ACER ASPIRE 3 A317-51 (01) PDF MANUAL



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ACER ASPIRE 3 A317-32 (01) PDF MANUAL



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ACCUENERGY ACUDC 243 (01) PDF MANUAL


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PDF Content Summary: ACUDC 240 D C P O W E R & E N E R G Y M E T E R AcuDC 240 Series Power and Energy Meter User's Manual II PLEASE NOTE This manual may not be altered or reproduced in whole or in part by any means without the expressed written consent of ACCUENERGY. The information contained in this document is believed to be accurate at the time of publication, however, ACCUENERGY assumes no responsibility for any errors which may appear here and reserves the right to make changes without notice. Please ask the local representative for latest product specifications before ordering (contact information please see the following page). Windows®, Windows® Vista, Windows® 7, Windows® 8, and Windows® XP are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. CUSTOMER SERVICE AND SUPPORT ACCUENERGY provides technical support Monday through Friday between 8:30AM and 5:00PM (EST). However, this manual provides a trouble shooting section in the Appendix that may provide a quicker solution than over the phone consultation. You can contact ACCUENERGY for support at: TF: 1-877-721-8908 INT: +1-416-497-4100 E: support@accuenergy.com When contacting ACCUENERGY please have the following prepared: / Meter’s part number + serial number (Both found on a sticker at the side of the meter)Multiple CT Input Options compatible with any CT: 5A/1A, 333mV, Flexible Rogowski Coil, 80/100/200mA / Hardware Version + Firmware Version(Refer to the Appendix C, ordering information) / A detailed problem description. PRODUCT WARRANTY ACCUENERGY provides a 5 year limited warranty for its products. 1. The warranty strictly covers manufacturing defects in material and workmanship in products bought with in United States and Canada. The warranty is valid from the date of purchase by the original purchaser and for a period of 60 months.Hardware Version + Firmware Version(Refer to the Appendix C, ordering information) 2. Exclusions: a) Damage or failure caused by abuse, misuse, faulty installation and operation, improper or inadequate maintenance, and any repair or guarantee on repairs not carried out by ACCUENERGY. b) Damage resulting from inadequate packaging or carrier mishandling of returned products. c) All products purchased outside United States of American and Canada. 3. It is original purchaser’s responsibility to provide a dated proof of purchase. The warranty is not transferable. 4. ACCUENERGY will at its sole discretion repair or exchange a product under warranty. No credit will be issued. 5. THE WARRANTY IS VOID WHEN: a) The product serial number has been altered or removed. b) The product has been altered, service or manipulated by anyone other than ACCUENERGY or without the prior written authorization of ACCUENERGY. 6. All shipping charges must be pre-paid by the sender. ACCUENERGY will, at its own expense, ship back the warranted repaired product to the sender anywhere within the United States and Canada. We will ship best way at our discretion. 7. To secure your warranty coverage, contact ACCUENERGY to obtain the registration card that must be filled out and sent or faxed back to ACCUENERGY with a copy of a dated proof of purchase. Products under warranty receive priority for repairs. III IV ABOUT ACCUENERGY Formed in 1998, Accuenergy is a leading producer of power and energy metering products for the distribution, control and management of electrical energy and other dynamic processes. Accuenergy’s vision is to make energy usage more dependable and efficient, and to make energy management more convenient and intelligent. Accuenergy products are easily integrated into new and existing energy management, automation and building control systems for intelligent and user-friendly energy systems and are backed by an industry-leading pre and post sale technical support and manufacturer’s warranty. With an emphasis on continuous improvement, innovation and high performance and cost-effective solutions, Accuenergy has developed a growing global footprint with offices in Toronto Canada (Headquarter), Los Angeles and Beijing. WARNINGS GLOSSARY The following symbols in this manual and on AcuDC 240 series meters are used to provide warning of danger or risk during the installation and operation of the meters. Electric Shock Symbol: Carries information about procedures which must be followed to reduce the risk of electric shock and danger to personal health. When this symbol is seen on the meter, consult this user manual. Refer to Chapter 2 for important safety information regarding mounting and wiring of the AcuDC meter. Safety Alert Symbol: Carries information about circumstances which if not considered may result in injury or death. Note: Please read this manual carefully before installation, operation and maintenance of an AcuDC 240 series meter. Installation and maintenance of the AcuDC 240 meter should only be performed by qualified, competent professionals who have received training and should have experience with high voltage and current devices. ACCUENERGY shall not be responsible or liable for any damages caused by improper meter installation and/or operation. TABLE OF CONTENTS CUSTOMER SERVICE AND SUPPORT .....................................................................II PRODUCT WARRANTY .................................................................................................III CHAPTER 1: Introduction to the AcuDC ................................................................1 1.1 Package Contents & Available Accessories ..............................................1 1.2 Introduction and Compliance ......................................................................1 1.2.1 Introduction ........................................................................................................................1 1.2.2 Compliance ........................................................................................................................2 1.3 Applications & Industries ................................................................................2 1.4 Features & Specifications ...............................................................................3 1.4.1 Features .................................................................................................................................3 1.4.2 Specifications ....................................................................................................................3 CHAPTER 2: Installation - Physical Setup............................................................7 2.1 Tools .........................................................................................................................7 2.1.1 Tools for Mounting ..........................................................................................................7 2.1.2 Tools for Wiring ................................................................................................................7 2.2 Mounting ..............................................................................................................7 2.2.1 Tools for Mounting..........................................................................................................8 2.2.2 Mounting I/O Modules Onto Meter ......................................................................9 2.3 Wiring .......................................................................................................................................12 2.3.1 Wiring Control Power ....................................................................................................13 2.3.2 Current Input Wiring ....................................................................................................14 2.3.3 Voltage Input Wiring ....................................................................................................16 2.3.4 Current & Voltage Wiring at the Same Time ...................................................17 2.3.5 Communications Wiring .............................................................................................20 2.4 Removing meter for servicing or maintenance ...................................21 CHAPTER 3: Installation - Configuration Parameter Set-up via display .............24 3.1 Display Panel and Keys ....................................................................................24 3.2 General Parameter Setup ...............................................................................25 3.2.1 Key’s Function in parameters setup .....................................................................26 3.2.2 Configure AcuDC to work with Shunt.................................................................26 3.2.3 Configure AcuDC to work with Current Hall Effect Sensor .....................27 3.2.4 Configure AcuDC to work with Current and Voltage Hall Effect Sensor 283.2.5 Clear Energy, Ah and DI Counter ...........................................................................29 V VI 3.2.6 Set Backlight Brightness ............................................................................................30 3.2.7 Meter Clock Setting ......................................................................................................30 3.2.8 Password Setting ............................................................................................................31 3.3 AcuDC Communication Setup .....................................................................31 3.4 I/O Parameter Setup.........................................................................................32 3.4.1 Meter Clock Setting .......................................................................................................32 3.4.2 RO parameter setting ..................................................................................................34 CHAPTER 4: Viewing Metering Parameters – VIA Display ............................40 4.1 General Display on the AcuDC ......................................................................40 4.2 View the Meter and Load Running Time .................................................43 4.3 View the serial number from the meter ..................................................44 CHAPTER 5: Viewing Real-time Readings Via AcuView Software ...........46 5.1 Connection Setup ..............................................................................................46 5.1.1 Wiring .....................................................................................................................................46 5.1.2 Acuview Software Setup .............................................................................................46 5.2 Configuration Parameters Setup ................................................................49 5.2.1 General Meter Parameter Setting ..........................................................................49 5.2.2 Configure the Data Log using the meter’s onboard memory ...............51 5.2.3 Configure the data log to log the readings on the computer’s memory 53 5.3 Viewing Metering Parameters ......................................................................56 5.3.1 Real-Time Metering .......................................................................................................56 5.3.2 Reading Data Log on Meter’s Onboard Memory ..........................................57 5.3.3 Reading Data Log on the computer’s memory .............................................58 APPENDIX ..........................................................................................................................60 A. Troubleshooting ..................................................................................................60 B. Modbus Register Map ........................................................................................63 B.1 MODBUS-RTU Protocol ...................................................................................................63 B.2 Communication Format ................................................................................................66 B.3 AcuDC240 Communication Address Table .........................................................71 C. Ordering Information ........................................................................................83 D. Glossary of Definitions ......................................................................................84 AcuDC 240 Series DC Power and Energy Meters Chapter 1: Introduction to AcuDC 1.1 Package Contents + Available Accessories 1.2 Introduction and Compliance 1.2.1 Introduction 1.2.2 Compliance 1.3 Applications & Industries 1.4 Features & Specifications 1.4.1 Features 1.4.2 Specifications Chapter 1: Introduction to AcuDC CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION TO THE ACUDC 1.1 Package Contents & Available Accessories When you open the package, you will find the following items: 1. AcuDC 240 Meter X1 2. Terminal Blocks X1 - X3 (Depending on model) 3. Installation Clips X4 (Already assembled to the meter) Available Accessories: I/O modules (Combinations of digital I/O, analog I/O and relay output) Current transformers USB to Serial Converters 1.2 Introduction and Compliance 1.2.1 Introduction Powerful Yet Cost-Effective AcuDC 240 series monitors DC voltage, current, power and energy. It supports bi- directional current measurement, and also displays meter running hour and load running hour. Analog Output applies to DCS system, industrial monitoring and control. AcuDC 240 has a combination of accurate measurement, intelligent multifunction and simple human machine interface. The cost-effective meter fulfills the requirements of monitoring and controlling the DC circuit. Compact and Easy to Install The dimensions of AcuDC 240 series meet DIN 72X72 requirements. With a mounting depth of 65mm, the meter can even fit in small drawer type cabinets. It utilizes a self-lock installation mechanism, eliminating the necessary of fix bolts, which makes installation or removal quick and convenient. User Friendly Interface AcuDC 240 series utilizes a clear high-definition LCD screen with large characters. The LCD screen comes with a brightness adjustable backlight, which ensures easy observation of metering data in any environment. With a large LCD screen display, the two keys on the meter from allow users to observe multiple parameter data at the same time. The meter parameter settings can be set either via front panel keys or the communication port. The Parameter settings are saved in the non-volatile EEPROM, which remains when power is off. accuenergy.com

