the MIDI messages will not be received. press D4 key Time Bender (Receive Pitch Bend Switch) press C5 key Specifies whether Pitch Bend messages will be received (ON) press C4 keyor not (OFF). Expression (Receive Expression Switch) Specifies whether Expression messages will be received (ON) Pitch or not (OFF). Pan Mode (Receive Pan Mode) C5Specifies how Pan messages will be received. CONTINUOUS: Whenever Pan messages are received, the stereo position of the Tone will be changed. D4C4 KEY-ON: The pan of the Tone will be changed only when the next note is played. If a pan message is received while a note Time is sounding, the panning will not change until the next key is press D4 key press C5 key pressed. press C4 keyThe channels cannot be set so as not to receive Pan messages. Hold-1 (Receive Hold 1 Switch) Specifies whether Hold 1 messages will be received (ON) or not (OFF). If NO SUSTAIN is selected for Envelope Mode parameter (PATCH/CONTROL/CTRL Rx MIDI), this setting will have no effect. 77

78Chapter 5. Creating Patches Redamper (Redamper Switch) When a Hold 1 message is received after a key was released but before the sound has completely decayed, this setting specifies whether or not the sound will be sustained at that level. If you want to sustain the sound, set this ON. When using this function, also set the Hold-1 parameter ON. This function is effective for piano sounds. Envelope Mode When a loop-type waveform (p. 68) is selected, it will normally continue to sound as long as a key is pressed. If you want a note to decay naturally even when the key remains pressed, set this to NO SUSTAIN. If a one-shot type Wave (p. 68) is selected, it will not sustain even if this parameter is set to SUSTAIN. TMT CTRL&BENDER (TMT Control & Bender) fig.05-39 TMT Ctrl Sw (TMT Control Switch) Use the Matrix Controller to enable (ON), or disable (OFF) sounding of different tones. You can also cause different tones to sound in response to notes played at different strengths (velocity) on the keyboard. However, the Matrix Controller and the keyboard velocity cannot be used simultaneously to make different Tones to sound. When you want to make the different Tones to sound, set the TMT Velocity Control parameter (PATCH/COMMON/TMT VELO CONTROL) to OFF. Bend Range Specifies the amount of pitch change (in semitones) that will occur when the Pitch Bend Lever is moved (-4– +4 octaves). The left value specifies the pitch change that will occur when the lever is moved fully left. The right value specifies the pitch change that will occur when the lever is moved fully right. For example, if the right value is set to 12, the pitch will rise one octave when the bender lever is moved to the right- most position. MATRIX CTRL SRC (Matrix Control Source) fig.05-40 Control 1–4 (Matrix Control Source 1–4) Sets the MIDI message used to change the Tone parameter with the Matrix Controller. Set this to OFF when the Matrix Controller is not being used. The following are MIDI messages that can be used as Matrix Controllers. • Controller Numbers 01–31, 33–95 (CC01–CC31, CC33– CC95) For more information about Control Change messages, please refer to “MIDI Implementation” (p. 270). • Pitch Bend (PITCH BEND) • Aftertouch (AFTERTOUCH) • System Controller 1–4 (SYS-CTRL1–SYS-CTRL4): MIDI messages used as global Matrix Controllers What is the Matrix Controller? Ordinarily, if you wanted to change Tone parameters using an external MIDI device, you would need to send System Exclusive messages—MIDI messages designed exclusively for the XV-88. However, System Exclusive messages tend to be complicated, and the amount of data that needs to be transmitted can get quite large. For that reason, a number of the more typical of the XV- 88’s Tone parameters have been designed so they accept the use of Control Change (or other) MIDI messages for the purpose of making changes in their values. This provides you with a variety of means of changing the way Patches are played. For example, you can use the Pitch Bend lever to change the LFO cycle rate, or use the keyboard’s touch to open and close a filter. The function which allows you use MIDI messages to make these changes in realtime to the Tone parameters is called the Matrix Controller. Up to four Matrix Controllers can be used in a single Patch. When the Matrix Controller is used, you can select the amount of control (Sns parameter) applied, the parameter selected (Dest parameter), the MIDI message used to transmit the effect (Control 1–4 parameter), and the Tone to which the effect is applied (Tone parameter). Chapter 5. Creating Patches • Velocity (VELOCITY): Pressure you press a key with • Keyfollow (KEYFOLLOW): Keyboard position with C4 as 0 • Tempo (TEMPO): The specified tempo (Patch Tempo/ System Tempo) or MIDI sequencer’s tempo (external tempo) • LFO 1 (LFO1): LFO 1 cycle rate • LFO 2 (LFO2): LFO 2 cycle rate • Pitch Envelope (PITCH ENV) • TVF Envelope (TVF ENV) • There are parameters that determine whether or not Pitch Bend, Controller Number 11 (Expression) and Controller Number 64 (Hold 1) are received (p. 77). When these settings are ON, and the MIDI messages are received, then when any change is made in the settings of the desired parameter, the Pitch Bend, Expression, and Hold 1 settings also change simultaneously. If you want to change the targeted parameters only, then set these to OFF. • TVA Envelope (TVA ENV) Velocity and Keyfollow correspond to Note messages. • You can use the tempo as a Matrix Controller. This lets you change the Tone settings in realtime according to changes in the Tempo. When synchronizing to the Patch tempo, set the Clock Source parameter (PATCH/COMMON/PATCH TEMPO) to PATCH, and specify the Patch tempo with the TEMPO parameter (PATCH/COMMON/PATCH TEMPO). When synchronizing to the System tempo, set the Clock Source parameter (PATCH/COMMON/PATCH TEMPO) to SYSTEM, set the Clock Source parameter (SYSTEM/COMMON/SYSTEM SETUP) to INT, and specify the System tempo with the System Tempo parameter (SYSTEM/COMMON/SYSTEM SETUP). When synchronizing to the tempo of the connected MIDI sequencer, set the Clock Source parameter (PATCH/ COMMON/PATCH TEMPO) to SYSTEM, and set the Clock Source parameter (SYSTEM/COMMON/SYSTEM SETUP) to MIDI. • Although there are no MIDI messages for LFO 1 through TVA Envelope, they can be used as Matrix Controllers. In this case, you can change the Tone settings in realtime by playing Patches. • Select SYS-CTRL1–4 if you want to use the controllers globally for the entire XV-88. MIDI messages used as System Controllers 1–4 are set with the Control 1–4 parameters (SYSTEM/CONTROL/SYS CTRL ASSIGN 1, 2) (p. 173). • There are parameters that determine whether or not specific MIDI messages are received for each MIDI channel (p. 52). When a Patch with Matrix Control settings is assigned to a part, confirm that any MIDI messages used for the Matrix Controller will be received. If the XV-88 is set up such that reception of MIDI messages is disabled, then the Matrix Controller will not function. MATRIX CONTROL 1–4 fig.05-41 Dest (Matrix Control Destination) Matrix Control Destination selects the Tone parameter that is to be controlled when using the Matrix Controller. The following parameters can be controlled. When not controlling parameters with the Matrix Controller, set this to OFF. Up to four parameters (DEST1–4) can be specified for each Matrix Controller, and controlled simultaneously. In this manual, Parameters that can be controlled using the Matrix Controller are marked with a 5. q Opening and Closing the Filter CUTOFF: Changes the cutoff frequency. RESONANCE: Emphasizes the overtones in the region of the cutoff frequency, adding character to the sound. q Changing the Volume, Pan, and Pitch LEVEL: Changes the volume level. PAN: Changes the pan. PITCH: Changes the pitch. 79

