MICROCHIP AVR128DA48 CURIOSITY NANO (01) PDF MANUAL


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PDF Content Summary: • MPLAB® X IDE and Atmel Studio - Software to discover, configure, develop, program, and debug Microchip microcontrollers. • Code examples in Atmel START - Get started with code examples or generate drivers for a custom application. • Code examples on GitHub - Get started with code examples. • AVR128DA48 website - Find documentation, datasheets, sample, and purchase microcontrollers. • AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano website - Kit information, latest user guide and design documentation. © 2020 Microchip Technology Inc. User Guide DS50002971A-page 1 AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano User Guide Preface The AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Evaluation Kit is a hardware platform to evaluate microcontrollers in the AVR-DA family. This board has the AVR128DA48 microcontroller (MCU) mounted. Supported by Atmel Studio and Microchip MPLAB® X Integrated Development Environments (IDEs), the board provides easy access to the features of the AVR128DA48 to explore how to integrate the device into a custom design. The Curiosity Nano series of evaluation boards include an on-board debugger. No external tools are necessary to program and debug the AVR128DA48. AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Table of Contents Preface...........................................................................................................................................................1 1. Introduction............................................................................................................................................. 4 1.1. Features....................................................................................................................................... 4 1.2. Kit Overview................................................................................................................................. 4 2. Getting Started........................................................................................................................................5 2.1. Quick Start....................................................................................................................................5 2.2. Design Documentation and Relevant Links................................................................................. 5 3. Curiosity Nano.........................................................................................................................................7 3.1. On-Board Debugger Overview.....................................................................................................7 3.1.1. Debugger.......................................................................................................................7 3.1.2. Virtual Serial Port (CDC)................................................................................................8 3.1.2.1. Overview..................................................................................................... 8 3.1.2.2. Operating System Support..........................................................................8 3.1.2.3. Limitations................................................................................................... 9 3.1.2.4. Signaling......................................................................................................9 3.1.2.5. Advanced Use.............................................................................................9 3.1.3. Mass Storage Device...................................................................................................10 3.1.3.1. Mass Storage Device Implementation.......................................................10 3.1.3.2. Fuse Bytes.................................................................................................11 3.1.3.3. Limitations of Drag-and-Drop Programming..............................................11 3.1.3.4. Special Commands................................................................................... 11 3.1.4. Data Gateway Interface (DGI).....................................................................................12 3.1.4.1. Debug GPIO..............................................................................................12 3.1.4.2. Timestamping............................................................................................12 3.2. Curiosity Nano Standard Pinout.................................................................................................13 3.3. Power Supply.............................................................................................................................13 3.3.1. Target Regulator..........................................................................................................14 3.3.2. External Supply............................................................................................................15 3.3.3. VBUS Output Pin.........................................................................................................16 3.3.4. Power Supply Exceptions............................................................................................16 3.4. Low Power Measurement...........................................................................................................17 3.5. Programming External Microcontrollers..................................................................................... 18 3.5.1. Supported Devices...................................................................................................... 18 3.5.2. Software Configuration................................................................................................18 3.5.3. Hardware Modifications...............................................................................................19 3.5.4. Connecting to External Microcontrollers......................................................................20 3.6. Connecting External Debuggers................................................................................................ 21 4. Hardware User Guide........................................................................................................................... 24 4.1. Connectors.................................................................................................................................24 4.1.1. AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Pinout...........................................................................24 4.1.2. Using Pin Headers.......................................................................................................24 4.2. Peripherals.................................................................................................................................25 © 2020 Microchip Technology Inc. User Guide DS50002971A-page 2 AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano 4.2.1. LED..............................................................................................................................25 4.2.2. Mechanical Switch.......................................................................................................25 4.2.3. Crystal..........................................................................................................................25 4.2.4. On-Board Debugger Implementation...........................................................................26 4.2.4.1. On-Board Debugger Connections.............................................................26 5. Hardware Revision History and Known Issues..................................................................................... 27 5.1. Identifying Product ID and Revision...........................................................................................27 5.2. Revision 3...................................................................................................................................27 6. Document Revision History...................................................................................................................28 7. Appendix............................................................................................................................................... 29 7.1. Schematic...................................................................................................................................29 7.2. Assembly Drawing......................................................................................................................31 7.3. Curiosity Nano Base for Click boardsTM...................................................................................... 32 7.4. Disconnecting the On-board Debugger......................................................................................33 7.5. Getting Started with IAR.............................................................................................................34 The Microchip Website.................................................................................................................................37 Product Change Notification Service............................................................................................................37 Customer Support........................................................................................................................................ 37 Microchip Devices Code Protection Feature................................................................................................37 Legal Notice................................................................................................................................................. 