V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 1 AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters

High Safety and Reliability AcuDC 240 series meter was designed according to industrial standards. It can run reliably under high power disturbance conditions. This meter has been fully tested for EMC and safety compliance in accordance with multiple international standards. The casing is highly fire resistant due to high quality, durable engineering plastics. 1.2.2 Compliance The following table lists the compliances this meter meets:

Safety Conforms to UL Std 61010-1 Certified to CSA Std C22/2 No. 61010-1 CE certified. Quality Control Certified to ISO 9001:2008 standard Environmental IEC 60068-2; Nema3 Certified IP54 Certified 1.3 Applications & Industries Applications: / DC meter & metering Metering of DC consumption and generation of different DC electrical systems / DC transducer Installed transducer reads power, energy, voltage, current and amp hour data and outputs digital pulse and/or analog signals / DC data logger / data logging Installed meter reads, records and stores power, energy, voltage, current and amp hour data for subsequent download, reporting and analysis Industries: / Renewable energy & green systems Generation by solar photovoltaic (PV) arrays, wind turbines, inverter & battery monitoring, DC consumption of electric vehicle (EV) charging stations / Transportation Systems Consumption of rail / railway, subway and trains and transit systems and related DC equipment / Telecommunications Consumption on cell / cellular towers and equipment / Datacenters Consumption of data centers and equipment 2 V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 accuenergy.com

Chapter 1: Introduction to AcuDC 1.4 Features & Specifications 1.4.1 Features DC power system metering; Monitor and control power switches; Alarming and analog output; Standard 72x72mm, allows for drawer type panel installation; Three line high-definition LCD display; Accessible with SCADA, PLC systems; Easy installation, simple wiring; Data Logging: Offers 3 configurable historical logs where the all of the metering parameters can be recorded. The onboard memory is up to 4 MB and each log size is adjustable. 1.4.2 Specifications The following tables list the specifications of AcuDC 240 meter. Parameter Accuracy Resolution Range Voltage 0.2% 0.001 V 0~1200 V Current 0.2% 0.001 A 0~±50000 A Power 0.5% 0.001 kW 0~±60000 kW Energy 0.5% 0.01 kWh 0~9999999.99 kWh Drift with Temperature <100ppm / °C Stability 0.5‰/year Voltage Input Range Voltage Direct Input0~1000V; Via Hall Effect Sensor0~1200V Input Impedance 2MΩ Load <0.6W Accuracy 0.2% accuenergy.com

