HP PROCURVE 2524 J4813A (01) PDF MANUAL


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PDF Content Summary: management and configuration guide hp.com/go/procurve hp procurve series 2500 switches

HP ProCurve Switches 2512 and 2524 Software Release F.01or Greater Management and Configuration Guide

© Copyright 2000 Hewlett-Packard Company All Rights Reserved. This document contains information which is protected by copyright. Reproduction, adaptation, or translation without prior permission is prohibited, except as allowed under the copyright laws. Publication Number 5969-2354 August 2000 Applicable Product HP ProCurve Switch 2512 (J4812A) HP ProCurve Switch 2524 (J4813A) Trademark Credits Microsoft, Windows, Windows 95, and Microsoft Windows NT are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. Internet Explorer is a trademark of Microsoft Corporation. Ethernet is a registered trademark of Xerox Corporation. Netscape is a registered trademark of Netscape Corporation. Disclaimer The information contained in this document is subject to change without notice. HEWLETT-PACKARD COMPANY MAKES NO WARRANTY OF ANY KIND WITH REGARD TO THIS MATERIAL, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. Hewlett-Packard shall not be liable for errors contained herein or for incidental or consequential damages in connection with the furnishing, performance, or use of this material. Hewlett-Packard assumes no responsibility for the use or reliability of its software on equipment that is not furnished by Hewlett-Packard. Warranty See the Customer Support/Warranty booklet included with the product. A copy of the specific warranty terms applicable to your Hewlett-Packard products and replacement parts can be obtained from your HP Sales and Service Office or authorized dealer.

Hewlett-Packard Company 8000 Foothills Boulevard, m/s 5551 Roseville, California 95747-5551 hp.com/go/procurve Preface Preface Use of This Guide and Other ProCurve Switch Documentation This guide describes how to use the command line interface (CLI), menu interface, and web browser interface for the HP ProCurve Switches 2512 and 2524 - hereafter referred to individually as the “Switch 2512” or “Switch 2524” and collectively as the “Switches 2512/2524” or “Series 2500 switches”). ■ If you need information on specific parameters in the menu interface, refer to the online help provided in the interface. ■ If you need information on a specific command in the CLI, type the command name followed by “help” (<command> help). ■ If you need information on specific features in the HP Web Browser Interface (hereafter referred to as the “web browser interface”), use the online help available for the web browser interface. For more information on web browser Help options, refer to “Online Help for the HP Web Browser Interface” on page 4-12. ■ If you need further information on Hewlett-Packard switch technology, refer to HP’s ProCurve Networking website at: hp.com/go/procurve iii Contents Contents Preface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii Use of This Guide and Other ProCurve Switch Documentation . . . . . . iii 1: Selecting a Management Interface Chapter Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2 Understanding Management Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2 Advantages of Using the Menu Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3 Advantages of Using the CLI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4 CLI Usage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4 Advantages of Using the HP Web Browser Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5 Advantages of Using HP TopTools for Hubs & Switches . . . . . . . . . 1-6 2. Using the Menu Interface Chapter Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2 Starting and Ending a Menu Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3 How To Start a Menu Interface Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4 How To End a Menu Session and Exit from the Console: . . . . . . . . . . 2-5 Main Menu Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7 Screen Structure and Navigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-9 Rebooting the Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-12 Menu Features List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-14 Where To Go From Here . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-15 3. Using the Command Line Interface (CLI) Chapter Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2 v Contents Accessing the CLI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2 Using the CLI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2 Privilege Levels at Logon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3 Privilege Level Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4 Operator Privileges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4 Manager Privileges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-5 How To Move Between Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7 Listing Commands and Command Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8 Listing Commands Available at Any Privilege Level . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8 Command Option Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-10 Displaying CLI "Help" . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-11 Configuration Commands and the Context Configuration Modes . . 3-13 CLI Control and Editing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-16 4. Using the HP Web Browser Interface Chapter Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2 General Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-3 Web Browser Interface Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4 Starting an HP Web Browser Interface Session with the Switch . . 4-5 Using a Standalone Web Browser in a PC or UNIX Workstation . . . . 4-5 Using HP TopTools for Hubs & Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6 Tasks for Your First HP Web Browser Interface Session . . . . . . . . . 4-8 Viewing the “First Time Install” Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-8 Creating Usernames and Passwords in the Browser Interface . . . . . . 4-9 Using the Passwords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-11 Using the User Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-11 If You Lose a Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-11 Online Help for the HP Web Browser Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-12 Support/Mgmt URLs Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-13 Support URL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-14 Help and the Management Server URL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-14 Status Reporting Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-16 The Overview Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-16 vi Contents The Port Utilization and Status Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-17 Port Utilization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-17 Port Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-19 The Alert Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-20 Sorting the Alert Log Entries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-20 Alert Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-21 Viewing Detail Views of Alert Log Entries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-22 The Status Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-23 Setting Fault Detection Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-24 5. Configuring IP Addressing, Interface Access, and System Information Chapter Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2 IP Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-3 Just Want a Quick Start? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4 IP Addressing with Multiple VLANs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4 IP Addressing in a Stacking Environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5 Menu: Configuring IP Address, Gateway, Time-To-Live (TTL), and Timep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-5 CLI: Configuring IP Address, Gateway, Time-To-Live (TTL), and Timep . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-7 Web: Configuring IP Addressing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-10 How IP Addressing Affects Switch Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-10 DHCP/Bootp Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-11 Network Preparations for Configuring DHCP/Bootp . . . . . . . . . 5-14 Globally Assigned IP Network Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-15 Interface Access: Console/Serial Link, Web, and Inbound Telnet 5-16 Menu: Modifying the Interface Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-17 CLI: Modifying the Interface Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-18 System Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-21 Menu: Viewing and Configuring System Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-22 CLI: Viewing and Configuring System Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-23 Web: Configuring System Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-25 vii Contents 6. Optimizing Port Usage Through Traffic Control and Port Trunking Chapter Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2 Viewing Port Status and Configuring Port Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2 Menu: Viewing Port Status and Configuring Port Parameters . . . . . . 6-5 CLI: Viewing Port Status and Configuring Port Parameters . . . . . . . . 6-6 Web: Viewing Port Status and Configuring Port Parameters . . . . . . . 6-9 Port Trunking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-10 Switch 2512 and 2524 Port Trunk Features and Operation . . . . . . . . 6-11 Trunk Configuration Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-12 Menu: Viewing and Configuring a Static Trunk Group . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-16 Check the Event Log (page 11-11) to verify that the trunked ports are operating properly. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-18 CLI: Viewing and Configuring a Static or Dynamic Port Trunk Group . . 6-18 Using the CLI To View Port Trunks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-18 Using the CLI To Configure a Static or Dynamic Trunk Group . 6-20 Web: Viewing Existing Port Trunk Groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-23 Trunk Group Operation Using LACP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-24 Default Port Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-25 LACP Notes and Restrictions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-26 Trunk Group Operation Using the “Trunk” Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-27 Trunk Operation Using the “FEC” Option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-27 How the Switch Lists Trunk Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-28 Outbound Traffic Distribution Across Trunked Links . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-28 7: Using Passwords, Port Security, and Authorized IP Managers To Protect Against Unauthorized Access Chapter Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-3 Using Password Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-4 Menu: Setting Manager and Operator passwords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-5 CLI: Setting Manager and Operator Passwords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-7 Web: Configuring User Names and Passwords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-8 viii Contents Configuring and Monitoring Port Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-9 Basic Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-9 Blocking Unauthorized Traffic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-10 Trunk Group Exclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-11 Planning Port Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-11 CLI: Port Security Command Options and Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-13 CLI: Displaying Current Port Security Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-16 CLI: Configuring Port Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-17 Web: Displaying and Configuring Port Security Features . . . . . . . . . 7-21 Reading Intrusion Alerts and Resetting Alert Flags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-22 Notice of Security Violations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-22 How the Intrusion Log Operates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-22 Keeping the Intrusion Log Current by Resetting Alert Flags . . . 7-23 Menu: Checking for Intrusions, Listing Intrusion Alerts, and Resetting Alert Flags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-24 CLI: Checking for Intrusions, Listing Intrusion Alerts, and Resetting Alert Flags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-25 Using the Event Log To Find Intrusion Alerts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-27 Web: Checking for Intrusions, Listing Intrusion Alerts, and Resetting Alert Flags . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-28 Operating Notes for Port Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-28 Using IP Authorized Managers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-30 Access Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-31 Defining Authorized Management Stations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-31 Overview of IP Mask Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-32 Menu: Viewing and Configuring IP Authorized Managers . . . . . . . . . 7-33 CLI: Viewing and Configuring Authorized IP Managers . . . . . . . . . . . 7-34 Listing the Switch’s Current Authorized IP Manager(s) . . . . . . . 7-34 Configuring IP Authorized Managers for the Switch . . . . . . . . . . 7-35 Web: Configuring IP Authorized Managers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-36 Building IP Masks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-36 Configuring One Station Per Authorized Manager IP Entry . . . . 7-36 Configuring Multiple Stations Per Authorized Manager IP Entry 7-37 Additional Examples for Authorizing Multiple Stations . . . . . . . 7-39 Operating and Troubleshooting Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-39 8: Configuring for Network Management Applications Chapter Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2 ix Contents SNMP Management Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-3 Configuring for SNMP Access to the Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-4 SNMP Communities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-6 Menu: Viewing and Configuring SNMP Communities . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-6 To View, Edit, or Add SNMP Communities: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-6 CLI: Viewing and Configuring Community Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-8 Listing Current Community Names and Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-8 Configuring Identity Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-9 Configuring Community Names and Values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-9 Trap Receivers and Authentication Traps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-10 CLI: Configuring and Displaying Trap Receivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-11 Using the CLI To List Current SNMP Trap Receivers . . . . . . . . . 8-11 Configuring Trap Receivers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-12 Using the CLI To Enable Authentication Traps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-12 Advanced Management: RMON and HP Extended RMON Support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-13 RMON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-13 Extended RMON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-13 9: Configuring Advanced Features Chapter Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-4 HP ProCurve Stack Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-5 Which Devices Support Stacking? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-6 Components of HP ProCurve Stack Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-7 General Stacking Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-7 Operating Rules for Stacking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-8 General Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-8 Specific Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-9 Overview of Configuring and Bringing Up a Stack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-11 General Steps for Creating a Stack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-13 Using the Menu Interface To View Stack Status And Configure Stacking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-15 Using the Menu Interface To View and Configure a Commander Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-15 Using the Menu To Manage a Candidate Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-17 x Contents Using the Commander To Manage The Stack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-19 Using the Commander To Access Member Switches for Configuration Changes and Monitoring Traffic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-26 Converting a Commander or Member to a Member of Another Stack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-27 Monitoring Stack Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-28 Using the CLI To View Stack Status and Configure Stacking . . . . . . 9-32 Using the CLI To View Stack Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-34 Using the CLI To Configure a Commander Switch . . . . . . . . . . . 9-36 Adding to a Stack or Moving Switches Between Stacks . . . . . . . 9-38 Using the CLI To Remove a Member from a Stack . . . . . . . . . . . 9-43 Using the CLI To Access Member Switches for Configuration Changes and Traffic Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-45 SNMP Community Operation in a Stack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-46 Using the CLI To Disable or Re-Enable Stacking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-47 Transmission Interval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-47 Stacking Operation with Multiple VLANs Configured . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-47 Web: Viewing and Configuring Stacking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-48 Status Messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-49 Port-Based Virtual LANs (Static VLANs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-50 Overview of Using VLANs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-53 VLAN Support and the Default VLAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-53 Which VLAN Is Primary? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-53 Per-Port Static VLAN Configuration Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-54 General Steps for Using VLANs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-56 Notes on Using VLANs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-56 Menu: Configuring VLAN Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-57 To Change VLAN Support Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-57 Adding or Editing VLAN Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-59 Adding or Changing a VLAN Port Assignment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-60 CLI: Configuring VLAN Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-62 Web: Viewing and Configuring VLAN Parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-68 VLAN Tagging Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-69 Effect of VLANs on Other Switch Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-73 Spanning Tree Protocol Operation with VLANs . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-73 IP Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-73 VLAN MAC Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-74 Port Trunks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-74 Port Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-74 xi Contents VLAN Restrictions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-75 Symptoms of Duplicate MAC Addresses in VLAN Environments 9-76 GVRP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-77 General Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-78 Per-Port Options for Handling GVRP “Unknown VLANs” . . . . . . . . . 9-80 Per-Port Options for Dynamic VLAN Advertising and Joining . . . . . 9-82 GVRP and VLAN Access Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-83 Port-Leave From a Dynamic VLAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-83 Planning for GVRP Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-84 Configuring GVRP On a Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-84 Menu: Viewing and Configuring GVRP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-84 CLI: Viewing and Configuring GVRP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-86 Web: Viewing and Configuring GVRP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-89 GVRP Operating Notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-89 Multimedia Traffic Control with IP Multicast (IGMP) . . . . . . . . . . 9-91 IGMP Operating Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-92 CLI: Configuring and Displaying IGMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-93 Web: Enabling or Disabling IGMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-97 How IGMP Operates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-97 Role of the Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-98 Number of IP Multicast Addresses Allowed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-101 Interaction with Multicast Traffic/Security Filters. . . . . . . . . . . 9-101 Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-102 Menu: Configuring STP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-103 CLI: Configuring STP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-105 Web: Enabling or Disabling STP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-108 How STP Operates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-108 STP Fast Mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-109 STP Operation with 802.1Q VLANs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9-110 10: Monitoring and Analyzing Switch Operation Chapter Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-2 Status and Counters Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-3 Menu Access To Status and Counters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-4 xii Contents General System Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-5 Menu Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-5 CLI Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-5 Switch Management Address Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-6 Menu Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-6 CLI Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-6 Port Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-7 Menu: Displaying Port Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-7 CLI Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-7 Web Access . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-7 Viewing Port and Trunk Group Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-8 Menu Access to Port and Trunk Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-9 CLI Access To Port and Trunk Group Statistics . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-10 Web Browser Access To View Port and Trunk Group Statistics 10-10 Viewing the Switch’s MAC Address Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-11 Menu Access to the MAC Address Views and Searches . . . . . . 10-12 CLI Access for MAC Address Views and Searches . . . . . . . . . . 10-14 Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-15 Menu Access to STP Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-15 CLI Access to STP Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-16 Internet Group Management Protocol (IGMP) Status . . . . . . . . . . . 10-17 VLAN Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-18 Web Browser Interface Status Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-20 Port Monitoring Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-21 Menu: Configuring Port Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-22 CLI: Configuring Port Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-24 Web: Configuring Port Monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10-26 11: Troubleshooting Chapter Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-2 Troubleshooting Approaches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-3 Browser or Console Access Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-4 xiii Contents Unusual Network Activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-6 General Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-6 IGMP-Related Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-7 Problems Related to Spanning-Tree Protocol (STP) . . . . . . . . . . 11-8 Stacking-Related Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-8 Timep or Gateway Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-8 VLAN-Related Problems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-9 Using the Event Log To Identify Problem Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-11 Menu: Entering and Navigating in the Event Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-12 CLI: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-13 Diagnostic Tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-14 Ping and Link Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-14 Web: Executing Ping or Link Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-15 CLI: Ping or Link Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-16 Displaying the Configuration File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-18 CLI: Viewing the Configuration File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-18 Web: Viewing the Configuration File . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-18 CLI Administrative and Troubleshooting Commands . . . . . . . . . . . 11-19 Restoring the Factory-Default Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11-20 CLI: Resetting to the Factory-Default Configuration . . . . . . . . 11-20 Clear/Reset: Resetting to the Factory-Default Configuration . 11-20 A: Transferring an Operating System or Startup Configuration File Appendix Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-2 Downloading an Operating System (OS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-2 Using TFTP To Download the OS File from a Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-3 Menu: TFTP Download from a Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-4 CLI: TFTP Download from a Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-5 Using the SNMP-Based Software Update Utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-6 Series 2500 Switch-to-Switch Download . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-6 Menu: Switch-to-Switch Download . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-6 CLI: Switch-To-Switch Download . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-7 Using Xmodem to Download the OS File From a PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-7 Menu: Xmodem Download . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-7 CLI: Xmodem Download from a PC or Unix Workstation . . . . . A-8 Troubleshooting TFTP Downloads . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-9 xiv Contents Transferring Switch Configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-10 B: MAC Address Management Appendix B Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-1 Determining MAC Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-2 Menu: Viewing the Switch’s MAC Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-3 CLI: Viewing the Port and VLAN MAC Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B-4 C: Switch Memory and Configuration Appendix Contents . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-1 Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-2 Overview of Configuration File Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-2 Using the CLI To Implement Configuration Changes . . . . . . . . . . . C-4 Using the Menu and Web Browser Interfaces To Implement Configuration Changes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-7 Using the Menu Interface To Implement Configuration Changes . . C-7 Using Save and Cancel in the Menu Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-8 Rebooting from the Menu Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C-9 Using the Web Browser Interface To Implement Configuration Changes C-10 D: Daylight Savings Time on HP ProCurve Switches xv Contents xvi 1 Selecting a Management Interface S e l e c t i n I g n t a e r M f a a c n e Chapter Contents a g e m e n t Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2 Understanding Management Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2 Advantages of Using the Menu Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-3 Advantages of Using the CLI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4 Advantages of Using the HP Web Browser Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-5 Advantages of Using HP TopTools for Hubs & Switches . . . . . . . . . 1-6 1-1