37 Trademarks.................................................................................................................................................. 38 Quality Management System....................................................................................................................... 38 Worldwide Sales and Service.......................................................................................................................39 © 2020 Microchip Technology Inc. User Guide DS50002971A-page 3 AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Introduction 1. Introduction 1.1 Features • AVR128DA48-I/PT Microcontroller • One Yellow User LED • One Mechanical User Switch • One 32.768 kHz Crystal • On-Board Debugger: – Board identification in Atmel Studio/Microchip MPLAB® X IDE – One green power and status LED – Programming and debugging – Virtual serial port (CDC) – Two debug GPIO channels (DGI GPIO) • USB Powered • Adjustable Target Voltage: – MIC5353 LDO regulator controlled by the on-board debugger – 1.8-5.1V output voltage (limited by USB input voltage) – 500 mA maximum output current (limited by ambient temperature and output voltage) 1.2 Kit Overview The Microchip AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Evaluation Kit is a hardware platform to evaluate the AVR128DA48 microcontroller. Figure 1-1. AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Evaluation Kit Overview

AVR128DA48 MCU Micro USB Connector Debugger Power/Status LED 32.768 kHz Crystal 32.768 kHz Crystal User LED (LED0) User LED (LED0) User LED (LED0) User Switch (SW0) User Switch (SW0) User Switch (SW0) User Switch (SW0)

© 2020 Microchip Technology Inc. User Guide DS50002971A-page 4 AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Getting Started 2. Getting Started 2.1 Quick Start Steps to start exploring the AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Board: 1. Download Atmel Studio/Microchip MPLAB® X IDE. 2. Launch Atmel Studio/Microchip MPLAB® X IDE. 3. Optional: Use MPLAB® Code Configurator or Atmel START to generate drivers and examples. 4. Write your application code. 5. Connect a USB cable (Standard-A to Micro-B or Micro-AB) between the PC and the debug USB port on the board. Driver Installation When the board is connected to your computer for the first time, the operating system will perform a driver software installation. The driver file supports both 32- and 64-bit versions of Microsoft® Windows® XP, Windows Vista®, Windows 7, Windows 8, and Windows 10. The drivers for the board are included with Atmel Studio/Microchip MPLAB® X IDE. Kit Window Once the board is powered, the green status LED will be lit, and Atmel Studio/Microchip MPLAB® X IDE will auto- detect which boards are connected. Atmel Studio/Microchip MPLAB® X IDE will present relevant information like data sheets and board documentation. The AVR128DA48 device on the AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Board is programmed and debugged by the on-board debugger and, therefore, no external programmer or debugger tool is required. Tip: The Kit Window can be opened in MPLAB X IDE through the menu bar Window > Kit Window. 2.2 Design Documentation and Relevant Links The following list contains links to the most relevant documents and software for the AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Board: • MPLAB® X IDE - MPLAB X IDE is a software program that runs on a PC (Windows®, Mac OS®, Linux®) to develop applications for Microchip microcontrollers and digital signal controllers. It is called an Integrated Development Environment (IDE) because it provides a single integrated “environment” to develop code for embedded microcontrollers. • Atmel Studio - Free IDE for the development of C/C++ and assembler code for microcontrollers. • IAR Embedded Workbench® for AVR® - This is a commercial C/C++ compiler that is available for AVR microcontrollers. There is a 30-day evaluation version as well as a 4 KB code-size-limited kick-start version available from their website. • MPLAB® Code Configurator - MPLAB Code Configurator (MCC) is a free software plug-in that provides a graphical interface to configure peripherals and functions specific to your application. • Atmel START - Atmel START is an online tool that hosts code examples, helps the user to select and configure software components, and tailor your embedded application in a usable and optimized manner. • Microchip Sample Store - Microchip sample store where you can order samples of devices. • MPLAB Data Visualizer - MPLAB Data Visualizer is a program used for processing and visualizing data. The Data Visualizer can receive data from various sources such as serial ports and on-board debugger’s Data Gateway Interface, as found on Curiosity Nano and Xplained Pro boards. © 2020 Microchip Technology Inc. User Guide DS50002971A-page 5 AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Getting Started • Studio Data Visualizer - Studio Data Visualizer is a program used for processing and visualizing data. The Data Visualizer can receive data from various sources such as serial ports, on-board debugger’s Data Gateway Interface as found on Curiosity Nano and Xplained Pro boards, and power data from the Power Debugger. • Microchip PIC® and AVR Examples - Microchip PIC and AVR Device Examples is a collection of examples and labs that use Microchip development boards to showcase the use of PIC and AVR device peripherals. • Microchip PIC® and AVR Solutions - Microchip PIC and AVR Device Solutions contains complete applications for use with Microchip development boards, ready to be adapted and extended. • AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano website - Kit information, latest user guide and design documentation. • AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano on microchipDIRECT - Purchase this kit on microchipDIRECT. © 2020 Microchip Technology Inc. User Guide DS50002971A-page 6 AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Curiosity Nano 3. Curiosity Nano Curiosity Nano is an evaluation platform of small boards with access to most of the microcontrollers I/Os. The platform consists of a series of low pin count microcontroller (MCU) boards with on-board debuggers, which are integrated with Atmel Studio/Microchip MPLAB® X IDE. Each board is identified in the IDE. When plugged in, a Kit Window is displayed with links to key documentation, including relevant user guides, application notes, data sheets, and example code. Everything is easy to find. The on-board debugger features a virtual serial port (CDC) for serial communication to a host PC and a Data Gateway Interface (DGI) with debug GPIO pin(s). 3.1 On-Board Debugger Overview AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano contains an on-board debugger for programming and debugging. The on-board debugger is a composite USB device consisting of several interfaces: • A debugger that can program and debug the AVR128DA48 in Atmel Studio/Microchip MPLAB® X IDE • A mass storage device that allows drag-and-drop programming of the AVR128DA48 • A virtual serial port (CDC) that is connected to a Universal Asynchronous Receiver/Transmitter (UART) on the AVR128DA48, and provides an easy way to communicate with the target application through terminal software • A Data Gateway Interface (DGI) for code instrumentation with logic analyzer channels (debug GPIO) to visualize program flow The on-board debugger controls a Power and Status LED (marked PS) on the AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Board. The table below shows how the LED is controlled in different operation modes. Table 3-1. On-Board Debugger LED Control Operation Mode Power and Status LED Boot Loader mode The LED blinks slowly during power-up. Power-up The LED is ON. Normal operation The LED is ON. Programming Activity indicator: The LED blinks slowly during programming/debugging. Drag-and-drop programming Success: The LED blinks slowly for 2 sec. Failure: The LED blinks rapidly for 2 sec. Fault The LED blinks rapidly if a power fault is detected. Sleep/Off The LED is OFF. The on-board debugger is either in a sleep mode or powered down. This can occur if the board is externally powered. Info: Slow blinking is approximately 1 Hz, and rapid blinking is approximately 5 Hz. 3.1.1 Debugger The on-board debugger on the AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Board appears as a Human Interface Device (HID) on the host computer’s USB subsystem. The debugger supports full-featured programming and debugging of the AVR128DA48 using Atmel Studio/Microchip MPLAB® X IDE, as well as some third-party IDEs. © 2020 Microchip Technology Inc. User Guide DS50002971A-page 7 AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Curiosity Nano Remember: Keep the debugger’s firmware up-to-date. Firmware upgrades are done automatically when using Atmel Studio/Microchip MPLAB® X IDE. 3.1.2 Virtual Serial Port (CDC) The virtual serial port (CDC) is a general purpose serial bridge between a host PC and a target device. 3.1.2.1 Overview The on-board debugger implements a composite USB device that includes a standard Communications Device Class (CDC) interface, which appears on the host as a virtual serial port. The CDC can be used to stream arbitrary data in both directions between the host computer and the target: All characters sent through the virtual serial port on the host computer will be transmitted as UART on the debugger’s CDC TX pin, and UART characters captured on the debugger’s CDC RX pin will be returned to the host computer through the virtual serial port. Figure 3-1. CDC Connection PC Terminal Debugger Target Target MCU Terminal Software Send USB CDC TX CDC RX © 2020 Microchip Technology Inc. User Guide DS50002971A-page 8 Receive Target UART RX Terminal UART TX Receive Send Info: As shown in Figure 3-1, the debugger’s CDC TX pin is connected to a UART RX pin on the target for receiving characters from the host computer. Similarly, the debugger’s CDC RX pin is connected to a UART TX pin on the target for transmitting characters to the host computer. 