V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 3

AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters Voltage Current 0~±10A(Direct Input, pick up current 0.01A) Input Range 0~±50000A(Via Shunt or Hall Effect Sensor, program- mable range) Shunt 50~100mV(programmable) Hall Effect Sensor 0~±5V/0-±4V, 4~20mA/12mA±8mA Power Consumption 2W(MAX) Accuracy 0.2% Digital Input Type Dry Contact Isolation Voltage 2500Vac Environment Operation Temperature -25°C ~ +70°C Storage Temperature -40°C ~ +85°C Humidity 5%~95%Non-condensing Output Relay Output (RO) Type Mechanical contact, Form A Max Load Voltage 250Vac/30Vdc Max Load Current 3A On Resistance 100mΩ (Max) Isolation Voltage 4000Vac Mechanical Life 5 × 106 times Digital Output (Photo-Mos) Load Voltage Range 0~250Vac/dc Load Current 100mA(Max) Max Output Frequency 25Hz, 50% duty cycle Isolation Voltage 2500Vac Analog Output (AO) Load Voltage Range 4-20mA/0~20mA; 0~5V/1-5V Load Current 0.5% Max Output Frequency Current type, max load resistance: 750 Ohm Voltage type, max load current: 20 mA 4 V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 accuenergy.com

Chapter 1: Introduction to AcuDC accuenergy.com Communication Type RS485, half duplex, Optical Isolated Protocol Modbus-RTU Baud Rate 1200~38400bps Isolation Voltage 2500VAC Power Relay Supply Input (P1)100-240Vac, 50/60Hz, 100-300Vdc (P2) 20-60Vdc Consumption 3W (typical value) Installation 72 x 72 mm Panel mounted Table 1-3 lists the functions of AcuDC240 series. Table 1-3 AcuDC 240 Series Function AcuDC 241 AcuDC 242 AcuDC 243 Metering Voltage V / / Current I / / Power P / Energy E / Ampere -Hour Ah / I/O ○ ○ ○ 2DI+2RO ○ ○ ○ 2DI+2DO ○ ○ ○ 2DI+ ±15Vdc ○ ○ ○ Data Logging 2DI+2AO Support DI Count All metering parameters can be recorded (Voltage, Current, Power, Energy, Ampere-hour, DI Count); Interval 1 minute; Can record 4 months ○ Communication RS485, Modbus RTU ○ ○ ○ Display LCD / / / Dimensions 72×72×64.5mm (Cutout: 68x68 mm) / 2.835 x 2.835 x 2.539 inch (Cutout: 2.677 x 2.677 inch) V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 5

AcuDC 240 Series DC Power and Energy Meters Chapter 2: Installation - Physical Setup 2.1 Tools 2.1.1 Tools for Mounting 2.1.2 Tools for Wiring 2.2 Mounting 2.2.1 How to choose installation place 2.2.2 Mounting I/O modules onto meter 2.2.3 Mounting meter onto switchboard panel 2.3 Wiring 2.3.1 Wiring Control Power 2.3.2 Current input wiring 2.3.3 Voltage input wiring 2.3.4 Current & Voltage wiring at the same time 2.3.5 I/O Module wiring 2.3.6 Communications wiring 2.4 Removing meter for servicing or maintenance accuenergy.com Chapter 2: Installation - Physical Setup CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION - PHYSICAL SETUP 2.1 Tools 2.1.1 Tools for Mounting / #2 Flathead Screwdriver / Wire Cutters 2.1.2 Tools for Wiring / A 1A/250Vac circuit breaker for the auxiliary power supply loopWire Cutters / A 1A/250Vac circuit breaker should be used in the voltage input loop. / Choice of wire of power supply is AWG22-16 or 0.6-1.5mm2 / The wire for voltage input is AWG16-12 or 1.3-2.0mm2 / The wire size of current input is AWG15-10 or 1.5-2.5mm2 The following may be required: / If using RS485 for communication, use a good quality shielded twisted pair cable, AWG22 (0.5mm2) or higher / The wire of digital input should be chosen between AWG22~16 or 0.5~ 1.3mm2 / The wire of relay output should be chosen between AWG22~16 or 0.5~1.3mm2 / The wire of the digital output circuit should be chosen between AWG22~16 or 0.5~1.3 mm2 2.2 Mounting Considerations When Installing Meters / Installation of the meter must be performed by qualified personnel only, and should follow standard safety precautions through the installation procedures. Those personnel should have appropriate training and experience with high voltage devices. Appropriate safety gloves, safety glasses and protective clothing are recommended. / During normal operation, dangerous voltage may be present in many parts of the meter, including terminals, and any connected I/O (Inputs and Outputs) modules and their circuits. All primary and secondary circuits can, at times, produce lethal voltages. AVOID contact with any current-carrying surfaces. / The meter and its I/O output channels are NOT designed as primary protection devices and shall NOT be used as primary circuit protection or in an energy limiting capacity. The meter and its I/O output channels can only be used as secondary protection. AVOID using the meter under situations where failure of the meter may cause injury or death. AVOID using the meter for any application where risk of fire may occur. V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 7 V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 8AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters / All meter terminals should be inaccessible after installation. / Applying more than the maximum voltage the meter and/or its modules can withstand will permanently damage the meter and/or its modules. Please refer to the specifications in section 1.4.1 for all devices before applying voltages. NOTE: If the equipment is used in a manner not specified by the manufacturer, the protection provided by the equipment may be impaired. NOTE: There is no required preventive maintenance or inspection necessary for safety. However, any repair or maintenance should be performed by the factory. DISCONNECT DEVICE: The following part is considered the equipment disconnect device. A switch or circuit- breaker shall be included in the installation. The switch shall be in close proximity to the equipment and within easy reach of the operator. The switch shall be marked as the disconnecting device for the equipment. 2.2.1 Tools for Mounting Note: Before installation, please check the environment, temperature and humidity to ensure the AcuDC 240 series meter is being placed in a proper place. 1. Temperature AcuDC 240 operation temperature is -25°C ~ 70°C, which will accommodate most user applications. If a special temperature range is needed, please contact Accuenergy. Please Note: It can influence the meter life negatively if the meter operates under extremely high or extremely low temperature environments. AcuDC 240 storage temperature is -40°C ~ 85°C. 2. Humidity 5% to 95% non-condensing 3. Location AcuDC 240 series meter should be installed in a dry and dust free environment. Avoid exposing meter to excessive heat, radiation and high electrical noise sources. Alert Alert Alert accuenergy.com accuenergy.com Chapter 2: Installation - Physical Setup 2.2.2 Mounting I/O Modules Onto Meter If the meter is equipped with an I/O module, you need to mount the module onto meter before installing the meter. Installation Method With the link pins, I/O module is linked to the meter. 1. Insert the mounting clips to the counterpart of AcuDC 240 meter, and then press the I/O module lightly, so linking is established, as shown in Fig 2-2.