t n e m e ga n a M a g n it c e le S Selecting a Management Interface Overview Overview e This chapter describes the following: c a f r ■ Management interfaces for the Switches 2512/2524 e t n I ■ Advantages of using each interface Understanding Management Interfaces Management interfaces enable you to reconfigure the switch and to monitor switch status and performance. The HP Switches 2512/2524 offer the following interfaces: ■ Menu interface—a menu-driven interface offering a subset of switch commands through the built-in VT-100/ANSI console—page 1-3 ■ CLI—a command line interface offering the full set of switch commands through the VT-100/ANSI console built into the switch—page 1-4 ■ Web browser interface --a switch interface offering status information and a subset of switch commands through a standard web browser (such as Netscape Navigator or Microsoft Internet Explorer)—page 1-5 ■ HP TopTools for Hubs & Switches--an easy-to-use, browser-based network management tool that works with HP proactive networking features built into managed HP hubs and switches This manual describes how to use the menu interface (chapter 2), the CLI (chapter 3), the web browser interface (chapter 4), and how to use these interfaces to configure and monitor the switch. For information on how to access the web browser interface Help, see “Online Help for the Web Browser Interface” on page 4-12. To use HP TopTools for Hubs & Switches, refer to the HP TopTools User’s Guide and the TopTools online help, which are available electronically with the TopTools software. (To get a copy of HP TopTools for Hubs & Switches software, see the Read Me First document shipped with your switch.)