3.1.2.2 Operating System Support On Windows machines, the CDC will enumerate as Curiosity Virtual COM Port and appear in the Ports section of the Windows Device Manager. The COM port number can also be found there. Info: On older Windows systems, a USB driver is required for CDC. This driver is included in installations of Atmel Studio/Microchip MPLAB® X IDE. On Linux machines, the CDC will enumerate and appear as /dev/ttyACM#. Info: tty* devices belong to the “dialout” group in Linux, so it may be necessary to become a member of that group to have permissions to access the CDC. On MAC machines, the CDC will enumerate and appear as /dev/tty.usbmodem#. Depending on which terminal program is used, it will appear in the available list of modems as usbmodem#. AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Curiosity Nano Info: For all operating systems: Be sure to use a terminal emulator that supports DTR signaling. See 3.1.2.4 Signaling. 3.1.2.3 Limitations Not all UART features are implemented in the on-board debugger CDC. The constraints are outlined here: • Baud rate: Must be in the range of 1200 bps to 500 kbps. Any baud rate outside this range will be set to the closest limit, without warning. Baud rate can be changed on-the-fly. • Character format: Only 8-bit characters are supported. • Parity: Can be odd, even, or none. • Hardware flow control: Not supported. • Stop bits: One or two bits are supported. 3.1.2.4 Signaling During USB enumeration, the host OS will start both communication and data pipes of the CDC interface. At this point, it is possible to set and read back the baud rate and other UART parameters of the CDC, but data sending and receiving will not be enabled. When a terminal connects on the host, it must assert the DTR signal. As this is a virtual control signal implemented on the USB interface, it is not physically present on the board. Asserting the DTR signal from the host will indicate to the on-board debugger that a CDC session is active. The debugger will then enable its level shifters (if available), and start the CDC data send and receive mechanisms. Deasserting the DTR signal will not disable the level shifters but disable the receiver so no further data will be streamed to the host. Data packets that are already queued up for sending to the target will continue to be sent out, but no further data will be accepted. Remember: Set up the terminal emulator to assert the DTR signal. Without the signal, the on-board debugger will not send or receive any data through its UART. Tip: The on-board debugger’s CDC TX pin will not be driven until the CDC interface is enabled by the host computer. Also, there are no external pull-up resistors on the CDC lines connecting the debugger and the target, which means that during power-up, these lines are floating. To avoid any glitches resulting in unpredictable behavior like framing errors, the target device should enable the internal pull-up resistor on the pin connected to the debugger’s CDC TX pin. 3.1.2.5 Advanced Use CDC Override Mode In normal operation, the on-board debugger is a true UART bridge between the host and the device. However, in certain use cases, the on-board debugger can override the basic operating mode and use the CDC TX and RX pins for other purposes. Dropping a text file into the on-board debugger’s mass storage drive can be used to send characters out of the debugger’s CDC TX pin. The filename and extension are trivial, but the text file must start with the characters: CMD:SEND_UART= The maximum message length is 50 characters – all remaining data in the frame are ignored. The default baud rate used in this mode is 9600 bps, but if the CDC is already active or has been configured, the previously used baud rate still applies. © 2020 Microchip Technology Inc. User Guide DS50002971A-page 9 AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Curiosity Nano USB-Level Framing Considerations Sending data from the host to the CDC can be done byte-wise or in blocks, which will be chunked into 64-byte USB frames. Each such frame will be queued up for sending to the debugger’s CDC TX pin. Transferring a small amount of data per frame can be inefficient, particularly at low baud rates, because the on-board debugger buffers frames and not bytes. A maximum of four 64-byte frames can be active at any time. The on-board debugger will throttle the incoming frames accordingly. Sending full 64-byte frames containing data is the most efficient method. When receiving data on the debugger’s CDC RX pin, the on-board debugger will queue up the incoming bytes into 64-byte frames, which are sent to the USB queue for transmission to the host when they are full. Incomplete frames are also pushed to the USB queue at approximately 100 ms intervals, triggered by USB start-of-frame tokens. Up to eight 64-byte frames can be active at any time. If the host (or the software running on it) fails to receive data fast enough, an overrun will occur. When this happens, the last-filled buffer frame will be recycled instead of being sent to the USB queue, and a full frame of data will be lost. To prevent this occurrence, the user must ensure that the CDC data pipe is being read continuously, or the incoming data rate must be reduced. 3.1.3 Mass Storage Device The on-board debugger includes a simple Mass Storage Device implementation, which is accessible for read/write operations via the host operating system to which it is connected. It provides: • Read access to basic text and HTML files for detailed kit information and support • Write access for programming Intel® HEX formatted files into the target device’s memory • Write access for simple text files for utility purposes 3.1.3.1 Mass Storage Device Implementation The on-board debugger implements a highly optimized variant of the FAT12 file system that has several limitations, partly due to the nature of FAT12 itself and optimizations made to fulfill its purpose for its embedded application. The Curiosity Nano USB Device is USB Chapter 9-compliant as a mass storage device but does not, in any way, fulfill the expectations of a general purpose mass storage device. This behavior is intentional. When using the Windows operating system, the on-board debugger enumerates as a Curiosity Nano USB Device that can be found in the disk drives section of the device manager. The CURIOSITY drive appears in the file manager and claims the next available drive letter in the system. The CURIOSITY drive contains approximately one MB of free space. This does not reflect the size of the target device’s Flash in any way. When programming an Intel® HEX file, the binary data are encoded in ASCII with metadata providing a large overhead, so one MB is a trivially chosen value for disk size. It is not possible to format the CURIOSITY drive. When programming a file to the target, the filename may appear in the disk directory listing. This is merely the operating system’s view of the directory, which, in reality, has not been updated. It is not possible to read out the file contents. Removing and replugging the board will return the file system to its original state, but the target will still contain the application that has been previously programmed. To erase the target device, copy a text file starting with “CMD:ERASE” onto the disk. By default, the CURIOSITY drive contains several read-only files for generating icons as well as reporting status and linking to further information: • AUTORUN.ICO – icon file for the Microchip logo • AUTORUN.INF – system file required for Windows Explorer to show the icon file • KIT-INFO.HTM – redirect to the development board website • KIT-INFO.TXT – a text file containing details about the board’s debugger firmware version, board name, USB serial number, device, and drag-and-drop support • STATUS.TXT – a text file containing the programming status of the board © 2020 Microchip Technology Inc. User Guide DS50002971A-page 10 AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Curiosity Nano Info: STATUS.TXT is dynamically updated by the on-board debugger. The contents may be cached by the OS and, therefore, do not reflect the correct status. 3.1.3.2 Fuse Bytes Fuse Bytes (AVR® MCU Targets) When doing drag-and-drop programming, the debugger masks out fuse bits that attempt to disable Unified Program and Debug Interface (UPDI). This means that the UPDI pin cannot be used in its reset or GPIO modes; selecting one of the alternative functions on the UPDI pin would render the device inaccessible without using an external debugger capable of high-voltage UPDI activation. 3.1.3.3 Limitations of Drag-and-Drop Programming Lock Bits Lock bits included in the hex file will be ignored when using drag-and-drop programming. To program lock bits, use Atmel Studio/Microchip MPLAB® X IDE. Enabling CRC Check in Fuses It is not advisable to enable the CRC check in the target device’s fuses when using drag-and-drop programming. This because a subsequent chip erase (which does not affect fuse bits) will effect a CRC mismatch, and the application will fail to boot. To recover a target from this state, a chip erase must be done using Atmel Studio/Microchip MPLAB® X IDE, which will automatically clear the CRC fuses after erasing. 