(A) (C) (B) (D) V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 9

V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters 2. Tighten the installation screws. Note: Install I/O Module carefully to avoid damage; under no circumstances should any installation be done with the meter powered on. Failure to do so may result in injury or death. 2.2.3 Mounting Meter Onto Switchboard Panel Appearance and DimensionsFig 2-3 AcuDC 240 Appearance Part Description 1. Casing High intensity fire resistant engineering plastics 2. Front Casing Visible portion after mounting onto a panel 3. Display Large LCD display 4. Key Two keys are used to select display and set 5. Voltage and Current Input Terminals Used for voltage and current input 6. Communication Terminals Communication output 7. I/O Module Optional I/O module 8. I/O Terminal Optional I/O terminals, including 2DI, 2AO/2RO 9. Power Supply Terminal Power supply terminal 10. Installation Clips Used for securing the meter to the panel 101.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 Table 2-1 Part Name of AcuDC 240 Fig 2-4 AcuDC 240 Dimensions accuenergy.com

accuenergy.com Chapter 2: Installation - Physical Setup Installation Steps AcuDC 240 series meter is generally installed into the switchboard panel. 1. Cut a square hole (Standard DIN). See figure 2-5 for dimensions. Unit:mm 2. Remove the clips (10) from the meter, and insert the meter into the square hole from the front side, as shown in following figures. Fig 2-5 Panel Cutout

a. Panel Cutout c. Putting back the Clips at the back of the Panel b. Inserting the Meter to the Panel Square Hole d. Installation Completed V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 11

V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters 2.3 Wiring Terminal Strips There are 3 groups of current terminal strips. There will be another terminal strip if the meter is connected with the I/O module. a. Voltage and Current Terminal Strip c. I/O Terminal Strip (2DI+2AO) e. I/O Terminal Strip (2DI+±15V) Safety Earth Connection Before setting up the meter’s wiring, please make sure that the switchgear has an earth ground terminal. Connect both the meters and the switchgear’s ground terminal together. This ground terminal symbol is used in this user’s manual. 121.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 Fig 2-7 AcuDC 240 Terminal Strip b. Power Supply Terminal Strip d. I/O Terminal Strip(2DI+2RO/2DO) f. Communication Terminal Strip accuenergy.com

accuenergy.com Chapter 2: Installation - Physical Setup 2.3.1 Wiring Control Power CAUTION: Make sure you check the power supply option you have before energizing the meter. Check the silver sticker on the side of the meter to confirm what power supply option you have. The silver sticker on the side of the meter contains information such as the model number, power supply, voltage/current inputs and serial number. To power the meter, you need to connect the power supply terminal as shown below. This will be connected based on the two power supply options available, that is:

1A FUSE 11L/+Power Supply 12N/- AcuDC 240 13 G

Fig 2-9 Power Supply Wiring 1. The Standard option: 100-240Vac, 50/60Hz or 100-300Vdc 2. The Low Voltage DC option: 20-60Vdc The independent power supply circuit loop must have a fuse or air circuit breaker. The fuse could be 1A/250Vac, time delay type. If circuit breaker is used, a CE certified product with compliance of IEC947 is recommended. Terminal G (13) must be connected to the ground for the safety. An isolated transformer or EMC filter should be used in the auxiliary power supply loop if power quality problem exists in the power supply, as shown in following figure.