80Chapter 5. Creating Patches q Changing How the Effects Are Applied DRY LEVEL: Changes the volume of dry sounds. CHORUS SEND: Changes the amount of Chorus. REVERB SEND: Changes the amount of Reverb. q Applying LFO to Modulate Sounds LFO1/LFO2 PCH DEPTH: Changes the vibrato depth. LFO1/LFO2 TVF DEPTH: Changes the wah depth. LFO1/LFO2 TVA DEPTH: Changes the tremolo depth. LFO1/LFO2 PAN DEPTH: Changes the effect that the LFO will have on pan. LFO1/LFO2 RATE: Changes the speed of the LFO cycles. q Changing the Pitch Envelope PIT ENV A-TIME: Changes the T1 parameter of the pitch envelope. PIT ENV D-TIME: Changes the T2 and T3 parameters of the pitch envelope. PIT ENV R-TIME: Changes the T4 parameter of the pitch envelope. q Changing the TVF Envelope TVF ENV A-TIME: Changes the T1 parameter of the TVF envelope. TVF ENV D-TIME: Changes the T2 and T3 parameters of the TVF envelope. TVF ENV R-TIME: Changes the T4 parameter of the TVF envelope. q Changing the TVA Envelope TVA ENV A-TIME: Changes the T1 parameter of the TVA envelope. TVA ENV D-TIME: Changes the T2 and T3 parameters of the TVA envelope. TVA ENV R-TIME: Changes the T4 parameter of the TVA envelope. q Splitting Tones That Are Played TMT • If the Matrix Controller is used to split Tones, set the TMT Velocity Control parameter (PATCH/COMMON/ TMT VELO CONTROL) to OFF, and the TMT Ctrl Sw parameter (PATCH/CONTROL/CONTROL&BENDER) to ON (p. 72, p. 78). • If the Matrix Controller is used to split Tones, we recommend setting the Sns to +63. Selecting a lower value may prevent switching of the Tones. Furthermore, if you want to reverse the effect, set the value to -63. • When you want to use the Matrix Controller to make the switch between Tones more smoothly, set the L.Fade and U.Fade parameters (PATCH/COMMON/TMT VELO RANG) (p. 73). The higher the values set, the smoother the switch is between the Tones. q Changing the Depth of Frequency Modulation for FXM FXM DEPTH q Changing Specific Multi-Effects Parameters MFX CTRL1: The specified parameter is changed by the MFX CTRL1 Destination parameter. MFX CTRL2: The specified parameter is changed by the MFX CTRL2 Destination parameter. MFX CTRL3: The specified parameter is changed by the MFX CTRL3 Destination parameter. MFX CTRL4: The specified parameter is changed by the MFX CTRL4 Destination parameter. No effects are available, even with the Matrix Controller, when the settings are such that no Multi-effects are applied. Sns (Matrix Control Sensitivity) Sets the amount of the Matrix Controller’s effect that is applied. To make an increase in the currently selected value (to get higher values, move to the right, increase rates, and so on), select a positive value; to make a decrease in the currently selected value (to get lower values, move to the left, decrease rates, and so on), select a negative value. When both positive and negative are selected, the changes are greater as the value increases. To have no effect applied, select 0. Tone (Matrix Control Tone) Matrix Control Tone selects the Tone to which the effect is applied when using the Matrix Controller. Indicated from left to right are Tones 1, 2, 3, and 4. Tones to which effects are applied are indicated by a circle (o) for the setting; Tones to which no effects are applied are indicated by an underline (_). With a setting of R, the effect will be inverted.


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