3.1.3.4 Special Commands Several utility commands are supported by copying text files to the mass storage disk. The filename or extension is irrelevant – the command handler reacts to content only. Table 3-2. Special File Commands Command Content Description CMD:ERASE Executes a chip erase of the target CMD:SEND_UART= Sends a string of characters to the CDC UART. See “CDC Override Mode”. CMD:RESET Resets the target device by entering Programming mode and then exiting Programming mode immediately thereafter. Exact timing can vary according to the programming interface of the target device. (Debugger firmware v1.16 or newer.) CMD:POWERTOGGLE Powers down the target and restores power after a 100 ms delay. If external power is provided, this has no effect. (Debugger firmware v1.16 or newer.) CMD:0V Powers down the target device by disabling the target supply regulator. If external power is provided, this has no effect. (Debugger firmware v1.16 or newer.) CMD:3V3 Sets the target voltage to 3.3V. If external power is provided, this has no effect. (Debugger firmware v1.16 or newer.) CMD:5V0 Sets the target voltage to 5.0V. If external power is provided, this has no effect. (Debugger firmware v1.16 or newer.) © 2020 Microchip Technology Inc. User Guide DS50002971A-page 11 AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Curiosity Nano Info: The commands listed here are triggered by the content being sent to the mass storage emulated disk, and no feedback is provided in the case of either success or failure. 3.1.4 Data Gateway Interface (DGI) Data Gateway Interface (DGI) is a USB interface for transporting raw and timestamped data between on-board debuggers and host computer-based visualization tools. MPLAB Data Visualizer is used on the host computer to display debug GPIO data. It is available as a plug-in for MPLAB® X IDE or a stand-alone application that can be used in parallel with Atmel Studio/Microchip MPLAB® X IDE. Although DGI encompasses several physical data interfaces, the AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano implementation includes logic analyzer channels: • Two debug GPIO channels (also known as DGI GPIO) 3.1.4.1 Debug GPIO Debug GPIO channels are timestamped digital signal lines connecting the target application to a host computer visualization application. They are typically used to plot the occurrence of low-frequency events on a time-axis – for example, when certain application state transitions occur. The figure below shows the monitoring of the digital state of a mechanical switch connected to a debug GPIO in MPLAB Data Visualizer. Figure 3-2. Monitoring Debug GPIO with MPLAB® Data Visualizer Debug GPIO channels are timestamped, so the resolution of DGI GPIO events is determined by the resolution of the DGI timestamp module. Important: Although bursts of higher-frequency signals can be captured, the useful frequency range of signals for which debug GPIO can be used is up to about 2 kHz. Attempting to capture signals above this frequency will result in data saturation and overflow, which may cause the DGI session to be aborted. 3.1.4.2 Timestamping DGI sources are timestamped as they are captured by the debugger. The timestamp counter implemented in the Curiosity Nano debugger increments at 2 MHz frequency, providing a timestamp resolution of a half microsecond. © 2020 Microchip Technology Inc. User Guide DS50002971A-page 12 AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Curiosity Nano 3.2 Curiosity Nano Standard Pinout The 12 edge connections closest to the USB connector on Curiosity Nano boards have a standardized pinout. The program/debug pins have different functions depending on the target programming interface, as shown in the table and figure below. Table 3-3. Curiosity Nano Standard Pinout Debugger Signal Target MCU Description ID — ID line for extensions CDC TX UART RX USB CDC TX line CDC RX UART TX USB CDC RX line DBG0 UPDI Debug data line DBG1 GPIO1 debug GPIO1 DBG2 GPIO0 debug GPIO0 DBG3 RESET Reset line NC — No connect VBUS — VBUS voltage for external use VOFF — Voltage Off input. Disables the target regulator and target voltage when pulled low. VTG — Target voltage GND — Common ground Figure 3-3. Curiosity Nano Standard Pinout USB NCPS LED ID CDC RX DEBUGGER CDC TX DBG1 DBG2 © 2020 Microchip Technology Inc. User Guide DS50002971A-page 13 VBUS VOFF DBG3 DBG0 GND CURIOSITY NANO VTG 3.3 Power Supply The board is powered through the USB port and contains two LDO regulators, one to generate 3.3V for the on-board debugger, and an adjustable LDO regulator for the target microcontroller AVR128DA48 and its peripherals. The voltage from the USB connector can vary between 4.4V to 5.25V (according to the USB specification) and will limit the maximum voltage to the target. The figure below shows the entire power supply system on AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano. AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Curiosity Nano Figure 3-4. Power Supply Block Diagram VTG Target VREG Regulator VLVL Power Supply Target Power strap strap Measure On/Off USB Adjust I/O Level I/O GPIO shifter straps #VOFF ID system 3.3.1 Target Regulator The target voltage regulator is a MIC5353 variable output LDO. The on-board debugger can adjust the voltage output supplied to the board target section by manipulating the MIC5353’s feedback voltage. The hardware implementation is limited to an approximate voltage range from 1.7V to 5.1V. Additional output voltage limits are configured in the debugger firmware to ensure that the output voltage never exceeds the hardware limits of the AVR128DA48 microcontroller. The voltage limits configured in the on-board debugger on AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano are 1.8-5.1V. Info: The target voltage is set to 3.3V when the board is manufactured. It can be changed through MPLAB X IDE project properties and in the Atmel Studio device programming dialog. Any change to the target voltage is persistent, even through a power toggle. The resolution is less than 5 mV but may be limited to 10 mV by the adjustment program. Info: Voltage settings that are set up in Atmel Studio/Microchip MPLAB® X IDE are not immediately applied to the board. The new voltage setting is applied to the board when the debugger is accessed in any way, like pushing the Refresh Debug Tool Status button in the project dashboard tab, or programming/ reading program memory. Info: There is a simple option to adjust the target voltage with a drag and drop command text file to the board. This only supports settings of 0.0V, 3.3V, and 5.0V. See section 3.1.3.4 Special Commands for further details. The MIC5353 supports a maximum current load of 500 mA. It is an LDO regulator in a small package, placed on a small printed circuit board (PCB), and the thermal shutdown condition can be reached at lower loads than 500 mA. The maximum current load depends on the input voltage, the selected output voltage, and the ambient temperature. The figure below shows the safe operating area for the regulator, with an input voltage of 5.1V and an ambient temperature of 23°C. © 2020 Microchip Technology Inc. User Guide DS50002971A-page 14 Target MCU Power source Cut strap VUSB On/Off Power consumer P3V3 DEBUGGER I/O Power converter DEBUGGER PTC Regulator Fuse Power protection VBUS AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Curiosity Nano Figure 3-5. Target Regulator Safe Operation Area The voltage output of the target regulator is continuously monitored (measured) by the on-board debugger. If it is more than 100 mV over/under the voltage setting value, an error condition will be flagged, and the target voltage regulator will be turned off. This will detect and handle any short-circuit conditions. It will also detect and handle if an external voltage which causes VCC_TARGET to move outside of the voltage setting monitoring window of ±100 mV is suddenly applied to the VTG pin, without setting the VOFF pin low. Info: If the external voltage is lower than the monitoring window lower limit (target voltage setting - 100 mV), the on-board debugger status LED will blink rapidly. If the external voltage is higher than the monitoring window upper limit (target voltage setting + 100 mV), the on-board debugger status LED will continue to shine. If the external voltage is removed, the status LED will start to blink rapidly until the on- board debugger detects the new situation and turns the target voltage regulator back on. 3.3.2 External Supply AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano can be powered by an external voltage instead of the on-board target regulator. When the Voltage Off (VOFF) pin is shorted to ground (GND), the on-board debugger firmware disables the target regulator, and it is safe to apply an external voltage to the VTG pin. It is also safe to apply an external voltage to the VTG pin when no USB cable is plugged into the DEBUG connector on the board. The VOFF pin can be tied low/let go at any time. This will be detected by a pin-change interrupt to the on-board debugger, which controls the target voltage regulator accordingly. WARNING Applying an external voltage to the VTG pin without shorting VOFF to GND may cause permanent damage to the board. WARNING Do not apply any voltage to the VOFF pin. Let the pin float to enable the power supply. WARNING Absolute maximum external voltage is 5.5V for the on-board level shifters, and the standard operating condition of the AVR128DA48 is 1.8-5.5V. Applying a higher voltage may cause permanent damage to the board. © 2020 Microchip Technology Inc. User Guide DS50002971A-page 15 AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Curiosity Nano Info: If an external voltage is applied without pulling the VOFF pin low