1-2 Selecting a Management Interface Advantages of Using the Menu Interface Advantages of Using the Menu Interface S e l e c t i n I g n t a e r M f a a c n e a g e m e n t Figure 1-1. Example of the Console Interface Display ■ Provides quick, easy management access to a menu-driven subset of switch configuration and performance features:

• IP addressing • VLANs • Security • Port and Static Trunk Group • Stack Management • Spanning Tree • System information • Passwords and other security features • SNMP communities

The menu interface also provides access for:

• Setup screen • Event Log display • Switch and port status displays • Switch and port statistic and counter displays • Reboots • Software downloads

■ Offers out-of-band access (through the RS-232 connection) to the switch, so network bottlenecks, crashes, lack of configured or correct IP address, and network downtime do not slow or prevent access ■ Enables Telnet (in-band) access to the menu functionality. ■ Allows faster navigation, avoiding delays that occur with slower display of graphical objects over a web browser interface. ■ Provides more security; configuration information and passwords are not seen on the network. 1-3

t n e m e ga n a M a g n it c e le S Selecting a Management Interface Advantages of Using the CLI Advantages of Using the CLI e HP2512> Operator Level c a f r e HP2512# Manager Level t n I HP2512(config)# Global Configuration Level HP2512(<context>)# Context Configuration Levels (port, VLAN) Figure 1-2. Example of The Command Prompt ■ Provides access to the complete set of the switch configuration, perfor mance, and diagnostic features. ■ Offers out-of-band access (through the RS-232 connection) or Telnet (in band) access. ■ Enables quick, detailed system configuration and management access to system operators and administrators experienced in command prompt interfaces. ■ Provides help at each level for determining available options and vari ables. CLI Usage ■ For information on how to use the CLI, refer to chapter 3. "Using the Command Line Interface (CLI)". ■ To perform specific procedures (such as configuring IP addressing or VLANs), use the Contents listing at the front of the manual to locate the information you need. ■ To monitor and analyze switch operation, see chapter 10, "Monitoring and Analyzing Switch Operation". ■ For information on individual CLI commands, refer to the Index or to the "Command Line Interface Reference Guide" available on HP’s ProCurve website at hp.com/go/procurve

1-4 Selecting a Management Interface Advantages of Using the HP Web Browser Interface S Advantages of Using the HP Web e l e c Browser Interface t i n I g n t a e r M f a a c n e a g e m e n t Figure 1-3. Example of the HP Web Browser Interface ■ Easy access to the switch from anywhere on the network ■ Familiar browser interface--locations of window objects consistent with commonly used browsers, uses mouse clicking for navigation, no terminal setup ■ Many features have all their fields in one screen so you can view all values at once ■ More visual cues, using colors, status bars, device icons, and other graphical objects instead of relying solely on alphanumeric values ■ Display of acceptable ranges of values available in configuration list boxes For specific requirements, see “Web Browser Interface Requirements” on page 4-4. 1-5

t n e m e ga n a M a g n it c e le S Selecting a Management Interface Advantages of Using HP TopTools for Hubs & Switches Advantages of Using HP TopTools for Hubs & Switches e c a f r e You can operate HP TopTools from a PC on the network to monitor traffic, t n I manage your hubs and switches, and proactively recommend network changes to increase network uptime and optimize performance. Easy to install and use, HP TopTools for Hubs & Switches is the answer to your management challenges. Figure 1-4. Example of HP TopTools Main Screen HP TopTools for Hubs & Switches enables greater control, uptime, and performance in your network: ■ For networked devices • Enables fast installation of hubs and switches. • Enables you to proactively manage your network by using the Alert Log to quickly identify problems and suggest solutions, saving valu able time.

1-6 Selecting a Management Interface Advantages of Using HP TopTools for Hubs & Switches • Notifies you when HP hubs use “self-healing” features to fix or limit common network problems. S e • Provides a list of discovered devices, with device type, connectivity l e c status, the number of new or open alerts for each device, and the type t i n I of management for each device. g n t a e r M • Provides graphical maps of your networked devices, from which you f a a c can access specific devices. n e a g • Identifies users by port and lets you assign easy-to-remember names e m to any network device. e n t • Enables you to configure and monitor HP networked devices from your network management PC, including identity and status informa tion, port counters, port on/off capability, sensitivity thresholds for traps, IP and security configuration, device configuration report, and other device features. • Enables policy-based management through the Quality of Service feature (QoS) to establish traffic priority policies for controlling and improving throughput across all the HP switches in your network that support this feature. ■ For network traffic: • Watches the network for problems and displays real-time information about network status. • Shows traffic and “top talker” nodes on screen. • Uses traffic monitor diagrams to make bottlenecks easy to see. • Improves network reliability through real-time fault isolation. • Lets you see your entire network without having to put RMON probes on every segment (up to 1500 segments). ■ For network growth: • Monitors, stores, and analyzes network traffic to determine where upgrades are needed. • Uses Network Performance Advisor for automatic traffic analysis and easy-to-understand reports that give clear, easy-to-follow plans for cost-effectivly upgrading your network. 1-7

t n e m e ga n a M a g n it c e le S Selecting a Management Interface Advantages of Using HP TopTools for Hubs & Switches e c a f r e t n I

1-8 2 Using the Menu Interface Chapter Contents Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2 Starting and Ending a Menu Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-3 Main Menu Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-7 U s Screen Structure and Navigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-9 i n g Rebooting the Switch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-12 t h e M Menu Features List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-14 e n u Where To Go From Here . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-15 I n t e r f a c e 2-1

Using the Menu Interface Overview e c a f r e t n I u n e Overview This chapter describes the following features: ■ Overview of the Menu Interface (page 4-1) ■ Starting and ending a Menu session (page 2-3) ■ The Main Menu (page 2-7) ■ Screen structure and navigation (page 2-9) ■ Rebooting the switch (page 2-12) The menu interface operates through the switch console to provide you with a subset of switch commands in an easy-to-use menu format enabling you to: ■ Perform a "quick configuration" of basic parameters, such as the IP addressing needed to provide management access through your network ■ Configure these features:

M e h t g n is U • Manager and Operator pass words • System parameters • IP addressing • Ports • One trunk group • A network monitoring port • Stack Management • Spanning Tree operation • SNMP community names • IP authorized managers • VLANs (Virtual LANs)

■ View status, counters, and Event Log information ■ Download new software system ■ Reboot the switch For a detailed list of menu features, see the "Menu Features List" on page 2-14. Privilege Levels and Password Security. HP strongly recommends that you configure a Manager password to help prevent unauthorized access to your network. A Manager password grants full read-write access to the switch. An Operator password, if configured, grants access to status and counter, Event Log, and the Operator level in the CLI. After you configure passwords on the switch and log off of the interface, access to the menu interface (and the CLI and web browser interface) will require entry of either the Manager or Operator password. (If the switch has only a Manager password, then someone without a password can still gain read-only access.) For more information on passwords, see "Using Password Security" on . 2-2

Menu Interaction with Other Interfaces. Using the Menu Interface Starting and Ending a Menu Session

■ A configuration change made through any switch interface overwrites earlier changes made through any other interface. ■ The Menu Interface and the CLI (Command Line Interface) both use the switch console. To enter the menu from the CLI, use the menu command. To enter the CLI from the Menu interface, select Command Line (CLI) option.) Starting and Ending a Menu Session U You can access the menu interface using any of the following: s i n g ■ A direct serial connection to the switch’s console port, as described in the t h installation guide you received with the switch e M ■ A Telnet connection to the switch console from a networked PC or the e n switch’s web browser interface. Telnet requires that an IP address and u I n subnet mask compatible with your network have already been configured t e r on the switch. f a c e ■ The stack Commander, if the switch is a stack member Note This section assumes that either a terminal device is already configured and connected to the switch (see the Installation Guide shipped with your switch) or that you have already configured an IP address on the switch (required for Telnet access). 2-3 Using the Menu Interface Starting and Ending a Menu Session How To Start a Menu Interface Session In its factory default configuration, the switch console starts with the CLI prompt. To use the menu interface with Manager privileges, go to the Manager level prompt and enter the menu command. 1. Use one of these methods to connect to the switch: • A PC terminal emulator or terminal • Telnet (You can also use the stack Commander if the switch is a stack member. See "HP ProCurve Stack Management" on ). 2. Do one of the following: • If you are using Telnet, go to step 3. e c a • If you are using a PC terminal emulator or a terminal, press [Enter] one f r e t or more times until a prompt appears. n I u 3. When the switch screen appears, do one of the following: n e • If a password has been configured, the password prompt appears. M e h Password: _ t g n i Type the Manager password and press [Enter]. Entering the Manager s U password gives you manager-level access to the switch. (Entering the Operator password gives you operator-level access to the switch. See "Using Password Security" on .) • If no password has been configured, the CLI prompt appears . Go to the next step. 4. When the CLI prompt appears, display the Menu interface by entering the menu command. For example: HP2512# menu [Enter] results in: 2-4 Using the Menu Interface Starting and Ending a Menu Session U s i n g t h e M e n Figure 2-1. The Main Menu with Manager Privileges u I n t e For a description of Main Menu features, see “Main Menu Features” on page r f a 2-7. c e Note To configure the switch to start with the menu interface instead of the CLI, go to the Manager level prompt, enter the setup command, and in the resulting desplay, change the Logon Default parameter to Menu. For more information, see the Installation and Getting Started Guide you received with the switch. How To End a Menu Session and Exit from the Console: The method for ending a menu session and exiting from the console depends on whether, during the session, you made any changes to the switch configu ration that require a switch reboot to activate. (Most changes need only a Save, and do not require a switch reboot.) Configuration changes needing a reboot are marked with an asterisk (*) next to the configured item in the Configura tion menu and also next to the Switch Configuration item in the Main Menu. 2-5 Using the Menu Interface Starting and Ending a Menu Session Asterisk indicates a configuration change that requires a reboot to activate. e Figure 2-2. An Asterisk Indicates a Configuration Change Requiring a Reboot c a f r 1. In the current session, if you have not made configuration changes that e t n I require a switch reboot to activate, return to the Main menu and press [0] u (zero) to log out. Then just exit from the terminal program, turn off the n e terminal, or quit the Telnet session. M e h t 2. If you have made configuration changes that require a switch reboot— g n that is, if an asterisk (*) appears next to a configured item or next to Switch i s U Configuration in the Main menu: a. Return to the Main menu. b. Press [6] to select Reboot Switch and follow the instructions on the reboot screen. Rebooting the switch terminates the menu session, and, if you are using Telnet, disconnects the Telnet session. (See “Rebooting To Activate Configuration Changes” on page 2-13.) 3. Exit from the terminal program, turn off the terminal, or close the Telnet application program. 2-6

Main Menu Features Figure 2-3. The Main Menu View with Manager Privileges Using the Menu Interface Main Menu Features U s i n g t h e M e n u I n t e r f a c e

The Main Menu gives you access to these Menu interface features: ■ Status and Counters: Provides access to display screens showing switch information, port status and counters, port and VLAN address tables, and spanning tree information. (See chapter 10, “Monitoring and Analyzing Switch Operation”.) ■ Switch Configuration: Provides access to configuration screens for displaying and changing the current configuration settings. (See the Con tents listing at the front of this manual.) For a listing of features and parameters configurable through the menu interface, see the "Menu Fea tures List" on page 2-14 . ■ Console Passwords: Provides access to the screen used to set or change Manager-level and Operator-level passwords, and to delete Manager and Operator password protection. (See "Using Password Security" on page page 7-4.) ■ Event Log: Enables you to read progress and error messages that are useful for checking and troubleshooting switch operation. (See “Using the Event Log To Identify Problem Sources” on page 11-11.) 2-7

Using the Menu Interface Main Menu Features e c a f r e t n I u n e M e h t g n i s U ■ Command Line (CLI): Selects the Command Line Interface at the same level (Manager or Operator) that you are accessing in the Menu interface. (See chapter 3, "Using the Command Line Interface (CLI)".) ■ Reboot Switch: Performs a "warm" reboot of the switch, which clears most temporary error conditions, resets the network activity counters to zero, and resets the system up time to zero. A reboot is required to activate a change in the VLAN Support parameter. (See “Rebooting from the Menu Interface” on page C-9.) ■ Download OS: Enables you to download a new software version to the switch. (See appendix A, “Transferring an Operating System or Configu ration”.) ■ Run Setup: Displays the Switch Setup screen for quickly configuring basic switch parameters such as IP addressing, default gateway, logon default interface, spanning tree, and others. (See the Installation and Getting Started guide shipped with your switch.) ■ Stacking: Enables you to use a single IP address and standard network cabling to manage a group of up to 16 switches in the same subnet (broadcast domain). See “HP ProCurve Stack Management” on page 9-5. ■ Logout: Closes the Menu interface and console session, and disconnects Telnet access to the switch. (See “How to End a Menu Session and Exit from the Console” on page 2-5.)