1A FUSE LL11L/+Power Supply NN12N/- AcuDC 240 G G 13 13 G G G

EMC filter 2-10 Power Supply Wiring with EMC Filter Choice of wire power supply is AWG16-22 or 0.6-1.5 mm2. V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 13 V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters 2.3.2 Current Input Wiring AcuDC 240 meter current can be wired in three different ways: direct wiring, wiring using a shunt and wiring using a current Hall Effect sensor. NOTE: When wiring using a shunt or Hall Effect Sensor these must be wired on the negative terminal of the load that is being measured. Choice of wire current input is AWG15-16 or 1.5-2.5 mm2 or equivalent resistance wire. Fig 2-11a Wiring using a Shunt Fig 2-11b Direct Wiring 141.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 Vdc- Vdc+ Meter I/O terminal strip 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 DI11 DI12 DI21 DI22 NC V- GND V+ shunt Voltage, Current, Terminal Strip 6 45 23 1 I- I+ NC U- NC U+ Load I- I+ NC U- NC U+ Vdc- Vdc+ Meter I/O terminal strip 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 DI11 DI12 DI21 DI22 NC V- GND V+ Voltage, Current, Terminal Strip 123456 Load accuenergy.com accuenergy.com Chapter 2: Installation - Physical Setup Current Hall E ect Sensor Terminal I- I+ NC U- NC U+ Vdc- Vdc+ Meter Hall E ect Sensor I/O terminal strip 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 DI11 DI12 DI21 DI22 NC V- GND V+ 1Voltage, Current, Terminal Strip 2 3123456 4Load Fig 2-11 C Wiring using a Hall Effect Sensor Fig 2-11 Current Input Wiring Table 2-2 Accuenergy Line of Shunts/Hall Effect Sensors for Measuring Current Shunt (Works with AcuDC 243 A1 Current Input Option) NOTE: For measuring higher currents or larger window size openings, please contact Accuenergy’s Sales team. Hall Effect Sensor (Works with AcuDC 243 A2 Current Input Option) Rated Input: 50A Output: 75mV Rated Input: 50A Output: 4-20mA Window Size: 21mm Rated Input: 100A Output: 75mV Rated Input: 100A Output: 4-20mA Window Size: 21mm Rated Input: 200A Output: 75mV Rated Input: 200A Output: 4-20mA Window Size: 21mm Rated Input: 500A Output: 75mV Rated Input: 400A Output: 4-20mA Window Size: 40mm Rated Input: 1000A Output: 75mV Rated Input: 600A Output: 4-20mA Window Size: 40mm Rated Input: 1500A Output: 75mV Rated Input: 1000A Output: 4-20mA Window Size: 40mm Rated Input: 2000A Output: 75mV V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 15 V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters 2.3.3 Voltage Input Wiring AcuDC 240 series meter Voltage can be wired in two different ways: direct wiring and wiring using a voltage Hall Effect sensor. Choice of wire for the voltage input is AWG16-22 or 0.6~1.5 mm2. Please see the wiring diagrams for details as shown in fig 2-12. I- I+ NC U- NC U+ Fig 2-12a Wiring using a Voltage Hall Effect Sensor Fig2-12b-Direct Wiring Fig2-12-Voltage Input Wiring 161.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 Vdc- Vdc+ Meter I/O terminal strip Hall E ect Sensor 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 DI11 DI12 DI21 DI22 NC V- GND V+ + Voltage, Current, Terminal Strip -IN- MIN+ 123456 TMeter Voltage, Current, Terminal Strip I- I+ NC U- NC U+ Vdc- Vdc+ I/O terminal strip 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 DI11 DI12 DI21 DI22 NC V- GND V+ 6 5 4 3 2 1 Load accuenergy.com accuenergy.com Chapter 2: Installation - Physical Setup 2.3.4 Current & Voltage Wiring at the Same Time You can wire the voltage and current for different systems based on the different methods above. Here are the common wiring methods used: 1. Direct voltage connection and a direct current connection see 2-13a. 2. Direct voltage connection and a current connection using a shunt see 2-13b. 3. Direct voltage connection and a current connection using a current Hall Effect sensor see 2-13c. The different wiring diagrams are shown below: Meter Vdc- Vdc+ I/O terminal strip 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 DI11 DI12 DI21 DI22 NC V- GND V+ Voltage, Current, Terminal Strip 123456 I- I+ NC U- NC U+ Load Fig 2-13a Direct Wiring Vdc- Vdc+ Meter I/O terminal strip 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 DI11 DI12 DI21 DI22 NC V- GND V+ shunt Voltage, Current, Terminal Strip 6 5 4 23 1 I- I+ NC U- NC U+ Load Fig 2-13b Voltage and Current Wiring Using a Shunt V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 17 V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters Fig 2-13c Voltage and Current Wiring Using Current Hall Effect Sensor Fig 2-13 d Voltage and Current Wiring Using Hall Effect Sensors Fig 2-13-Typical Voltage and Current wiring diagram for systems 181.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 Vdc- Vdc+ Meter Hall E ect Sensor I/O terminal strip 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 DI11 DI12 DI21 DI22 NC V- GND V+ 1Voltage, Current, Terminal Strip 236 2345 1 4I- I+ NC U- NC U+ Load IN+ Hall E ect Sensor Vdc- Vdc+ Meter Voltage Hall E ect Sensors + I/O terminal strip -IN- 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 MTDI11 DI12 DI21 DI22 NC V- GND V+ 1Voltage, Current, Terminal Strip 2 3123456 4I- I+ NC U- NC U+ Current Hall E ect Sensors Load accuenergy.com accuenergy.com Digital Input AcuDC 240 optional I/O module is equipped with two dry contact digital inputs. The terminals are (17), (18), (19) and (20), as shown in figure 2-7. The Circuit is simplified as: When the switch is open, there is no current flowing into the diode side of the optical coupler, the triode is off, OUT is in low state. When the switch is closed, there is current flowing into the diode side, the triode is on, OUT is in high state. In this way, the ‘high’ and ‘low’ state of OUT corresponding to ‘closed’ and ‘’open’ state of the switch. The I/O module has built in power supply therefore the digital input does not require an external power supply. DI wire may choose AWG22-16 or 0.5-1.5 mm2. Analog Output AcuDC 240 I/O module offers two Analog Output modes, which are the current output 0-20mA/4-20mA(max 24mA) mode, and the voltage output 0-5V/1-5V(max 6V) mode, as shown in figure 2-15. NOTE: Each module can only has one type of output, please specify when ordering. Fig 2-15 Analog Output Wiring Chapter 2: Installation - Physical Setup V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 19 V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters Relay Output The AcuDC 240 series I/O option has two relay outputs, which are terminal (21), (22) and (23), (24) as shown in Fig 2-7. They can be used to remotely control circuit breakers. The relay outputs are form A (normally open) electromagnetic relay. The nodal capacity is 3A/250 Vac or 3A/30Vdc. If the coil current is high, a medium relay is recommended. 2.3.5 Communications Wiring AcuDC 240 series meter uses RS485 serial communication and the Modbus RTU protocol. The terminals of communication are A, B and S (14, 15 and 16). A is differential signal +, B is differential -, and S is connected to the shield of twisted pair cable. The overall length of the RS485 cable connecting all devices cannot exceed 1200m (4000ft). Utilizing a large number of RS485 devices and utilizing a high baud rate will make the communication range shorter. AcuDC 240 works as a Slave device. Master device can be PC, PLC, Data Acquisition Device, or RTU. Suggestions to improve communication quality: A high-quality Shielded Twisted Pair cable, AWG22(0.6mm2) or larger diameter cable, is recommended. Two cables should be in different colors. / Pay attention to ‘single point earthling’. Make sure that there is only one point of the shielding connected to ground in a single communication link. / Every terminal A(+) should be connected to terminal A(+), terminal B(-) to terminal B(- ), or it will influence the network, or even damage the communication interface. / The connection topology should avoid ‘T’ type which means there is a new branch and it does not begin from the beginning point. / Keep communication cables away from sources of electrical noise whenever possible. 201.