and an external supply pulls the voltage lower than the monitoring window lower limit (target voltage setting - 100 mV), the on-board debugger status LED will blink rapidly and shut the on-board regulator off. If an external voltage is suddenly removed when the VOFF pin is not pulled low, the status LED will start to blink rapidly, until the on-board debugger detects the new situation and switches the target voltage regulator back on. Programming, debugging, and data streaming is still possible with an external power supply – the debugger and signal level shifters will be powered from the USB cable. Both regulators, the debugger and the level shifters, are powered down when the USB cable is removed. Info: In addition to the power consumed by the AVR128DA48 and its peripherals, approximately 100 μA will be drawn from any external power source to power the on-board level shifters and voltage monitor circuitry when a USB cable is plugged in the DEBUG connector on the board. When a USB cable is not plugged in, some current is used to supply the level shifters voltage pins, which have a worst-case current consumption of approximately 5 μA. Typical values may be as low as 100 nA. 3.3.3 VBUS Output Pin AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano has a VBUS output pin that can be used to power external components that need a 5V supply. The VBUS output pin has a PTC fuse to protect the USB against short circuits. A side effect of the PTC fuse is a voltage drop on the VBUS output with higher current loads. The chart below shows the voltage versus the current load of the VBUS output. Figure 3-6. VBUS Output Voltage vs. Current 3.3.4 Power Supply Exceptions This is a summary of most exceptions that can occur with the power supply. Target Voltage Shuts Down This can happen if the target section draws too much current at a given voltage. This will cause the thermal shutdown safety feature of the MIC5353 regulator to kick in. To avoid this, reduce the current load of the target section. Target Voltage Setting is Not Reached The maximum output voltage is limited by the USB input voltage (specified to be between 4.4V to 5.25V), and the voltage drop over the MIC5353 regulator at a given voltage setting and current consumption. If a higher output voltage is needed, use a USB power source that can provide a higher input voltage or use an external voltage supply on the VTG pin. © 2020 Microchip Technology Inc. User Guide DS50002971A-page 16 AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Curiosity Nano Target Voltage is Different From Setting This can be caused by an externally applied voltage to the VTG pin, without setting the VOFF pin low. If the target voltage differ more than 100 mV over/under the voltage setting, it will be detected by the on-board debugger, and the internal voltage regulator will be shut down. To fix this issue, remove the applied voltage from the VTG pin, and the on-board debugger will enable the on-board voltage regulator when the new condition is detected. Note that the PS LED will be blinking rapidly if the target voltage is below 100 mV of the setting, but will be lit normally when it is higher than 100 mV above the setting. No, Or Very Low Target Voltage, and PS LED is Blinking Rapidly This can be caused by a full or partial short-circuit and is really a special case of the issue mentioned above. Remove the short-circuit, and the on-board debugger will re-enable the on-board target voltage regulator. No Target Voltage and PS LED is Lit 1 This occurs if the target voltage is set to 0.0V. To fix this, set the target voltage to a value within the specified voltage range for the target device. No Target Voltage and PS LED is Lit 2 This can be the issue if power jumper J100 and/or J101 is cut, and the target voltage regulator is set to a value within the specified voltage range for the target device. To fix this, solder a wire/bridge between the pads for J100/J101, or add a jumper on J101 if a pin header is mounted. VBUS Output Voltage is Low or Not Present This is most lightly caused by a high-current drain on VBUS, and the protection fuse (PTC) will reduce the current or cut off completely. Reduce the current consumption on the VBUS pin to fix this issue. 3.4 Low Power Measurement Power to the AVR128DA48 is connected from the on-board power supply and VTG pin through a 100 mil pin header marked with “POWER” in silkscreen (J101). To measure the power consumption of the AVR128DA48 and other peripherals connected to the board, cut the Target Power strap and connect an ammeter over the strap. To measure the lowest possible power consumption follow these steps: 1. Cut the POWER strap with a sharp tool. 2. Solder a 1x2 100 mil pin header in the footprint. 3. Connect an ammeter to the pin header. 4. Write firmware that. 4.1. Tri-states any I/O connected to the on-board debugger. 4.2. Sets the microcontroller in its lowest power Sleep state. 5. Program the firmware into the AVR128DA48. © 2020 Microchip Technology Inc. User Guide DS50002971A-page 17 AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Curiosity Nano Figure 3-7. Target Power Strap Target Power strap (top side) Tip: A 100-mil pin header can be soldered into the Target Power strap (J101) footprint for easy connection of an ammeter. Once the ammeter is no longer needed, place a jumper cap on the pin header. Info: The on-board level shifters will draw a small amount of current even when they are not in use. A maximum of 2 μA can be drawn from each I/O pin connected to a level shifter for a total of 10 μA. Keep any I/O pin connected to a level shifter are tri-state to prevent leakage. All I/Os connected to the on-board debugger are listed in 4.2.4.1 On-Board Debugger Connections. To prevent any leakage to the on-board level shifters, they can be disconnected completely, as described in 7.4 Disconnecting the On-board Debugger. 3.5 Programming External Microcontrollers The on-board debugger on AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano can be used to program and debug microcontrollers on external hardware. 3.5.1 Supported Devices All external AVR microcontrollers with the UPDI interface can be programmed and debugged with the on-board debugger with Atmel Studio. External SAM microcontrollers that have a Curiosity Nano Board can be programmed and debugged with the on- board debugger with Atmel Studio. AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano can program and debug external AVR128DA48 microcontrollers with MPLAB X IDE. 3.5.2 Software Configuration No software configuration is required to program and debug the same device that is mounted on the board. © 2020 Microchip Technology Inc. User Guide DS50002971A-page 18 AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Curiosity Nano To program and debug a different microcontroller than what is mounted on the board, Atmel Studio must be configured to allow free selection of devices and programming interfaces. 1. Navigate to Tools > Options through the menu system at the top of the application. 2. Select the Tools > Tool settings category in the options window. 3. Set the Hide unsupported devices option to False . Figure 3-8. Hide Unsupported Devices Info: Atmel Studio allows any microcontroller and interface to be selected when Hide unsupported devices is set to False, also microcontrollers and interfaces which are not supported by the on-board debugger. 3.5.3 Hardware Modifications The on-board debugger is connected to the AVR128DA48 by default. These connections must be removed before any external microcontroller can be programmed or debugged. Cut the GPIO straps shown in the figure below with a sharp tool to disconnect the AVR128DA48 from the on-board debugger. © 2020 Microchip Technology Inc. User Guide DS50002971A-page 19 Remember: AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Curiosity Nano Figure 3-9. Programming and Debugging Connections to Debugger GPIO straps (bottom side) Info: Cutting the connections to the debugger will disable programming, debugging, and data streaming from the AVR128DA48 mounted on the board. Tip: Solder in 0Ω resistors across the footprints or short-circuit them with solder to reconnect the signals between the on-board debugger and the AVR128DA48. 3.5.4 Connecting to External Microcontrollers The figure and table below show where the programming and debugging signals must be connected to program and debug external microcontrollers. The on-board debugger can supply power to the external hardware, or use an external voltage as a reference for its level shifters. Read more about the power supply in 3.3 Power Supply. The on-board debugger and level shifters actively drive data and clock signals (DBG0, DBG1, and DBG2) used for programming and debugging, and in most cases, the external resistor on these signals can be ignored. Pull-down resistors are required on the ICSPTM data and clock signals to debug PIC® microcontrollers. DBG3 is an open-drain connection and requires a pull-up resistor to function. AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano has a pull-up resistor R200 connected to its #RESET signal (DBG3). The location of the pull-up resistor is shown in the 7.2 Assembly Drawing in the appendix. • Connect GND and VTG to the external microcontroller • Tie the VOFF pin to GND if the external hardware has its own power supply • Make sure there are pull-down resistors on the ICSP data and clock signals (DBG0 and DBG1) to support the debugging of PIC microcontrollers © 2020 Microchip Technology Inc. User Guide DS50002971A-page 20 AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Curiosity Nano Figure 3-10. Curiosity Nano Standard Pinout USB NCPS LED ID CDC RX DEBUGGER CDC TX DBG1 DBG2 © 2020 Microchip