2-8

Screen title – identifies the location within the menu structure System name Actions line Help line describing the selected action or selected parameter field Using the Menu Interface Screen Structure and Navigation Screen Structure and Navigation Menu interface screens include these three elements: ■ Parameter fields and/or read-only information such as statistics ■ Navigation and configuration actions, such as Save, Edit, and Cancel ■ Help line to describe navigation options, individual parameters, and read only data For example, in the following System Information screen: U s i n g t h e M Parameter fields e n u I n t e r f Help describing each of the a c items in the parameter fields e Navigation instructions Figure 4-1. Elements of the Screen Structure “Forms” Design. The configuration screens, in particular, operate similarly to a number of PC applications that use forms for data entry. When you first enter these screens, you see the current configuration for the item you have selected. To change the configuration, the basic operation is to: 1. Press [E] to select the Edit action. 2. Navigate through the screen making all the necessary configuration changes. (See Table 4-1 on the next page.) 3. Press [Enter] to return to the Actions line. From there you can save the configuration changes or cancel the changes. Cancel returns the configu ration to the values you saw when you first entered the screen.

2-9 Using the Menu Interface Screen Structure and Navigation Table 4-1. How To Navigate in the Menu Interface Task: Actions:

e c a fr e t n I u n e M e h t g n is U Execute an action from the “Actions –>” list at the bottom of the screen: Reconfigure (edit) a parameter setting or a field: Exit from a read-only screen. Use either of the following methods: • Use the arrow keys ( [ <] ,or [ >] ) to highlight the action you want to execute, then press [Enter]. • Press the key corresponding to the capital letter in the action name. For example, in a configuration menu, press [E] to select Edit and begin editing parameter values. 1. Select a configuration item, such as System Name. (See figure 4-1.) 2. Press [E] (for Edit on the Actions line). 3. Use [Tab] or the arrow keys ([ <] , [ >] , [ ^] , or [ v] ) to highlight the item or field. 4. Do one of the following: – If the parameter has preconfigured values, either use the Space bar to select a new option or type the first part of your selection and the rest of the selection appears automatically. (The help line instructs you to “Select” a value.) – If there are no preconfigured values, type in a value (the Help line instructs you to “Enter” a value). 5. If you want to change another parameter value, return to step 3. 6. If you are finished editing parameters in the displayed screen, press [Enter] to return to the Actions line and do one of the following: – To save and activate configuration changes, press [S] (for the Save action). This saves the changes in the startup configuration and also implements the change in the currently running configuration. (See appendix C, "Switch Memory and Configuration.) – To exit from the screen without saving any changes that you have made (or if you have not made changes), press [C] (for the Cancel action). Note: In the menu interface, executing Save activates most parameter changes and saves them in the startup configuration (or flash) memory, and it is therefore not necessary to reboot the switch after making these changes. But if an asterisk appears next to any menu item you reconfigure, the switch will not activate or save the change for that item until you reboot the switch. In this case, rebooting should be done after you have made all desired changes and then returned to the Main Menu. 7. When you finish editing parameters, return to the Main Menu. 8. If necessary, reboot the switch by highlighting Reboot Switch in the Main Menu and pressing [Enter]. (See the Note, above.) Press [B] (for the Back action).

2-10 Using the Menu Interface Screen Structure and Navigation To get Help on individual parameter descriptions. In most screens there is a Help option in the Actions line. Whenever any of the items in the Actions line is highlighted, press [H], and a separate help screen is displayed. For example: Pressing [H] or highlighting Help and pressing [Enter] displays Help for the parameters listed in the upper part of the screen U s i n g t Highlight on any item h e in the Actions line M indicates that the e Actions line is active. n u I n t e r The Help line provides f a a brief descriptor of c e the highlighted Action item or parameter. Figure 4-2. Example Showing How To Display Help To get Help on the actions or data fields in each screen: Use the arrow keys ( [ <] , [ >] , [ ^] , or [ v] ) to select an action or data field. The help line under the Actions items describes the currently selected action or data field. For guidance on how to navigate in a screen: See the instructions provided at the bottom of the screen, or refer to “Screen Structure and Navigation” on page 2-9.) 2-11

e c a fr e t n I u n e M e h t g n is U Using the Menu Interface Rebooting the Switch Reboot Switch option Rebooting the Switch Rebooting the switch from the menu interface ■ Terminates all current sessions and performs a reset of the operating system ■ Activates any configuration changes that require a reboot ■ Resets statistical counters to zero (Note that statistical counters can be reset to zero without rebooting the switch.) To Reboot the switch, use the Reboot Switch option in the Main Menu. (Note that the Reboot Switch option is not available if you log on in Operator mode; that is, if you enter an Operator password instead of a manager password at the password prompt.) Figure 4-3. The Reboot Switch Option in the Main Menu

2-12

Asterisk indicates a configuration change that requires a reboot in order to take effect. Reminder to reboot the switch to activate configuration changes. Using the Menu Interface Rebooting the Switch Rebooting To Activate Configuration Changes. Configuration changes for most parameters become effective as soon as you save them. However, you must reboot the switch in order to implement a change in the Maximum VLANs to support parameter. (To access this parameter, go to the Main menu and select 2. Switch Configuration, then 8. VLAN Menu, then 1. VLAN Support.) If configuration changes requiring a reboot have been made, the switch displays an asterisk (*) next to the menu item in which the change has been made. For example, if you change and save the value for the Maximum VLANs to support parameter, an asterisk appears next to the VLAN Support entry in the VLAN Menu screen, and also next to the the Switch Configuration . . . entry in the Main menu, as shown in figure 4-6: U s i n g t h e M e n u I n t e r f a c e Figure 4-4. Indication of a Configuration Change Requiring a Reboot To activate changes indicated by the asterisk, go to the Main Menu and select the Reboot Switch option.

Note Executing the write memory command in the CLI does not affect pending configuration changes indicated by an asterisk in the menu interface. That is, only a reboot from the menu interface or a boot or reload command from the CLI will activate a pending configuration change indicated by an asterisk. 2-13

Using the Menu Interface Menu Features List e c a f r e t n I u n e M e h t g n i s U Menu Features List Status and Counters • General System Information • Switch Management Address Information • Port Status • Port Counters • Address Table • Port Address Table • Spanning Tree Information Switch Configuration • System Information • Port/Trunk Settings • Network Monitoring Port • Spanning Tree Operation • IP Configuration • SNMP Community Names • IP authorized Managers • VLAN Menu Console Passwords Event Log Command Line (CLI) Reboot Switch Download OS Run Setup Stacking • Stacking Status (This Switch) • Stacking Status (All) • Stack Configuration • Stack Management (Available in Stack Commander Only) • Stack Access (Available in Stack Commander Only) Logout

2-14 Using the Menu Interface Where To Go From Here Where To Go From Here This chapter provides an overview of the menu interface and how to use it. The following table indicates where to turn for detailed information on how to use the individual features available through the menu interface. Option Where To Turn To use the Run Setup option See the Installation and Getting Started Guide U shipped with the switch. s i n g To use the ProCurve Stack Manager “HP ProCurve Stack Management” on page 9-5 t h e

To view and monitor switch status and counters To learn how to configure and use passwords Chapter 10, "Monitoring and Analyzing Switch M e Operation" n u I "Using Password Security" on page 7-4 n t e r f a c

To learn how to use the Event Log "Using the Event Log To Identify Problem Sources" e on page 11-11 To learn how the CLI operates Chapter 3, "Using the Command Line Interface (CLI)" To download software (the OS) Appendix A, "File Transfers"

For a description of how switch memory handles configuration changes For information on other switch features and how to configure them Appendix C, "Switch Memory and Configuration" See the Table of Contents at the front of this manual.