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 accuenergy.com accuenergy.com Chapter 2: Installation - Physical Setup When using a long communication cable to connect several devices, an anti signal reflecting resistor (typical value 120Ω-300 Ω/0.25W) is normally added to the end of the cable beside the last meter if the communication quality is distorted. Use RS485 converter with optical isolated output and surge protection. T/R+ T/R- RDX+ RDX- GND VCC S 16 1514RS485 Converter Communication Terminal Block Meter Fig 2-17 Communications Wiring 2.4 Removing meter for servicing or maintenance Power Supply Inputs The wires carrying power into the AcuDC 240 meter must be de-energized regardless of whether the meter is powered by an independent source or by the measured load line. De-energize the wires by turning off the switchgear (disconnect switch, breaker or fuse) leading to the terminal block for pins 11 through 13. The terminal block can then be safely removed. NOTE: Removing the terminal block without turning off the switchgear switch may expose the operator to visible/bare wires that are still connected to dangerously high voltage levels. This may cause injury or death. Voltage Inputs 1. Preparing for Safe Removal De-energize the leads into the voltage pins by turning off the switchgear. NOTE: Removing the voltage leads without turning off the switchgear will expose the operator to dangerously high voltage levels. This may cause injury or death. 2. Disconnecting the Voltage Inputs Using a #2 flathead screw driver, turn each of the screws on pins 1 and 3 counter- clock wise. Stop turning when the wires can be easily removed from their housing. V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 21 V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 22AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters Current Inputs 1. Preparing for Safe Removal If the meter was wired directly in series to the current carrying lines without the use of a shunt/Hall effect sensor then the operator must de-energize the circuit before removing the circuit wires from the AcuDC meter. 2. Disconnecting the current inputs Using a #2 flat head screw driver, screw driver, turn the screws on pins 5 and pin 6 counter-clock wise. Stop turning when the wire can be easily removed from its housing. Cleaning the Meter ACCUENERGY recommends using a dry cloth to wipe the meter. accuenergy.com AcuDC 240 Series DC Power and Energy Meters Chapter 3: Installation - Configuration parameter set-up via display 3.1 Display panel and keys 3.2 General parameter setup 3.2.1 Key’s function in parameters setup 3.2.2 Configure AcuDC to work with shunt 3.2.3 Configure AcuDC for current hall effect sensor 3.2.4 Configure AcuDC for current and hall effect sensor 3.2.5 Clear energy Ah and DI counter 3.2.6 Set backlight brightness 3.2.7 Meter clock setting 3.2.8 Password setting 3.3 AcuDC Communication Setup 3.4 I/O Parameter Setup 3.4.1 AO parameter setting 3.4.2 RO parameter setting V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters CHAPTER 3: INSTALLATION - CONFIGURATION PARAMETER SET-UP VIA DISPLAY 3.1 Display Panel and Keys The front of the AcuDC 240 series meter consists of an LCD screen and two control keys. All the display segments are illustrated in Fig 3-1. Users should note that all the segments will not display in a single page under normal conditions. There are two keys on the front panel, marked as ‘F’ key and ‘V/A’ key, which are used to display different parameter data and parameter settings. 4 1 SET 1kVkAkWMW 22 3 3kWh Fig 3-1 All Display Segments Number Display Description 1 Display data of voltage, current, power and energy 2 kV, kA, kW, MW, kWh, Hz, kvarh, kvar, kVAh Mvar, kVA, MVA, Data Unit 3 241.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 No Icon: no communication One icon: query sent Two icons: query sent and response re- ceived 4 Setting mode: Indicates the meter is in Setting Mode accuenergy.com accuenergy.com Chapter 3: Installation - Configuration Parameter Set-up 3.2 General Parameter Setup Press ‘F’ and ‘V/A’ simultaneously whiles in the metering display mode to get to the system parameter setting mode. In parameter setting mode, pressing ‘F’ and ‘V/A’ simultaneously will exit the system parameter setting mode and return to the metering data mode. General parameter setup will define the general operating characteristics, such as current range setting, shunt current output range setting, rated voltage of voltage Hall Effect sensor, reset energy, Ah and DI counter, meter clock setting, and password reset etc., as shown in table 3-2. NOTE: Some of these settings will vary depending on the model number and firmware version of the meter. Label Paramters Default Options Description Note Communica- tion address 1 The address can 1 ~ 247 be any integer between 1~247 Communication parameter setup 25 Assign different ad- dresses to meters on same bus Baud Rate 19200 1200; 2400; 4800; 9600; 19200; 38400 All devices on the same communica- tion bus must use the same baud rate Parity Non1 Data Transmission Rate even; odd; non1; non2 All devices on the same communica- tion bus must use the same parity Shunt/Hall Effect Sensor Parameter Setup Current input of the shunt / hall effect sensor Only indirect current measurement has this screen Current output of the shunt 20 20 ~ 50000A Corresponds to the output range of the shunt Hall Effect Sensor Setup 100 50 ~ 100mV output range of the current Hall Effect Sensor 0: 4~20mA/0~±5V 1: 4~12-20mA/0~±4V rated voltage of the Voltage Hall Effect Sensor 0 0; 1 Only meter with indi- rect voltage measure- ment has this screen. output range of the voltage Hall Effect Sensor 0 ~ 3000V 0 0; 1 0: 0 ~ ±5V; 1: 0 ~ ±4V Energy, Ah and DI counter clear setup Energy delete(energy clear) No: energy not NO NO; cleared; Yes Yes: clear energy to 0 V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters Label Paramters Default Options Description Note Energy, Ah and DI count- er clear setup 261.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 No: means DI counter not cleared DI; Yes: clear DI counter to 0 Brightness Setup DI counter delete(DI counter clear) NO NO; Yes 1: minimum light level; 5: maximum light level Meter Clock Setup Backlight brightness 5 1 ~ 5 Date 1 ~ 31 Year/month/ date Time 0 ~ 59 24-hour clock Password Setup Password 0000 4 Digitals 3.2.1 Key’s Function in parameters setup Press ‘F’ and ‘V/A’ simultaneously whiles in the metering display mode to get to the system parameter setting mode. In parameter setting mode, pressing ‘F’ and ‘V/A’ simultaneously will exit the system parameter setting mode and return to the metering data mode. In the setting mode: / ‘V/A’ can be used to confirm changes or go to the next screen / ‘F’ can be used to change a setting or enter edit mode. A digit When in edit mode: / Press ‘F’ to increase the number of the flashing digit / Press ‘V/A’ to switch the flashing digit / Press ‘V/A’ on the last digit to confirm the change; the cursor should stop flashing. Once you are in the settings mode, you will be required to type in a password on the ‘PASS’ screen. / Enter your password or leave it as default ‘0000’ if it wasn’t changed. / Press ‘V/A’ to enter the system parameter settings mode. 3.2.2 Configure AcuDC to work with Shunt If the meter is wired to use a shunt to measure the current, you need to configure the full range current setting and shunt output range in the AcuDC so that it can read accurately from the shunt. accuenergy.com accuenergy.com Chapter 3: Installation - Configuration Parameter Set-up Press ‘F’ and ‘V/A’ simultaneously whiles in the metering display mode to get to the system parameter setting mode. In the parameter setting mode, Press ‘V/A’ until you get to the ‘I In’ screen. Enter the rated current input of the shunt in this screen. SET Press ‘F’ to change this setting. A digit will begin to flash and you will enter the edit mode. Press ‘F’ to increase the value of the flashing digit and press ‘V/A’ to switch the flashing digit. Press ‘V/A’ when on the last digit to confirm the change; the cursor will stop flashing at this point Fig 3-2 Full range current setting NOTE: The setting can be configured in the range of 20-50000A. NOTE: Only indirect current wiring has this screen.