Technology Inc. User Guide DS50002971A-page 21 VBUS VOFF DBG3 DBG0 GND CURIOSITY NANO VTG Table 3-4. Programming and Debugging Interfaces Curiosity Nano Pin UPDI ICSPTM SWD DBG0 UPDI DATA SWDIO DBG1 - CLK SWCLK DBG2 - - - DBG3 - #MCLR #RESET 3.6 Connecting External Debuggers Even though there is an on-board debugger, external debuggers can be connected directly to the AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano to program/debug the AVR128DA48. The on-board debugger keeps all the pins connected to the AVR128DA48 and board edge in tri-state when not actively used. Therefore, the on-board debugger will not interfere with any external debug tools. VBUS AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Curiosity Nano Figure 3-11. Connecting the MPLAB® PICkitTM 4 In-Circuit Debugger/Programmer to AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano 1 = Unused MPLAB® PICkitTM 4 2 = VDD 3 = Ground 4 = PGD 5 = Unused 6 = Unused 7 = Unused 8 = Unused 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 VDD Ground DATAUSB NCPS LED ID VOFF CDC RX DEBUGGER DBG3 CDC TX DBG0 DBG1 GND DBG2 CURIOSITY NANO VTG © 2020 Microchip Technology Inc. User Guide DS50002971A-page 22 AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Curiosity Nano Figure 3-12. Connecting the Atmel-ICE to AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano SAM AVR® Atmel-ICE Ground 1 = Unused 6 = Unused VDD 2 = GND 7 = Unused 3 = UPDI 8 = Unused 210 4 = VTG 9 = Unused 1 95 = Unused 10 = Unused DATA USB NCPS LED ID CDC RX DEBUGGER CDC TX DBG1 DBG2 © 2020 Microchip Technology Inc. User Guide DS50002971A-page 23 VBUS VOFF DBG3 DBG0 GND CURIOSITY NANO VTG CAUTION To programming/debug avoid contention between operation the with external the on-board debugger debugger and the through on-board Atmel debugger, Studio/Microchip do not start MPLABany ® X IDE or mass storage programming while the external tool is active. AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Hardware User Guide 4. Hardware User Guide 4.1 Connectors 4.1.1 AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Pinout All the AVR128DA48 I/O pins are accessible at the edge connectors on the board. The image below shows the board pinout. Figure 4-1. AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Pinout AVR128DA48 Analog Port Debug PWM Curiosity Nano I2C Power SPI Ground USB UART Touch Peripheral Shared pin NCPS LED VBUS ID VOFF PC0 USART1 TX CDC RX DEBUGGER DBG3 PF6 PC1 USART1 RX CDC TX DBG0 UPDI LED0 PC6 DBG1 GND SW0 PC7 DBG2 DEBUGGER VTG PTC XY0 USART0 TX PA0 AVR128DA48 PD7 AIN7 PTC XY23 PTC XY1 USART0 RX PA1 PD6 AIN6 PTC XY22 TWI0 SDA PC2 PD2 AIN2 PTC XY18 TCA0 WO2 TWI0 SCL PC3 PD1 AIN1 PTC XY17 TCA0 WO1 PTC XY4 SPI0 MOSI PA4 PD0 AIN0 PTC XY16 TCA0 WO0 PTC XY5 SPI0 MISO PA5 PD5 AIN5 PTC XY21 PTC XY6 SPI0 SCK PA6 PD4 AIN4 PTC XY20 PTC XY7 SPI0 SS PA7 PD3 AIN3 PTC XY19 AVR128DA48 GND GND PTC XY36 USART2 TX PF4 PE3 PTC XY27 PTC XY37 USART2 RX PF5 PE2 PTC XY26 PTC XY34 PF2 PE1 PTC XY25 PTC XY35 PF3 PE0 PTC XY24 PTC XY8 PB0 PA3 PTC XY3 PTC XY9 PB1 PA2 PTC XY2 PTC XY10 PB2 PB5 PTC XY13 PTC XY11 PB3 PB4 PTC XY12 GND GND CDC RX USART1 TX PC0 PC5 CDC TX USART1 RX PC1 PC4 LED0 PC6 LED0 (PF1) (PTC XY33) XTAL32K2 SW0 PC7 SW0 (PF0) (PTC XY32) XTAL32K1 4.1.2 Using Pin Headers The edge connector footprint on AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano has a staggered design where each hole is shifted 8 mil (~0.2 mm) off-center. The hole shift allows the use of regular 100 mil pin headers on the board without soldering. Once the pin headers are firmly in place, they can be used in normal applications like pin sockets and prototyping boards without any issues. Tip: Start at one end of the pin header and gradually insert the header along the length of the board. Once all the pins are in place, use a flat surface to push them in. Tip: For applications where the pin headers will be used permanently, it is still recommended to solder them in place. © 2020 Microchip Technology Inc. User Guide DS50002971A-page 24 AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Hardware User Guide Important: Once the pin headers are in place, they are hard to remove by hand. Use a set of pliers and carefully remove the pin headers to avoid damage to the pin headers and PCB. 4.2 Peripherals 4.2.1 LED There is one yellow user LED available on the AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Board that can be controlled by either GPIO or PWM. The LED can be activated by driving the connected I/O line to GND. Table 4-1. LED Connection AVR128DA48 Pin Function Shared Functionality PC6 Yellow LED0 Edge connector, On-board debugger 4.2.2 Mechanical Switch The AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano has one mechanical switch. This is a generic user-configurable switch. When the switch is pressed, it will drive the I/O line to ground (GND). Tip: There is no externally connected pull-up resistor on the switch. To use the switch, make sure that an internal pull-up resistor is enabled on pin PC7. Table 4-2. Mechanical Switch AVR128DA48 Pin Description Shared Functionality PC7 User switch (SW0) Edge connector, On-board debugger 4.2.3 Crystal The AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano board has a 32.768 kHz crystal mounted. The AVR128DA48 is connected to the crystal by default, but the GPIOs are also routed to the edge connector through two solder points. The two I/O lines routed to the edge connector are disconnected by default to reduce the chance of an external signal causing contention with the crystal, and to remove excessive capacitance on the lines. To use PF0 and PF1 as GPIO, some hardware modifications are required. • Disconnect the crystal by cutting the two straps on the top side of the board next to the crystal (J210, J211). The crystal should be disconnected when using the pin as GPIO, as this might harm the crystal. • Connect the I/O lines to the edge connector by placing solder blobs on the circular solder points marked PF0 and PF1 on the bottom side of the board (J207, J208) The cut straps and solder points can be seen in Figure 4-2. Table 4-3. Crystal Connections AVR128DA48 Pin Function Shared Functionality PF0 TOSC1 (Crystal input) Edge connector PF1 TOSC2 (Crystal output) Edge connector © 2020 Microchip Technology Inc. User Guide DS50002971A-page 25 AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Hardware User Guide Figure 4-2. Crystal Connection and Cut Straps 4.2.4 On-Board Debugger Implementation AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano features an on-board debugger that can be used to program and debug the AVR128DA48 using UPDI. The on-board debugger also includes a virtual serial port (CDC) interface over UART and debug GPIO. Atmel Studio/Microchip MPLAB® X IDE can be used as a front-end for the on-board debugger for programming and debugging. MPLAB Data Visualizer can be used as a front-end for the CDC and debug GPIO. 4.2.4.1 On-Board Debugger Connections The table below shows the connections between the target and the debugger section. All connections between the target and the debugger are tri-stated as long as the debugger is not actively using the interface. Hence, since there are little contaminations of the signals, the pins can be configured to anything the user wants. For further information on how to use the capabilities of the on-board debugger, see 3.1 On-Board Debugger Overview. Table 4-4. On-Board Debugger Connections

AVR128DA48 Pin Debugger Pin Function Shared Functionality

© 2020 Microchip Technology Inc. User Guide DS50002971A-page 26 RF1 CDC TX UART RX (AVR128DA48 RX line) Edge connector RF0 CDC RX UART TX (AVR128DA48 TX line) Edge connector UPDI DBG0 UPDI Edge connector PC6 DBG1 GPIO1 Edge connector, LED PC7 DBG2 GPIO0 Edge connector, Mechanical Switch PF6 DBG3 RESET Edge connector AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Hardware Revision History and Known Issues 5. Hardware Revision History and Known Issues This user guide is written to provide information about the latest available revision of the board. The following sections contain information about known issues, a revision history of older revisions, and how older revisions differ from the latest revision. 5.1 Identifying Product ID and Revision The revision and product identifier of the AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Board can be found in two ways: Either by utilizing the Atmel Studio/Microchip MPLAB® X IDE Kit Window or by looking at the sticker on the bottom side of the PCB. By connecting AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano to a computer with Atmel Studio/Microchip MPLAB® X IDE running, the Kit Window will pop up. The first six digits of the serial number, which is listed under kit information, contain the product identifier and revision. Tip: The Kit Window can be opened in MPLAB® X IDE through the menu bar Window > Kit Window. The same information can be found on the sticker on the bottom side of the PCB. Most boards will have the identifier and revision printed in plain text as A09-nnnn\rr, where “nnnn” is the identifier, and “rr” is the revision. Boards with limited space have a sticker with only a data matrix code, containing the product identifier, revision, and serial number. The serial number string has the following format: "nnnnrrssssssssss" n = product identifier r = revision s = serial number The product identifier for AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano is A09-3280. 