2-15 Using the Menu Interface Where To Go From Here e c a f r e t n I u n e M e h t g n i s U 2-16 3 Using the Command Line Interface (CLI) Chapter Contents Overview. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2 Accessing the CLI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2 Using the CLI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2 Privilege Levels at Logon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-3 Privilege Level Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4 Operator Privileges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-4 Manager Privileges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-5 Changing Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-6 U How To Move Between Levels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7 s i n Moving Between the CLI and the Menu Interface. . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7 g I n t Changing Parameter Settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7 h t e e r f C Listing Commands and Command Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8 a o c m e Listing Commands Available at Any Privilege Level . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8 m ( C a Type "?" To List Available Commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-8 L n I ) d Use [Tab] To Search for or Complete a Command Word . . . . . . . . 3-9 L i n Command Option Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-10 e Conventions for Command Option Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-10 Listing Command Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-11 Displaying CLI "Help" . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-11 Displaying Command-List Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-11 Displaying Help for an Individual Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-12 Configuration Commands and the Context Configuration Modes . . 3-13 Port or Trunk-Group Context . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-13 VLAN Context . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-15 CLI Control and Editing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-16 3-1

e n i L d n a m m o C e h t g n is U Using the Command Line Interface (CLI) Overview Overview The CLI is a text-based command interface for configuring and monitoring the switch. The CLI gives you access to the switch’s full set of commands while providing the same password protection that is used in the web browser interface and the menu interface. Accessing the CLI Like the menu interface, the CLI is accessed through the switch console, and, in the switch’s factory default state, is the default interface when you start a console session. You can access the console out-of-band by directly connecting a terminal device to the switch, or in-band by using Telnet either from a terminal device or through the web browser interface. Also, if you are using the menu interface, you can access the CLI by selecting ) I the Command Line (CLI) option in the Main Menu. L C ( e c a f r e t n Using the CLI I The CLI offers these privilege levels to help protect the switch from unautho rized access: • Operator • Manager • Global Configuration • Context Configuration Note CLI commands are not case-sensitive. When you use the CLI to make a configuration change, the switch writes the change to the Running-Config file in volatile memory. This allows you to test your configuration changes before making them permanent. to make changes permanent, you must use the write memory command to save them to the Startup Config file in non-volatile memory. If you reboot the switch without

3-2 Using the Command Line Interface (CLI) Using the CLI first using write memory, all changes made since the last reboot or write memory (whichever is later) will be lost. For more on switch memory and saving configuration changes, see appendix C, "Switch Memory and Configuration". Privilege Levels at Logon Privilege levels control the type of access to the CLI. To implement this control, you must set at least a Manager password. Without a Manager password configured, anyone having serial port, Telnet, or web browser access to the switch can reach all CLI levels. (For more on setting passwords, see "Using Password Security" on page 7-4.) When you use the CLI to log on to the switch, and passwords are set, you will be prompted to enter a password. For example: U s i n g I n t h t e e r f C a o c m e m ( C Password Prompt a L n I ) d L i n e Figure 3-1. Example of CLI Log-On Screen with Password(s) Set In the above case, you will enter the CLI at the level corresponding to the password you provide (operator or manager). If no passwords are set when you log onto the CLI, you will enter at the Manager level. For example: HP2512# _ 3-3 Using the Command Line Interface (CLI) Using the CLI Caution HP strongly recommends that you configure a Manager password. If a Man ager password is not configured, then the Manager level is not password protected, and anyone having in-band or out-of-band access to the switch may be able to reach the Manager level and compromise switch and network security. Note that configuring only an Operator password does not prevent access to the Manager level by intruders who have the Operator password. Pressing the Clear button on the front of the switch removes password protection. For this reason, it is recommended that you protect the switch from physical access by unauthorized persons. If you are concerned about switch security and operation, you should install the switch in a secure location, such as a locked wiring closet. Privilege Level Operation

e n i L d n a m m o C e h t g n is U Operator Privileges Manager Privileges ) I L C ( e c a f r e t n I Operator Level Manager Level Global Configuration Level Context Configuration Level

Figure 3-2. Privilege Level Access Sequence Operator Privileges At the Operator level you can examine the current configuration and move between interfaces without being able to change the configuration. A ">" character delimits the Operator-level prompt. For example: HP2512> _ (Example of the Operator prompt.) When using enable to move to the Manager level, the switch prompts you for the Manager password if one has already been configured. 3-4

Manager Privileges Using the Command Line Interface (CLI) Using the CLI

Manager privileges give you three additional levels of access: Manager, Global Configuration, and Context Configuration. (See figure .) A "#" character delimits any Manager prompt. For example: HP2512#_ (Example of the Manager prompt.) ■ Manager level: Provides all Operator level privileges plus the ability to perform system-level actions that do not require saving changes to the system configuration file. The prompt for the Manager level contains only the system name and the "#" delimiter, as shown above. To select this level, enter the enable command at the Operator level prompt and enter the Manager password, when prompted. For example: HP2512> enable (Enter enable at the Operator prompt.) HP2512# _ (The Manager prompt.) ■ Global Configuration level: Provides all Operator and Manager level privileges, and enables you to make configuration changes to any of the switch’s software features. The prompt for the Global Configuration level U includes the system name and "(config)". To select this level, enter the s i n config command at the Manager prompt. For example: g I n t h t e e HP2512# _ (Enter config at the Manager prompt.) r f C a o HP2512(config)#_ (The Global Config prompt.) c m e m ( ■ Context Configuration level: Provides all Operator and Manager C a L n I privileges, and enables you to make configuration changes in a specific ) d L context, such as one or more ports or a VLAN. The prompt for the Context i n e Configuration level includes the system name and the selected context. For example: HP2512(eth-1)# HP2512(vlan-10)# The Context level is useful, for example, if you want to execute several commands directed at the same port or VLAN, or if you want to shorten the command strings for a specific context area. To select this level, enter the specific context at the Global Configuration level prompt. For example, to select the context level for an existing VLAN with the VLAN ID of 10, you would enter the following command and see the indicated result: HP2512(config)# vlan 10 HP2512(vlan-10)# 3-5 Using the Command Line Interface (CLI) Using the CLI Changing Interfaces. If you change from the CLI to the menu interface, or the reverse, you will remain at the same privilege level. For example, entering the menu command from the Operator level of the CLI takes you to the Operator privilege level in the menu interface. Table 3-1. Privilege Level Hierarchy Privilege Level Example of Prompt and Permitted Operations Operator Privilege

e n i L d n a Operator Level HP2512> show <command> setup ping <argument> link-test <argument> enable menu logoff Manager Privilige ) I L View status and configuration information. Perform connectivity tests. Move from the Operator level to the Manager level. Move from the CLI interface to the menu interface. Exit from the CLI interface and terminate the console session.

m m o C e h t g Manager Level HP2512# Perform system-level actions such as system control, monitoring, and diagnostic C ( commands, plus any of the Operator-level commands. For a list of available e c commands, enter ? at the prompt. a f r e t n I

n is U Global Configuration Level HP2512(config)# Execute configuration commands, plus all Operator and Manager commands . For a list of available commands, enter ? at the prompt. Context Configuration Level HP2512(eth-5)# HP2512(vlan-100)# Execute context-specific configuration commands, such as a particular VLAN or switch port. This is useful for shortening the command strings you type, and for entering a series of commands for the same context. For a list of available commands, enter ? at the prompt.

3-6

How To Move Between Levels Using the Command Line Interface (CLI) Using the CLI

Change in Levels Example of Prompt , Command, and Result

Operator level to Manager level Manager level to Global configuration level Global configuration level to a Context configuration level Context configuration level to another Context configuration level Move from any level to the preceding level Move from any level to the Manager level HP2512> enable Password:_ After you enter enable, the Password prompt appears. After you enter the Manager password, this prompt appears: HP2512#_ HP2512# config HP2512(config)# HP2512(config)# vlan-10 HP2512(vlan-10)# HP2512(vlan-10)# interface ethernet 3 U s HP2512(int-3)# i n g I n t h t e e r f C a o c m e HP2512(int-3)# exit m ( C a HP2512(config)# exit L n I ) d HP2512# exit L i HP2512> n e HP2512(int-3)# end HP2512# —or— HP2512(config)# end HP2512#

Moving Between the CLI and the Menu Interface. When moving between interfaces, the switch retains the current privilege level (Manager or Operator). That is, if you are at the Operator level in the menu and select the Command Line Interface (CLI) option from the Main Menu, the CLI prompt appears at the Operator level. Changing Parameter Settings. Regardless of which interface is used (CLI, menu interface, or web browser interface), the most recently configured version of a parameter setting overrides any earlier settings for that parameter. 3-7

e n i L d n a m m o C e h t g n is U Using the Command Line Interface (CLI) Using the CLI For example, if you use the CLI to set a Manager password, and then later use the Setup screen (in the menu interface) to set a different Manager password, then the first password will be replaced by the second one. Listing Commands and Command Options At any privilege level you can: ■ List all of the commands available at that level ■ List the options for a specific command Listing Commands Available at Any Privilege Level At a given privilege level you can execute the commands that level offers, plus all of the commands available at preceding levels. Similarly, at a given privilege level, you can list all of that level’s commands plus the commands made available at preceding levels. For example, at the Operator level, you can list and execute only the Operator level commands. However, at the Manager level, you can list and execute the commands available at both the Operator and Manager levels. Type "?" To List Available Commands. Typing the ? symbol lists the ) I L commands you can execute at the current privilege level. For example, typing C ( ? at the Operator level produces this listing: e c a f r e t n I Figure 3-3. Example of the Operator Level Command Listing

3-8 Using the Command Line Interface (CLI) Using the CLI Typing ? at the Manager level produces this listing: When - - MORE - - appears, use the Space bar or [Return] to list U s additional commands. i n g I n t h t e e r f C a o Figure 3-4. Example of the Manager-Level Command Listing c m e m ( C a L n I When - - MORE - - appears, there are more commands in the listing. To list the ) d L next screenfull of commands, press the Space bar. To list the remaining i n e commands one-by-one, repeatedly press [Enter]. Typing ? at the Global Configuration level or the Context Configuration level produces similar results. Use [Tab] To Search for or Complete a Command Word. You can use [Tab] to help you find CLI commands or to quickly complete the current word in a command. To do so, press [Tab] immediately after typing the last letter of the last keyword in the CLI (with no spaces allowed). For example, at the Global Configuration level, if you press [Tab] immediately after typing "t", the CLI displays the available command options that begin with "t". For example: HP2512(config)# t[Tab] telnet-server time trunk telnet HP2512(config)# t 3-9

e n i L d n a m m o C e h t g n is U Using the Command Line Interface (CLI) Using the CLI As mentioned above, if you type part of a command word and press [Tab], the CLI completes the current word (if you have typed enough of the word for the CLI to distinguish it from other possibilities), including hyphenated exten sions. For example: HP2512(config)# port[Tab] HP2512(config)# port-security _ Pressing [Tab] after a completed command word lists the further options for that command. HP2512(config)# stack [Tab] commander <commander-str> join <mac-addr> auto-join transmission-interval <integer> <cr> HP2512(config)# stack Command Option Displays Conventions for Command Option Displays. When you use the CLI to ) I list options for a particular command, you will see one or more of the following L C ( conventions to help you interpret the command data: e c ■ Braces ( < > ) indicate a required choice. a f r e ■ Square brackets ([ ]) indicate optional elements. t n I ■ Vertical bars ( | ) separate alternative, mutually exclusive options in a command. The braces (< >) show that the trunk command requires all three parameters. The vertical bar ( | ) shows that either trunk or lacp must be included. The square brackets ([ ]) show that ethernet is optional. Figure 3-5.Example of Command Option Conventions