SET Press ‘F’ and ‘V/A’ simultaneously whiles in the metering display mode to get to the system parameter setting mode. In the parameter setting mode, press ‘V/A’ until the screen ‘I o’ displays. This setting corresponds to the output range of the shunt. Press ‘F’ to change this setting. The first digit will begin to flash. Press Fig 3-3 Full range shunt setting ‘F’ to increase the value of the flashing digit. Use ‘V/A’ to switch the flashing digit. Press ‘V/A’ to confirm the change on the last flashing digit to go to the next screen. NOTE: The setting can be configured in the range of 50-100mV. 3.2.3 Configure AcuDC to work with Current Hall Effect Sensor If the meter is wired to measure current using a Hall Effect sensor, you will have to configure the full range current setting and Current Hall Effect sensor output range in the AcuDC, so that it can read accurately from the Hall Effect Sensor. To change the settings from the meter’s display, first get to the parameter setting mode. V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 27

V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters SET Refer to section 3.2.2 configure AcuDC to work with Hall Effect Sensor, first set the full range current setting as shown in Fig 3-2. Press ‘F’ and ‘V/A’ simultaneously whiles in the metering display mode to get to the system parameter setting mode. In the parameter setting mode, Press ‘V/A’ until you get to the ‘I In’ Fig 3-4 Current Hall Effect sensor setting screen as shown in Fig 3-2. Enter the rated current input of the shunt in this screen. After setting up the current range, press ‘V/A’ until the screen ‘I P’ displays. This setting corresponds to the output range of the Hall Effect Sensor. Press ‘F’ to change this setting and to select required output. Press ‘V/A’ to confirm this setting; the cursor will stop flashing at this point. NOTE: The default setting is ‘0’ for 4~20mA/0~±5V. The other mode is ‘1’ for 4-12~20mA/0~±4V. 3.2.4 Configure AcuDC to work with Current and Voltage Hall Effect Sensor If the meter is wired to measure current and voltage using a current hall effect sensor and voltage hall effect sensor respectively, You need to configure the settings in the AcuDC so that it can read accurately from both Hall Effect Sensors. Refer to section 3.2.2 configure AcuDC to work with shunt, first set up the current input range as shown in Fig 3-2 full range current setting. SET After setting up the current range, press ‘V/A’ to go to the next screen, as shown in Fig 3-5. This will be the ‘I P’ screen. This setting corresponds to the output range of the current Hall Effect Sensor. Press ‘F’ to change this setting and to select required output. Press ‘V/A’ to confirm this setting; the cursor will Fig 3-5 Current Hall stop flashing at this point. Effect sensor setting NOTE: The default setting is ‘0’ for 4~20mA/0~±5V. The other mode is ‘1’ for 4-12~20mA/0~±4V. 281.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 accuenergy.com accuenergy.com Chapter 3: Installation - Configuration Parameter Set-up SET After setting up the output range of the Current Hall Effect Sensor, as shown in Fig 3-5, press ‘V/A’ to go to the next screen. This will be the ‘U In’ screen, as shown in Fig 3-6. Enter the rated voltage of the Voltage Hall Effect Sensor. Press ‘F’ to change this setting. A digit will begin to flash and you will Fig3-6 Range Voltage setting enter edit mode. Press ‘F’ to increase the value of the flashing digit. Press ‘V/A’ to switch the flashing digit. Press ‘V/A’ when on the last digit to confirm the change; the cursor will stop flashing at this point. SET After setting up the rated voltage of the voltage Hall Effect Sensor, as shown in Fig 3-6, press ‘V/A’ to go to the next screen. This will be the ‘U P’ screen. This setting corresponds to the output range of the voltage Hall Effect Sensor. Press ‘F’ to change this setting and to select required output. Press ‘V/A’ Fig 3-7 Voltage Hall Effect Sensor setting to confirm this setting; the cursor will stop flashing at this point.