5.2 Revision 3 Revision 3 is the initially released revision. There are no known issues with this revision. © 2020 Microchip Technology Inc. User Guide DS50002971A-page 27 AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Document Revision History 6. Document Revision History Doc. rev. Date Comment A 03/2020 Initial document release. © 2020 Microchip Technology Inc. User Guide DS50002971A-page 28 AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Appendix 7. Appendix 7.1 Schematic Figure 7-1. AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Schematic 47k R200 DBG0 DBG3 VOFF ID_SYS CDC_RX CDC_TX DBG1 DBG2 PF1_TOSC2 J211 XOUT PF3 37 PF4_UART2_TX 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 PA2 46 47 48 PF3 PF4 PF5 PF6 UPDI VDD GND EXTCLK/PA0 PA1 PA2 PA3 PA4 PD4 PC3 13 PF0_TOSC1 J210 XIN © 2020 Microchip Technology Inc. User Guide DS50002971A-page 29 PD3 24 23 PD4_AIN4 PD3_AIN3 PF5_UART2_RX PF6_RESET UPDI PA3 PD2 PD1 PD0 22 PD2_AIN2_WO2 21 PD1_AIN1_WO1 PC7 PC6 20 PD0_AIN0_WO0 19 PC7_SW0_GPIO0 PA0_UART0_TX PA1_UART0_RX PC5 PC4 18 PC6_LED0_GPIO1 17 PC5 GND VDD 16 15 14 PC4 PA4_SPI0_MOSI PC3_I2C0_SCL PC6_LED0_GPIO1 SML-D12Y1WT86LED YELLOW 2 1 1k R203 D200 PC7_SW0_GPIO0 1k R202 4 2 31 TS604VM1-035CR AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Appendix 1k R112 EP 7 GND 3 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 PA27 SRST RESETN PA28 GND VDDCORE VDDIN SWDCLK/PA30 SWDIO/PA31 PA15 PA14 PA11 16 DBG1_CTRL 15 DBG0_CTRL PA10 PA09 REG_ENABLE DBG2_CTRL VTG_EN 7 47k R103 VBUS_ADC 47k R109 © 2020 Microchip Technology Inc. User Guide DS50002971A-page 30 14 VBUS_ADC 13 PA08 GND VDDANA 12 11 10 9 DBG2_GPIO 3 2 47k R111 47k 47k R102 R105 47k 27k R101 R104 REG_ADJUST 47k R100 PAXC20002 AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Appendix 7.2 Assembly Drawing Figure 7-2. AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Assembly Drawing Top PAJ200056 PAJ20000 COJ200 PAJ200055 PAJ200054 PAJ200053 PAJ200052 PAJ200051 PAJ200050 PAJ200049 PAJ200048 PAJ200047 PAJ200046 PAJ200045 PAJ200044 PAJ200043 PAJ200042 PAJ200041 PAJ200040 PAJ200039 PAJ200038 PAJ200037 PAJ200036 PAJ200035 PAJ200034 PAJ200033 PAJ200032 PAJ200031 PAJ200030 PAJ200029 PAJ10500 PAJ10506 PAF10001 COF100 PAC10002 COC100 PAC10001 PAU10103 PAU10107 PAU10104 COU101 PAU10100 PAU10102 PAU10105 PAJ10201 PAJ10202 PAU10101 PAU10106 COC101 PAC10102 PAC10101 PAC10201 COC102 PAC10202 PAF10002 PAR11001 COR110 PAR11002 PAQ10103 COQ101 PAQ10102 PAQ10100 PAR11301 COR113 PAR11302 COR100 PAR10002 PAR10001 COR109 PAR10902 COR103 PAU10201 COU102 PAU10202 PAU10203 PAR10301 PAU10207 PAR10302 PAU10206 PAU10205 PAU10204 COR101 PAR10102 PAR10101 COR104 PAR10402 PAR10401 PAC10301 COC103 PAC10302 PAR10601 COR106 PAU1080C2 PAU1080B2 PAU1080A2 COU108 PAR10602 PAU1080C1 PAU1080B1 PAU1080A1 PAJ10001 COJ100 PAJ10002 COJ105 PAJ10507 COR105 PAR10502 PAR10501 COC205 PAC20501 PAC20502 PAJ10101 COJ101 PAJ10102 PAJ105010 PAJ10508 PAQ10101 PAR10901 PAR11102 COR111 PAR11101 COC108 PAC10802 PAR10701 COR107 PAR10702 COC106 PAC10601 PAC10602 PAC10701 COC107 PAC10702 PAJ20001 PAJ20002 PAJ20003 PAJ20004 PAJ20201 COJ202 PAJ20202 PAR10201 COR102 PAR10202 PAJ20101 COJ201 PAJ20102 PAJ20005 PAJ20006 PAJ20007 PAJ20008 PAJ20009 b PAJ200010 PAXC20002 COXC20 COJ209 PAJ20902 PAJ20901 COC203 PAC20302 PAC20301 COC204 PAC20402 PAC20401 PAJ21002 COJ210 PAJ21001 COU107 PAU10701 PAU10702 PAU10703 PAU10700 PAU10706 PAU10705 PAU10704 PAJ20601 COJ206 PAJ20501 COJ205 PAJ20602 PAJ20502 PAJ21102 COJ211 PAJ21101 PAJ105011 PAJ20401 COJ204 PAJ20402 COTP100 PATP10001 PAJ20301 COJ203 PAJ20302 PAXC20001 PAL20001 COL200 PAU200036 PAU200035 COJ208 PAL20002 PAU200034 PAJ20805 PAJ20801 COJ207 PAU200033 COC201 PAC20101 PAU200032 PAJ20705 PAJ20701 PAU200031 PAJ20802 PAC20102 PAU200030 PAJ20702 PAU200029 PAU200028 PAU200027 PAU200026 PAU200025 PAU200024 PAU200023 PAU200022 PAU200021 PAU200020 PAU200019 PAU200018 PAU200017 PAU200016 PAU200015 PAU200014 PAU200013 COC200 PAC20001 PAC20002 COR200 PAR20002 PAU200037 PAR20001 PAU200038 PAU200039 COC202 PAC20201 PAU200040 PAU200041 PAC20202 PAU200042 PAU200043 PAU200044 PAU200045 PAU200046 PAU200047 PAU200048 PAU20001 PAU20002 PAU20003 PAU20004 PAU20005 PAU20006 PAU20007 PAU20008 PAU20009 PAU200010 PAU200011 PAU200012 C COLABEL1 PASW20003 PASW20001 COJ102 PAJ10501 PAJ10203 PAJ10502 PAJ10503 PAJ10204 PAJ10205 PAJ10206 COTP101 PAU100017 PATP10101 PAU100016 PAU100033 PAU100015 PAU100014 COU100 PAU100013 PAU100012 PAU100011 PAU100010 PAU109 PAU10008 PAC10801 COR108 PAR10802 PAR10801 COU106 PAU10601 PAU10602 PAU10603 PAU10600 PAU10606 PAU10605 PAU10604 PAJ10504 COU200 COD200 PAD20001 PAD20002 COR203 PAR20302 PAR20301 COR202 PAR20202 PAR20201 PASW204 COSW20 PAU100018 PAJ10505 PAJ10509 PAU100019 PAU100020 PAU10007 PAU10006 PAU10005 COU105 PAU10501 PAU10502 PAU10503 PAU10500 PAU10506 PAU10505 PAU10504 PAU100021 PAU10004 PAU100022 PAU10003 PAU100023 PAU10002 PAU100024 PAU10001 PAU100025 PAU100026 PAU100027 PAU100028 PAU100029 PAU100030 PAU100031 PAU100032 PAD10002 COD100 PAD10001 PAR11201 COR112 PAR11202 COU104 PAU10401 PAU10402 PAU10403 PAU10400 PAU10406 PAU10405 PAU10404 COU103 PAU10301 PAU10302 PAU10303 PAU10306 PAU10300 PAU10305 PAU10304 PASW202 PAJ200011 PAJ200012 PAJ200013 PAJ200014 PAJ200015 PAJ200016 PAJ200017 PAJ200018 PAJ200019 PAJ200020 PAJ200021 PAJ200022 PAJ200023 PAJ200024 PAJ200025 PAJ200026 PAJ200027 PAJ2028 Figure 7-3. AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Assembly Drawing Bottom PASW20001 COSW20 PASW20003 PAJ200029 PAJ200030 COLABEL1 PAJ200031 PAJ200032 PAJ200033 PAJ200034 PAJ200035 PAJ200036 PAJ200037 PAJ200038 PAJ200039 PAJ200040 PAJ200041 PAJ200042 PAJ200043 COXC20 PAJ200044 PAJ200045 R PAJ200046 PAJ200047 PAJ200048 PAJ200049 PAJ200050 PAJ200051 PAJ200052 cPAJ200053 t PAJ200054 PAJ200055 PAJ200056 PAJ20000 COJ200 © 2020 Microchip Technology Inc. User Guide DS50002971A-page 31 PAU200013 PAU200014 PAU200015 PAU200016 PAU200017 PAU200018 PAU200019 PAU200020 PAU200021 PAU200022 PAU200023 PAU200024 PAU200025 PAU200026 PAU200027 PAU200028 PAU200029 PAU200030 PAU200031 PAU200032 PAU200033 PAU200034 PAU200035 PAU200036 PAJ10102 COJ101 PAJ10101 COJ100 PAJ10002 PAJ10001 COC102 PAC10202 PAC10201 PAU10204 PAU10207 COC101 PAC10102 PAC10101 PASW202 PASW204 COC201 PAC20102 PAC20101 PAL20002 COL200 PAL20001 COC203 PAC20302 PAC20301 COC204 PAC20402 PAC20401 PAU200012 PAU200011 PAU200010 PAU20009 PAU20008 PAU20007 PAU20006 PAU20005 PAU20004 PAU20003 PAU20002 PAU20001 PAU200048 PAU200047 PAU200046 PAU200045 PAU200044 PAU200043 PAU200042 PAU200041 PAU200040 COC202 PAC20202 PAU200039 PAU200038 PAC20201 PAU200037 COJ210 PAJ21001 PAJ21002 COC205 PAC20501 PAC20502 PAJ21101 COJ211 PAJ21102 COR106 PAR10602 COU108 PAU1080C1 PAU1080B1 PAU1080A1 PAU1080C2 PAU1080B2 PAU1080A2 PAR10601 COR104 PAR10402 PAR10401 COR101 PAR10102 PAR10101 PAU10206 PAU10205 PAR10302 COR103 COU102 PAR10301 PAU10201 PAU10202 PAU10203 PAU10101 PAU10107 PAU10106 COU101 PAU10100 PAU10102 PAU10105 PAU10103 PAU10104 PAC10001 COC100 PAC10002 PAF10001 COF100 COC200 PAC20002 PAC20001 COJ207 PAJ20705 PAJ20702 PAJ20701 COJ208 PAJ20805 PAJ20802 PAJ20801 PAC10302 COC103 PAC10301 COR109 PAR10902 COR100 PAR10002 PAR10001 COR110 PAR11002 PAR11001 COQ101 PAQ10102 PAQ10100 PAQ10103 PAF10002 COR113 PAR11302 PAR11301 PAJ10500 PAJ10506 COJ209 PAJ20901 PAJ20902 PAR11101 COR111 PAR11102 PAJ10201 PAJ10202 COJ105 COR200 PAR20001 PAR20002 PAXC20001 PAJ20202 PAJ20602 COJ202 COJ206 PAJ20201 PAJ20601 PAR10901 PAQ10101 PAJ10508 PAJ105010 COR202 PAR20202 COR203 PAR20302 PAR20301 PAD20001 PAD20002 COD200 COU200 PAJ20502 PAJ20402 COJ205 COJ204 PAJ20501 PAJ20401 PAJ20102 COJ201 PAJ20101 PAJ20302 COJ203 PAJ20301 PAU10700 PAU10706 COU107 PAU10705 PAU10704 PAU10701 PAU10702 PAU10703 PAU10600 PAU10606 COU106 PAU10605 PAU10604 PAU10601 PAU10602 PAU10603 COC108 PAC10802 PAC10801 COR108 PAR10802 PAR10202 COR102 PAR10201 COR105 PAR10502 PAR10501 PAU10008 PAU109 PAU100033 PAU100010 COU100 PAU100011 PAU100012 PAU100013 PAU100014 PAU100015 PAU100016 PAU100017 COTP101 PATP10101 COTP100 PATP10001 PAJ105011 PAJ10507 PAU10306 PAU10305 PAJ2028 PAJ200027 PAJ200026 PAJ200025 PAJ200024 PAJ200023 PAJ200022 PAJ200021 PAJ200020 PAJ200019 PAJ200018 PAJ200017 PAJ200016 PAJ200015 PAJ200014 PAJ200013 PAJ200012 PAJ200011 PAJ200010 PAJ20009 PAJ20008 PAJ20007 PAJ20006 PAU10304 PAJ20005 PAU10303 PAC10702 COC107 PAC10701 PAC10602 COC106 PAC10601 COR107 PAR10702 PAR10701 PAR11202 COR112 PAR11201 COD100 PAD10001 PAD10002 PAJ20004 PAJ20003 PAJ20002 PAJ20001 PAJ10205 PAJ10501 PAJ10203 PAR20201 PAJ10206 PAJ10204 PAU10001 PAJ10502 PAJ10503 COJ102 PAU10500 PAU10506 COU105 PAU10505 PAU10504 PAU10501 PAU10502 PAU10503 PAU10007 PAU100018 PAJ10504 PAR10801 PAU10006 PAU10005 PAU100019 PAU100020 PAU10004 PAU100021 PAU10003 PAU100022 PAJ10505 PAJ10509 PAU10400 PAU10406 COU104 PAU10405 PAU10404 PAU10401 PAU10402 PAU10403 PAU10002 PAU100023 PAU100024 PAU100032 PAU100031 PAU100030 PAU100029 PAU100028 PAU100027 PAU100026 PAU100025 PAU10300 COU103 PAU10301 PAU10302 AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Appendix 7.3 Curiosity Nano Base for Click boardsTM Figure 7-4. AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Pinout Mapping VBUS VOFF DBG3 DBG0 GND VTG PD7 PD6 PD2 PD1 PD0 PD5 PD4 PD3 GND PE3 PE2 PE1 PE0 PA3 PA2 PB5 PB4 GND PC5 PC4 (PF1) (PF0) NC ID CDCRX CDCTX DBG1 DBG2 PA0 PA1 PC2 PC3 PA4 PA5 PA6 PA7 GND PF4 PF5 PF2 PF3 PB0 PB1 PB2 PB3 GND PC0 PC1 PC6 PC7 © 2020 Microchip Technology Inc. User Guide DS50002971A-page 32 AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Appendix 7.4 Disconnecting the On-board Debugger The on-board debugger and level shifters can be completely disconnected from the AVR128DA48. The block diagram below shows all connections between the debugger and the AVR128DA48. The rounded boxes represent connections to the board edge. The signal names shown are also printed in silkscreen on the bottom side of the board. To disconnect the debugger, cut the straps shown in Figure 7-6. Attention: Cutting the GPIO straps to the on-board debugger will disable