3-10 Using the Command Line Interface (CLI) Using the CLI Thus, if you wanted to create a port trunk group using ports 5 - 8, the above conventions show that you could do so using any of the following forms of the trunk command: HP2512(config)# trunk trk1 trunk 5-8 HP2512(config)# trunk trk1 trunk e 5-8 HP2512(config)# trunk trk1 lacp 5-8 HP2512(config)# trunk trk1 lacp e 5-8 Listing Command Options. You can use the CLI to remind you of the options available for a command by entering command keywords followed by ?. For example, suppose you wanted to see the command options for config uring port 5: U s i n g I n t h t This example displays the command options e e r for configuring port 5 on the switch. f C a o c m e m ( C a L n I ) d Figure 3-6. Example of How To List the Options for a Specific Command L i n e Displaying CLI "Help" CLI Help provides two types of context-sensitive information: ■ Command list with a brief summary of each command’s purpose ■ Detailed information on how to use individual commands Displaying Command-List Help. You can display a listing of command Help summaries for all commands available at the current privilege level. That is, when you are at the Operator level, you can display the Help summaries only for Operator-Level commands. At the Manager level, you can display the Help summaries for both the Operator and Manager levels, and so on. Syntax: help For example, to list the Operator-Level commands with their purposes: 3-11

e n i L d n a m m o C e h t g n is U Using the Command Line Interface (CLI) Using the CLI Figure 3-7. Example of Context-Sensitive Command-List Help Displaying Help for an Individual Command. You can display Help for any command that is available at the current context level by entering enough of the command string to identify the command, along with help. Syntax: <command string> help For example, to list the Help for the interface command in the Global Configuration privilege level: ) I L C ( e c a f r e t n I Figure 3-8. Example of How To Display Help for a Specific Command A similar action lists the Help showing additional parameter options for a given command. The following example illustrates how to list the Help for an interface command acting on a specific port:

3-12 Using the Command Line Interface (CLI) Using the CLI Figure 3-9. Example of Help for a Specific Instance of a Command Note that if you try to list the help for an individual command from a privilege level that does not include that command, the switch returns an error message. For example, trying to list the help for the interface command while at the global configuration level produces this result: HP2512# interface help U Invalid input: interface s i n g I n t Configuration Commands and the Context h t e e r f C Configuration Modes a o c m e m ( C a You can execute any configuration command in the global configuration mode L n I ) d or in selected context modes. However, using a context mode enables you to L i n execute context-specific commands faster, with shorter command strings. e The Switch 2512 and 2524 offer interface (port or trunk group) and VLAN context configuration modes: Port or Trunk-Group Context . Includes port- or trunk-specific commands that apply only to the selected port(s) or trunk group, plus the global configuration, Manager, and Operator commands. The prompt for this mode includes the identity of the selected port(s):

HP2512(config)# interface e 5-8 HP2512(config)# interface e trk1 HP2512(eth-5-8)# HP2512(eth-Trk1)# Command executed at configuration level for entering port or trk1 static trunk-group context. Resulting prompt showing port or static trunk contexts.

3-13

e n i L d n a m m o C e h t g n is U Using the Command Line Interface (CLI) Using the CLI HP2512(eth-5-8)# ? HP2512(eth-5-8)# ? ) I L C ( e c a f r e t n I Lists the commands you can use in the port or static trunk context, plus the Manager, Operator, and context commands you can execute at this level. In the port context, the first block of commands in the "?" listing show the context-specific commands that will affect only ports 5-8. The remaining commands in the listing are Manager, Operator, and context commands.

Figure 3-10. Context-Specific Commands Affecting Port Context 3-14 Using the Command Line Interface (CLI) Using the CLI VLAN Context . Includes VLAN-specific commands that apply only to the selected VLAN, plus Manager and Operator commands. The prompt for this mode includes the VLAN ID of the selected VLAN. For example, if you had already configured a VLAN with an ID of 100 in the switch: HP2512(config)# vlan 100 Command executed at configura tion level to enter VLAN 100 context. HP2512(vlan-100)# Resulting prompt showing VLAN 100 context. HP2512(vlan-100)# ? Lists commands you can use in the VLAN context, plus Manager, Oper ator, and context commands you can execute at this level. In the VLAN context, the first block of U s commands in i n g the "?" listing I n t h t show the e e r commands that f C a o c will affect only m e m vlan-100. ( C a L n I ) d L i n e The remaining commands in the listing are Manager, Operator, and context commands. Figure 3-11. Context-Specific Commands Affecting VLAN Context 3-15

e n i L d n a m m o C e h t g n is U Using the Command Line Interface (CLI) CLI Control and Editing CLI Control and Editing Keystrokes Function [Ctrl] [A] Jumps to the first character of the command line. [Ctrl] [B] or [ <] Moves the cursor back one character. [Ctrl] [C] Terminates a task and displays the command prompt. [Ctrl] [D] Deletes the character at the cursor. [Ctrl] [E] Jumps to the end of the current command line. [Ctrl] [F] or [ >] Moves the cursor forward one character. [Ctrl] [K] Deletes from the cursor to the end of the command line. [Ctrl] [L] or [Ctrl] [R] Repeats current command line on a new line. [Ctrl] [N] or [ v] Enters the next command line in the history buffer. ) I L [Ctrl] [P] or [ ^] Enters the previous command line in the history buffer. C ( e c [Ctrl] [U] or [Ctrl] [X] Deletes from the cursor tothe beginning of the command line. a f r e t [Ctrl] [W] Deletes the last word typed. n I [Esc] [B] Moves the cursor backward one word. [Esc] [D] Deletes from the cursor to the end of the word. [Esc] [F] Moves the cursor forward one word. [Delete] or [Backspace] Deletes the first character to the left of the cursor in the command line.

3-16 4 Using the HP Web Browser Interface Chapter Contents Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 General Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Web Browser Interface Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Starting an HP Web Browser Interface Session with the Switch . . . . . . . . . . 5 Using a Standalone Web Browser in a PC or UNIX Workstation . . . . . . 5 Using HP TopTools for Hubs & Switches . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Tasks for Your First HP Web Browser Interface Session . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Viewing the “First Time Install” Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Creating Usernames and Passwords in the Browser Interface . . . . . . . 9 Using the Passwords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Using the User Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 If You Lose a Password . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Online Help for the HP Web Browser Interface . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Support/Mgmt URLs Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Support URL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Help and the Management Server URL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Providing Online Help . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 U s i If Online Help Fails To Operate. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 n g Policy Management and Configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 t h e I n H Status Reporting Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 t P e r W f The Overview Window . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 a e c e b The Port Utilization and Status Displays . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 B r Port Utilization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 o w Utilization Guideline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 s e To change the amount of bandwidth the Port Utilization r bar graph shows . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 To display values for each graph bar. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Port Status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 The Alert Log . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Sorting the Alert Log Entries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Alert Types . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Viewing Detail Views of Alert Log Entries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 The Status Bar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Setting Fault Detection Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 4-1

r e s w o r B be W P H e h t g n is U Using the HP Web Browser Interface Overview Overview The HP web browser interface built into the switch lets you easily access the switch from a browser-based PC on your network. This lets you do the following: ■ Optimize your network uptime by using the Alert Log and other diagnostic tools ■ Make configuration changes to the switch ■ Maintain security by configuring usernames and passwords This chapter covers the following: ■ General features (page 4-3). ■ System requirements for using the web browser interface (page 4-4) ■ Starting a web browser interface session (page 4-5) ■ Tasks for your first web browser interface session (page 4-8): • Creating usernames and passwords in the web browser interface (page 4-9) • Selecting the fault detection configuration for the Alert Log operation (page 4-24) • Getting access to online help for the web browser interface (page 4-12) ■ Description of the web browser interface: • Overview window and tabs (page 4-16) e • Port Utilization and Status displays (page 4-17) c a f r • Alert Log and Alert types (page 4-20) e t n I • Setting the Fault Detection Policy (page 4-24) Note If you want security beyond that achieved with user names and passwords, you can disable access to the web browser interface. This is done by either executing no web-management at the Command Prompt or changing the Web Agent Enabled parameter setting to No (page 5-22) .

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General Features Using the HP Web Browser Interface General Features

The Series 2500 switches include these web browser interface features: Switch Configuration: • Ports • VLANs and Primary VLAN • Fault detection • Port monitoring (mirroring) • System information • Enable/Disable Multicast Filtering (IGMP) and Spanning Tree • IP • Stacking • Support and management URLs Switch Security: • Passwords • Authorized IP Managers • Port security and Intrusion Log Switch Diagnostics: U s i n • Ping/Link Test g t h • Device reset e I n H • Configuration report t P e r W f a e c Switch status e b B • Port utilization r o w • Port counters s e r • Port status • Alert log Switch system information listing 4-3 Using the HP Web Browser Interface Web Browser Interface Requirements Web Browser Interface Requirements You can use equipment meeting the following requirements to access the web browser interface on your intranet. Table 4-1. System Requirements for Accessing the HP Web Browser Interface Platform Entity and OS Version Minimum Recommended PC Platform 90 MHz Pentium 120 MHz Pentium HP-UX Platform (9.x or 10.x) 100 MHz 120 MHz RAM 16 Mbytes 32 Mbytes Screen Resolution 800 X 600 1,024 x 768 Color Count 256 65,536

Internet Browser (English-language browser only) PCs: • Netscape® Communicator 4.x • Microsoft® Internet Explorer 4.x UNIX: Netscape Navigator 4.5 or later PCs: • Netscape Communicator 4.5 or later • Microsoft® Internet Explorer 5.0 or later UNIX: Netscape Navigator 4.5 or later

PC Operating System Microsoft Windows® 95 and Windows NT r e s UNIX® Operating System Standard UNIX® OS w o

r B be W P H e h t g n is U e c a fr e t n I HP TopTools for Hubs & Switches (Optional) For the HP ProCurve Switch 2512 and 2524, use product HP J2569R or later.

4-4 Using the HP Web Browser Interface Starting an HP Web Browser Interface Session with the Switch Starting an HP Web Browser Interface Session with the Switch You can start a web browser session in the following ways: ■ Using a standalone web browser on a network connection from a PC or UNIX workstation: • Directly connected to your network • Connected through remote access to your network ■ Using a management station running HP TopTools for Hubs & Switches on your network Using a Standalone Web Browser in a PC or UNIX Workstation This procedure assumes that you have a supported web browser (page 4-4) installed on your PC or workstation, and that an IP address has been config ured on the switch. (For more on assigning an IP address, refer to "IP Configuration" on page 5-3.) 1. Make sure the JavaTM applets are enabled for your browser. If they are not, do one of the following: U • In Netscape 4.03, click on Edit, Preferences..., Advanced, then select s i n Enable Java and Enable JavaScript options. g t h • In Microsoft Internet Explorer 4.x, click on View, Internet Options, e I n H t Security, Custom, [Settings] and scroll to the Java Permissions. Then refer P e r W f to the online Help for specific information on enabling the Java a e c e b applets. B r o w s e r 4-5

r e s w o r B be W P H e h t g n is U Using the HP Web Browser Interface Starting an HP Web Browser Interface Session with the Switch 2. Type the IP address (or DNS name) of the switch in the browser Location or Address field and press [Enter]. (It is not necessary to include .) switch2512 [Enter] (example of a DNS-type name) 10.11.12.195 [Enter] (example of an IP address) If you are using a Domain Name Server (DNS), your device may have a name associated with it (for example, switch2512) that you can type in the Location or Address field instead of the IP address. Using DNS names typically improves browser performance. See your network administrator for any name associated with the switch. Using HP TopTools for Hubs & Switches HP TopTools for Hubs & Switches is designed for installation on a network management workstation. For this reason, the HP TopTools system require ments are different from the system requirements for accessing the switch’s web browser interface from a non-management PC or workstation. For HP TopTools requirements, refer to the information provided with HP TopTools for Hubs & Switches. This procedure assumes that: ■ You have installed the recommended web browser on a PC or workstation that serves as your network management station. ■ The networked device you want to access has been assigned an IP address and (optionally) a DNS name and has been discovered by HP TopTools for Hubs & Switches. (For more on assigning an IP address, refer to "IP Configuration" on page 5-3.) e c a f r To establish a web browser session with HP TopTools running, do the e t n following on the network management station: I 1. Make sure the JavaTM applets are enabled for your web browser. If they are not, refer to the web browser online Help for specific information on enabling the Java applets. 2. Do one of the following tasks: • On the HP TopTools Maps view, double-click on the symbol for the networking device that you want to access. • In HP TopTools, in the Topology Information dialog box, in the device list, double-click on the entry for the device you want to access (IP address or DNS name).

4-6 Using the HP Web Browser Interface Starting an HP Web Browser Interface Session with the Switch 3. The web browser interface automatically starts with the Status Overview window displayed for the selected device, as shown in figure 4-1. Note If the Registration window appears, click on the Status tab.

Alert Log First-Time Install Alert U s i n g t Figure 4-1. Example of Status Overview Screen h e I n H t P e r W f a

Note The above screen appears somewhat different if the switch is configured as a e c e b stack Commander. For an example, see figure 1-3 on page 1-5. B r o w s e r 4-7

r e s w o r B be W P H e h t g n is U Using the HP Web Browser Interface Tasks for Your First HP Web Browser Interface Session Tasks for Your First HP Web Browser Interface Session The first time you access the web browser interface, there are three tasks that you should perform: ■ Review the “First Time Install” window ■ Set Manager and Operator passwords ■ Set access to the web browser interface online help Viewing the “First Time Install” Window When you access the switch’s web browser interface for the first time, the Alert log contains a “First Time Install” alert, as shown in figure 4-2. This gives you information about first time installations, and provides an immediate opportunity to set passwords for security and to specify a Fault Detection policy, which determines the types of messages that will be displayed in the Alert Log. Double click on First Time Install in the Alert log (figure 4-1 on page 4-7). The web browser interface then displays the “First Time Install” window, below. e c a f r e t n I Figure 4-2. First-Time Install Window

4-8 Using the HP Web Browser Interface Tasks for Your First HP Web Browser Interface Session This window is the launching point for the basic configuration you need to perform to set web browser interface passwords to maintain security and Fault Detection policy, which determines the types of messages that will be displayed in the Alert Log. To set web browser interface passwords, click on secure access to the device to display the Device Passwords screen, and then go to the next page. (You can also access the password screen by clicking on the Security tab.) To set Fault Detection policy, click on select the fault detection configuration in the second bullet in the window and go to the section, “Setting Fault Detection Policy” on page 4-24.(You can also access the password screen by clicking on the Configuration tab, and then [Fault Detection] button.) Creating Usernames and Passwords in the Browser Interface You may want to create both a username and password to create access security for your switch. There are two levels of access to the interface that can be controlled by setting user names and passwords: ■ Operator. An Operator-level user name and password allows read-only access to most of the web browser interface, but prevents access to the Security window. ■ Manager. A Manager-level user name and password allows full read/ write access to the web browser interface. U s i n g t h e I n H t P e r W f a e c e b B r o w s e r 4-9

r e s w o r B be W P H e h t g n is U Using the HP Web Browser Interface Tasks for Your First HP Web Browser Interface Session Figure 4-3. The Device Passwords Window To set the passwords: 1. Access the Device Passwords screen by one of the following methods: • If the Alert Log includes a “First Time Install” event entry, double click on this event, then, in the resulting display, click on the secure access to the device link. e c • Select the Security tab. a f r e 2. Click in the appropriate box in the Device Passwords window and enter t n I user names and passwords. You will be required to repeat the password strings in the confirmation boxes. Both the user names and passwords can be up to 16 printable ASCII characters. 3. Click on [Apply Changes] to activate the user names and passwords. Note Passwords you assign in the web browser interface will overwrite previous passwords assigned in either the web browser interface, the Command Prompt, or the switch console. That is, the most recently assigned passwords are the switch’s passwords, regardless of which interface was used to assign the string.

4-10 Using the HP Web Browser Interface Tasks for Your First HP Web Browser Interface Session Using the Passwords Figure 4-4. Example of the Password Window in the Web Browser Interface The manager and operator passwords are used to control access to all switch interfaces. Once set, you will be prompted to supply the password every time you try to access the switch through any of its interfaces. The password you enter determines the capability you have during that session: ■ Entering the manager password gives you full read/write capabilities ■ Entering the operator password gives you read and limited write capabil ities. Using the User Names U If you also set user names in the web browser interface screen, you must s i n supply the correct user name for web browser interface access. If a user name g t has not been set, then leave the User Name field in the password window h e I n blank. H t P e r W f a Note that the Command Prompt and switch console interfaces use only the e c e b password, and do not prompt you for the User Name. B r o w s If You Lose a Password e r If you lose the passwords, you can clear them by pressing the Clear button on the front of the switch. This action deletes all password and user name protection from all of the switch’s interfaces. The Clear button is provided for your convenience, but its presence means that if you are concerned with the security of the switch configuration and operation, you should make sure the switch is installed in a secure location, such as a locked wiring closet. 4-11

r e s w o r B be W P H e h t g n is U Using the HP Web Browser Interface Tasks for Your First HP Web Browser Interface Session Online Help for the HP Web Browser Interface Online Help is available for the web browser interface. You can use it by clicking on the question mark button in the upper right corner of any of the web browser interface screens. The Help Button Figure 4-5. The Help Button Context-sensitive help is provided for the screen you are on. Note If you do not have HP TopTools for Hubs and Switches installed on your network and do not have an active connection to the World Wide Web, then Online help for the web browser interface will not be available. For more on Help access and operation, refer to “Help and the Management Server URL” on page 4-14. e c a f r e t n I

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3. Enter URLs for: Using the HP Web Browser Interface Support/Mgmt URLs Feature Support/Mgmt URLs Feature The Support/Mgmt URLs window enables you to change the World Wide Web Universal Resource Locator (URL) for two functions: ■ Support URL – a support information site for your switch ■ Management Server URL – the site for online help for the web browser interface, and, if set up, the URL of a network management station running HP TopTools for Hubs & Switches. 1. Click Here 2. Click Here U s i n g t h e I n H t P e r W f a e c e b 4. Click on Apply Changes B

- the support information source you want the switch to access r o when you click on the web browser interface Support tab – the w default is HP’s ProCurve network products World Wide Web s e home page r - the URL of the network Management server or other source of the online help files for this web browser inter- face. (The default accesses Help on HP’s World Wide Web site.) Figure 4-6. The Default Support/Mgmt URLs Window 4-13

r e s w o r B be W P H e h t g n is U Using the HP Web Browser Interface Support/Mgmt URLs Feature Support URL This is the site that the switch accesses when you click on the Support tab on the web browser interface. The default URL is: hp.com/go/procurve which is the World Wide Web site for Hewlett-Packard’s networking products. Click on the [Support] button on that page and you can get to support information regarding your switch, including white papers, operating system (OS) updates, and more. You could instead enter the URL for a local site that you use for entering reports about network performance, or whatever other function you would like to be able to easily access by clicking on the [Support] tab. Help and the Management Server URL This field specifies which of the following two locations the switch will use to find online Help for the web browser interface: ■ The URL of online Help provided by HP on the world wide web ■ The URL of a network management station running HP TopTools for Hubs & Switches Providing Online Help. The Help files are automatically available if you install HP TopTools for Hubs & Switches on your network or if you already have Internet access to the World Wide Web. (The Help files are included with HP TopTools for Hubs & Switches, and are also automatically available from e HP via the World Wide Web.) c a f r e t Retrieval of the Help files is controlled by automatic entries to the Management n I Server URL field on the Configuration / Support/Mgmt URLs screen, shown in figure 4-6. The switch is shipped with the URL set to retrieve online Help from the HP World Wide Web site. However, if HP TopTools for Hubs & Switches is installed on a management station on your network and discovers the switch, the Management Server URL is automatically changed to retrieve the Help from your TopTools management station. If Online Help Fails To Operate. Do one of the following: ■ If HP TopTools for Hubs & Switches is installed and running on your network, enter the IP address or DNS name of the network management station in the Management Server URL field shown in figure 4-7 on page 4-15.