the virtual serial port, programming, debugging, and data streaming. Cutting the power supply strap will disconnect the on-board power supply. Tip: Any connection that is cut can be reconnected using solder, alternatively, a 0Ω 0402 resistor can be mounted. Tip: When the debugger is disconnected, an external debugger can be connected to holes shown in Figure 7-6. Details about connecting an external debugger are described in 3.6 Connecting External Debuggers. Figure 7-5. On-Board Debugger Connections Block Diagram VBUS VOFF VTG USB VBUS LDO Power Supply strap Target Power strap VCC_EDGE LDO VCC_P3V3 PA04/PA06 DBG0 GPIO straps PA07 DBG1 PA08 DBG2 PA16 Level-Shift DBG3 TARGET PA00 CDC TX UART RX PA01 CDC RX UART TX DIR x 5CDC RX DBG0 CDC TX DBG1 DBG2 DBG3 © 2020 Microchip Technology Inc. User Guide DS50002971A-page 33 AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Appendix Figure 7-6. On-Board Debugger Connection Cut Straps GPIO straps (bottom side) Power Supply strap (top side) 7.5 Getting Started with IAR IAR Embedded Workbench® for AVR® is a proprietary high-efficiency compiler not based on GCC. Programming and debugging of AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano is supported in IARTM Embedded Workbench for AVR using the Atmel-ICE interface. Some initial settings must be set up in the project to get the programming and debugging to work. The following steps will explain how to get your project ready for programming and debugging: 1. Make sure you have opened the project you want to configure. Open the OPTIONS dialog for the project. 2. In the category General Options, select the Target tab. Select the device for the project, or if not listed, the core of the device, as shown in Figure 7-7. 3. In the category Debugger, select the Setup tab. Select Atmel-ICE as the driver, as shown in Figure 7-8. 4. In the category Debugger > Atmel-ICE, select the Atmel-ICE 1 tab. Select UPDI as the interface and, optionally, select the UPDI frequency, as shown in Figure 7-9. Info: If the selection of Debug Port (mentioned in step 4) is grayed out, the interface is preselected, and the user can skip this configuration step. © 2020 Microchip Technology Inc. User Guide DS50002971A-page 34 AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Appendix Figure 7-7. Select Target Device Figure 7-8. Select Debugger © 2020 Microchip Technology Inc. User Guide DS50002971A-page 35 AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano Appendix Figure 7-9. Configure Interface © 2020 Microchip Technology Inc. User Guide DS50002971A-page 36 AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano The Microchip Website Microchip provides online support via our website at http://www.microchip.com/. This website is used to make files and information easily available to customers. Some of the content available includes: • Product Support – Data sheets and errata, application notes and sample programs, design resources, user’s guides and hardware support documents, latest software releases and archived software • General Technical Support – Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs), technical support requests, online discussion groups, Microchip design partner program member listing • Business of Microchip – Product selector and ordering guides, latest Microchip press releases, listing of seminars and events, listings of Microchip sales offices, distributors and factory representatives Product Change Notification Service Microchip’s product change notification service helps keep customers current on Microchip products. Subscribers will receive email notification whenever there are changes, updates, revisions or errata related to a specified product family or development tool of interest. To register, go to http://www.microchip.com/pcn and follow the registration instructions. Customer Support Users of Microchip products can receive assistance through several channels: • Distributor or Representative • Local Sales Office • Embedded Solutions Engineer (ESE) • Technical Support Customers should contact their distributor, representative or ESE for support. Local sales offices are also available to help customers. A listing of sales offices and locations is included in this document. Technical support is available through the website at: http://www.microchip.com/support Microchip Devices Code Protection Feature Note the following details of the code protection feature on Microchip devices: • Microchip products meet the specification contained in their particular Microchip Data Sheet. • Microchip believes that its family of products is one of the most secure families of its kind on the market today, when used in the intended manner and under normal conditions. • There are dishonest and possibly illegal methods used to breach the code protection feature. All of these methods, to our knowledge, require using the Microchip products in a manner outside the operating specifications contained in Microchip’s Data Sheets. Most likely, the person doing so is engaged in theft of intellectual property. • Microchip is willing to work with the customer who is concerned about the integrity of their code. • Neither Microchip nor any other semiconductor manufacturer can guarantee the security of their code. Code protection does not mean that we are guaranteeing the product as “unbreakable.” Code protection is constantly evolving. We at Microchip are committed to continuously improving the code protection features of our products. Attempts to break Microchip’s code protection feature may be a violation of the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. If such acts allow unauthorized access to your software or other copyrighted work, you may have a right to sue for relief under that Act. Legal Notice Information contained in this publication regarding device applications and the like is provided only for your convenience and may be superseded by updates. It is your responsibility to ensure that your application meets with © 2020 Microchip Technology Inc. User Guide DS50002971A-page 37 AVR128DA48 Curiosity Nano your specifications. MICROCHIP MAKES NO REPRESENTATIONS OR WARRANTIES OF ANY KIND WHETHER EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, WRITTEN OR ORAL, STATUTORY OR OTHERWISE, RELATED TO THE INFORMATION, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO ITS CONDITION, QUALITY, PERFORMANCE, MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR PURPOSE. Microchip disclaims all liability arising from this information and its use. Use of Microchip devices in life support and/or safety applications is entirely at the buyer’s risk, and the buyer agrees to defend, indemnify and hold harmless Microchip from any and all damages, claims, suits, or expenses resulting from such use. No licenses are conveyed, implicitly or otherwise, under any Microchip intellectual property rights unless otherwise stated. Trademarks The Microchip name and logo, the Microchip logo, Adaptec, AnyRate, AVR, AVR logo, AVR Freaks, BesTime, BitCloud, chipKIT, chipKIT logo, CryptoMemory, CryptoRF, dsPIC, FlashFlex, flexPWR, HELDO, IGLOO, JukeBlox, KeeLoq, Kleer, LANCheck, LinkMD, maXStylus, maXTouch, MediaLB, megaAVR, Microsemi, Microsemi logo, MOST, MOST logo, MPLAB, OptoLyzer, PackeTime, PIC, picoPower, PICSTART, PIC32 logo, PolarFire, Prochip Designer, QTouch, SAM-BA, SenGenuity, SpyNIC, SST, SST Logo, SuperFlash, Symmetricom, SyncServer, Tachyon, TempTrackr, TimeSource, tinyAVR, UNI/O, Vectron, and XMEGA are registered trademarks of Microchip Technology Incorporated in the U.S.A. and other countries. APT, ClockWorks, The Embedded Control Solutions Company, EtherSynch, FlashTec, Hyper Speed Control, HyperLight Load, IntelliMOS, Libero, motorBench, mTouch, Powermite 3, Precision Edge, ProASIC, ProASIC Plus, ProASIC Plus logo, Quiet-Wire, SmartFusion, SyncWorld, Temux, TimeCesium, TimeHub, TimePictra, TimeProvider, Vite, WinPath, and ZL are registered trademarks of Microchip Technology Incorporated in the U.S.A. Adjacent Key Suppression, AKS, Analog-for-the-Digital Age, Any Capacitor, AnyIn, AnyOut, BlueSky, BodyCom, CodeGuard, CryptoAuthentication, CryptoAutomotive, CryptoCompanion, CryptoController, dsPICDEM, dsPICDEM.net, Dynamic Average Matching, DAM, ECAN, EtherGREEN, In-Circuit Serial Programming, ICSP, INICnet, Inter-Chip Connectivity, JitterBlocker, KleerNet, KleerNet logo, memBrain, Mindi, MiWi, MPASM, MPF, MPLAB Certified logo, MPLIB, MPLINK, MultiTRAK, NetDetach, Omniscient Code Generation, PICDEM, PICDEM.net, PICkit, PICtail, PowerSmart, PureSilicon, QMatrix, REAL ICE, Ripple Blocker, SAM-ICE, Serial Quad I/O, SMART-I.S., SQI, SuperSwitcher, SuperSwitcher II, Total Endurance, TSHARC, USBCheck, VariSense, ViewSpan, WiperLock, Wireless DNA, and ZENA are trademarks of Microchip Technology Incorporated in the U.S.A. and other countries. SQTP is a service mark of Microchip Technology Incorporated in the U.S.A. The Adaptec logo, Frequency on Demand, Silicon Storage Technology, and Symmcom are registered trademarks of Microchip Technology Inc. in other countries. GestIC is a registered trademark of Microchip Technology Germany II GmbH & Co. KG, a subsidiary of Microchip Technology Inc., in other countries. All other trademarks mentioned herein are property of their respective companies. © 2020, Microchip Technology Incorporated, Printed in the U.S.A., All Rights Reserved. ISBN: 978-1-5224-5760-2 Quality Management System For information regarding Microchip’s Quality Management Systems, please visit http://www.microchip.com/quality. © 2020 Microchip Technology Inc. User Guide DS50002971A-page 38 Worldwide Sales and Service AMERICAS ASIA/PACIFIC ASIA/PACIFIC EUROPE

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