4-14 Using the HP Web Browser Interface Support/Mgmt URLs Feature ■ If you have World Wide Web access from your PC or workstation, and do not have HP TopTools installed on your network, enter the following URL in the Management Server URL field shown in figure 4-7 on page 4-15: hp.com/rnd/device_help Enter IP address of HP TopTools network management station, or URL of location of help files on HP’s World Wide Web site here. U s Figure 4-7. How To Access Web Browser Interface Online Help i n g t h e Policy Management and Configuration. HP Top Tools for Hubs & I n H t Switches can perform network-wide policy management and configuration of P e r W f your switch. The Management Server URL field identifies the management a e c e b station that is performing that function. For more information, refer to the B r documentation provided on the HP TopTools for Hubs & Switches CD shipped o w with the switch. s e r 4-15 Using the HP Web Browser Interface Status Reporting Features Status Reporting Features Browser elements covered in this section include: ■ The Overview window (below) ■ Port utilization and status (page ) ■ The Alert log (page ) ■ The Status bar (page ) The Overview Window The Overview Window is the home screen for any entry into the web browser interface.The following figure identifies the various parts of the screen.

r e s w o r B be W P H e h t g n is U e c a fr e t n I Status Bar (page 4-23) Tab Bar Button Bar Port Utiliza tion Graphs (page 4-17) Port Status Indicators (page 4-19) Alert Log (page 4-20) Alert Log Control Bar Active Button Active Tab Figure 4-8. The Overview Window

4-16 Using the HP Web Browser Interface Status Reporting Features The Port Utilization and Status Displays The Port Utilization and Status displays show an overview of the status of the switch and the amount of network activity on each port. The following figure shows a sample reading of the Port Utilization and Port Status. Bandwidth Display Control Port Utilization Bar Graphs

Port Status Indicators Figure 4-9. The Graphs Area Port Utilization Legend

The Port Utilization bar graphs show the network traffic on the port with a breakdown of the packet types that have been detected (unicast packets, non unicast packets, and error packets). The Legend identifies traffic types and their associated colors on the bar graph: U s i ■ % Unicast Rx & All Tx: This is all unicast traffic received and all n g transmitted traffic of any type. This indicator (a blue color on many t h e systems) can signify either transmitted or received traffic. I n H t P e ■ % Non-Unicast Pkts Rx: All multicast and broadcast traffic received by r W f a e c the port. This indicator (a gold color on many systems) enables you to e b know “at-a-glance” the source of any non-unicast traffic that is causing B r o high utilization of the switch. For example, if one port is receiving heavy w s broadcast or multicast traffic, all ports will become highly utilized. By e r color-coding the received broadcast and multicast utilization, the bar graph quickly and easily identifies the offending port. This makes it faster and easier to discover the exact source of the heavy traffic because you don’t have to examine port counter data from several ports. ■ % Error Pkts Rx: All error packets received by the port. (This indicator is a reddish color on many systems.) Although errors received on a port are not propagated to the rest of the network, a consistently high number of errors on a specific port may indicate a problem on the device or network segment connected to the indicated port. 4-17

r e s w o r B be W P H e h t g n is U Using the HP Web Browser Interface Status Reporting Features ■ Maximum Activity Indicator: As the bars in the graph area change height to reflect the level of network activity on the corresponding port, they leave an outline to identify the maximum activity level that has been observed on the port. Utilization Guideline. A network utilization of 40% is considered the maximum that a typical Ethernet-type network can experience before encoun tering performance difficulties. If you observe utilization that is consistently higher than 40% on any port, click on the Port Counters button to get a detailed set of counters for the port. To change the amount of bandwidth the Port Utilization bar graph shows. Click on the bandwidth display control button in the upper left corner of the graph. (The button shows the current scale setting, such as 40%.) In the resulting menu, select the bandwidth scale you want the graph to show (3%, 10%, 25%, 40%, 75%, or 100%), as shown in figure 3-7. Note that when viewing activity on a gigabit port, you may want to select a lower value (such as 3% or 10%). This is because the bandwidth utilization of current network applications on gigabit links is typically minimal, and may not appear on the graph if the scale is set to show high bandwidth utilization. e c Figure 4-10. Changing the Graph Area Scale a f r e t n I To display values for each graph bar. Hold the mouse cursor over any of the bars in the graph, and a pop-up display is activated showing the port identification and numerical values for each of the sections of the bar, as shown in figure 4-11 (next). Figure 4-11. Display of Numerical Values for the Bar

4-18 Using the HP Web Browser Interface Status Reporting Features Port Status Port Status IndicatorsLegend Figure 4-12. The Port Status Indicators and Legend The Port Status indicators show a symbol for each port that indicates the general status of the port. There are four possible statuses: ■ Port Connected – the port is enabled and is properly connected to an active network device. ■ Port Not Connected – the port is enabled but is not connected to an active network device. A cable may not be connected to the port, or the device at the other end may be powered off or inoperable, or the cable or connected device could be faulty. ■ Port Disabled – the port has been configured as disabled through the web browser interface, the switch console, or SNMP network manage U ment. s i n ■ Port Fault-Disabled – a fault condition has occurred on the port that g t has caused it to be auto-disabled. Note that the Port Fault-Disabled h e I n symbol will be displayed in the legend only if one or more of the ports is H t P e in that status. See chapter 7, “Monitoring and Analyzing Switch Operation” r W f a e c for more information. e b B r o w s e r 4-19

r e s w o r B be W P H e h t g n is U Using the HP Web Browser Interface Status Reporting Features The Alert Log The web browser interface Alert Log, shown in the lower half of the screen, shows a list of network occurrences, or alerts, that were detected by the switch. Typical alerts are Broadcast Storm, indicating an excessive number of broadcasts received on a port, and Problem Cable, indicating a faulty cable. A full list of alerts is shown in the table on page 4-21. Figure 4-13. Example of the Alert Log Each alert has the following fields of information: ■ Status – The level of severity of the event generated. Severity levels can be Information, Normal, Warning, and Critical. If the alert is new (has not yet been acknowledged), the New symbol is also in the Status column. ■ Alert – The specific event identification. ■ Date/Time – The date and time the event was received by the web browser interface. This value is shown in the format: DD-MM-YY HH:MM:SS AM/PM, for example, 16-Sep-99 7:58:44 AM. e c ■ Description – A short narrative statement that describes the event. For a f r e example, Excessive CRC/Alignment errors on port: 8. t n I Sorting the Alert Log Entries The alerts are sorted, by default, by the Date/Time field with the most recent alert listed at the top of the list. The second most recent alert is displayed below the top alert and so on. If alerts occurred at the same time, the simultaneous alerts are sorted by order in which they appear in the MIB. The alert field that is being used to sort the alert log is indicated by which column heading is in bold. You can sort by any of the other columns by clicking on the column heading. The Alert and Description columns are sorted alpha betically, while the Status column is sorted by severity type, with more critical severity indicators appearing above less critical indicators.

4-20 Using the HP Web Browser Interface Status Reporting Features Alert Types The following table lists the types of alerts that can be generated. Table 4-2. Alert Strings and Descriptions Alert String Alert Description First Time Install Important installation information for your switch.

Too many undersized/ giant packets A device connected to this port is transmitting packets shorter than 64 bytes or longer than 1518 bytes (longer than 1522 bytes if tagged), with valid CRCs (unlike runts, which have invalid CRCs).

Excessive jabbering A device connected to this port is incessantly transmitting packets (“jabbering”), detected as oversized packets with CRC errors.

Excessive CRC/alignment errors A high percentage of data errors has been detected on this port. Possible causes include: • Faulty cabling or invalid topology. • Duplex mismatch (full-duplex configured on one end of the link, half-duplex configured on the other) • A malfunctioning NIC, NIC driver, or transceiver

Excessive late collisions Late collisions (collisions detected after transmitting 64 bytes) have been detected on this port. Possible causes include: • An overextended LAN topology • Duplex mismatch (full-duplex configured on one end of the link, half-duplex configured on the other) • A misconfigured or faulty device connected to the port U s i n High collision or drop rate A large number of collisions or packet drops have occurred on the port. Possible causes g include: t h e • A extremely high level of traffic on the port I n H t P e • Duplex mismatch r W f a • A misconfigured or malfunctioning NIC or transceiver on a device connected to this port e c e b • A topology loop in the network B r o w Excessive broadcasts An extremely high percentage of broadcasts was received on this port. This degrades the s performance of all devices connected to the port. Possible causes include: e r • A network topology loop—this is the usual cause • A malfunctioning device, NIC, NIC driver, or software package Network Loop Network loop has been detected by the switch. Loss of Link Lost connection to one or multiple devices on the port. Loss of stack member The Commander has lost the connection to a stack member. Security violation A security violation has occurred. 4-21

r e s w o r B be W P H e h t g n is U Using the HP Web Browser Interface Status Reporting Features Note When troubleshooting the sources of alerts, it may be helpful to check the switch’s Port Status and Port Counter windows and the Event Log in the console interface. Viewing Detail Views of Alert Log Entries By double clicking on Alert Entries, the web browser interface displays a Detail View or separate window detailing information about the events. The Detail View contains a description of the problem and a possible solution. It also provides four management buttons: ■ Acknowledge Event – removes the New symbol from the log entry ■ Delete Event – removes the alert from the Alert Log ■ Cancel Button – closes the detail view with no change to the status of the alert and returns you to the Overview screen. A sample Detail View describing an Excessive CRC/Alignment Error alert is shown here. e c a f r e t n I Figure 4-14. Example of Alert Log Detail View

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