NOTE: The default setting is ‘0’: 0~±5V. The other mode is ‘1’: for 0~±4V. 3.2.5 Clear Energy, Ah and DI Counter

SET To clear the readings from the meter display mode, first get to the Setting mode. Press ‘F’ and ‘V/A’ simultaneously whiles in the metering display mode to get to the system parameter setting mode. In parameter setting mode, press ‘V/A’ until you get to the ‘EdEL’ screen, as shown in Fig 3-8. The screen Fig 3-8 Clear Energy displays ‘No’, which means energy not cleared. Press ‘F’ twice and it will show ‘YES’, which means ‘clear energy’, and the energy will be cleared to 0. After you choose ‘YES’ or ‘NO’, press ‘V/A’ to confirm and go to the next screen. SET Press ‘F’ and ‘V/A’ simultaneously whiles in the metering display mode to get to the system parameter setting mode. In parameter setting mode, press ‘V/A’ until you get to the ‘AdEL’ screen, as shown in Fig 3-9. The screen displays ‘No’, which means charge not cleared. Press ‘F’ twice and it will show Fig 3-9 Clear Ah ‘YES’, which means clear charge Ah, and the charge Ah will be cleared to 0. After you choose ‘YES’ or ‘NO’, press ‘V/A’ to confirm and go to the next screen. V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 29

V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters SET Press ‘F’ and ‘V/A’ simultaneously whiles in the metering display mode to get to the system parameter setting mode. In parameter setting mode, press ‘V/A’ until you get to the ‘ddEL’ screen, as shown in Fig 3-10. The screen displays ‘No’, which means DI counter not cleared’. Press ‘F’ twice and it will show Fig 3-10 DI Counter Reset ‘YES’, which means clear Di counter , and DI counter will be cleared to 0. After you choose ‘YES’ or ‘NO’, press ‘V/A’ to confirm and go to the next screen. 3.2.6 Set Backlight Brightness To set the backlight brightness from the meter display mode, first get to the Setting mode. SET Press ‘F’ and ‘V/A’ simultaneously whiles in the metering display mode to get to the system parameter setting mode. In the parameter setting mode, press ‘V/A’ until you get to the ‘bL’ screen, as shown in Fig 3-11. There are 5 levels backlight brightness. ‘1’ is minimum light level and ‘5’ is maximum light Fig 3-11 Backlight Brightness Setting level. Press ‘F’ to select and press ‘V/A’ to confirm and go to the next screen. 3.2.7 Meter Clock Setting SET Press ‘F’ and ‘V/A’ simultaneously whiles in the metering display mode to get to the system parameter setting mode. In parameter setting mode, press ‘V/A’ until you get to the ‘dATE’ screen, as shown in Fig 3-12. Press ‘F’ to change this setting. A digit will begin to flash and you can change the number. Press Fig 3-12 Date ‘F’ to increase the value of the flashing digit. Press ‘V/A’ to switch Adjustment the flashing digit. Press ‘V/A’ when on the last digit to confirm the change; the cursor will stop flashing at this point. Press ‘V/A’ to confirm and go to the time setting screen. SET Press ‘F’ and ‘V/A’ simultaneously whiles in the metering display mode to get to the system parameter setting mode. In the parameter setting mode, press ‘V/A’ until you get to the ‘TinE’ screen, as shown in Fig 3-13. The meter uses the 24-hour clock system. The time shown in Fig 3-15 is 14:19:52. Press ‘F’ to change Fig 3-13 Time this setting. A digit will begin to flash and you can change the Adjustment number. Press ‘F’ to increase the value of the flashing digit. Press ‘V/A’ to switch the flashing digit. Pressing ‘V/A’ when on the last digit will confirm the change; the cursor will stop flashing at this point. Press ‘V/A’ to confirm and go to the next screen. 301.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 accuenergy.com accuenergy.com Chapter 3: Installation - Configuration Parameter Set-up 3.2.8 Password Setting SET Press ‘F’ and ‘V/A’ simultaneously whiles in the metering display mode to get to the system parameter setting mode. In parameter setting mode, press ‘V/A’ until you get to the ‘PASS’ screen, as shown in Fig 3-14. Press ‘F’ to change this setting. A digit will begin to flash and you can change the number. Press Fig 3-14 Password ‘F’ to increase the value of the flashing digit. Press ‘V/A’ to switch Setting the flashing digit. Press ‘V/A’ when on the last digit to confirm the change; the cursor will stop flashing at this point. Press ‘V/A’ to confirm and go to the next screen.

By now the parameter settings are almost completed, except for the I/O module setting. Pressing ‘F’ and ‘V/A’ simultaneously will exit system parameter settings mode and return to the metering data mode. 3.3 AcuDC Communication Setup NOTE: Only meters with communication options have device address, baud rate and parity setting screens. To set communication parameters from the meter display mode, you must first press the ‘F’ and ‘V/A’ buttons simultaneously to get to the parameter setting mode. The communication parameter setup includes address setup, Baud rate setup, and parity setting, as shown in table 3-3.

SET Communication address can be any integer 1 ~ 247. Fig 3-15 shows the address number is 1. Press ‘F’ to change this setting. The first digit will begin to flash and you can change the edit mode. Press ‘F’ to increase the value of the flashing digit. Press ‘V/A’ to switch the flashing digit. Press ‘V/A’ when on the last Fig 3-15 digit to confirm the change; the cursor will stop flashing at this Communication point. Press ‘V/A’ to confirm and scroll to the next screen. Address Setup

NOTE: Modbus-RTU communication protocol requires that all meters on the same communication bus should have different addresses.

SET After address setup, the second screen is Baud rate setting page, or in parameter setting mode, press ‘V/A’ until see ‘bPS’ on the screen. Baud rate can be set as 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19200 and 38400. Fig 3-18 shows the baud rate is 19200 bps. Press ‘F’ to select the desired baud rate, and then press ‘V/A’ to Fig 3-16 Baud Rate confirm and go to the next screen. Setting V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 31

V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters SET After Baud rate setup, the next screen is the Parity setting page, or in parameter setting mode, press the ‘V/A’ button until you see ‘CHEC’ on the screen. Parity can be set as EVEN: even parity, 1 stop bit; ODD: odd parity, 1 stop bit; 1: no parity, 1 stop bit; 2: no parity, 2 stop bits. Fig 3-17 shows no parity, and 1 stop bit. Press ‘F’ to select Fig 3-17 Parity the desired baud rate, and then press ‘V/A’ to confirm and go to Setting the next screen. NOTE: All devices on the same communication bus should use the same baud rate and parity settings. 3.4 I/O Parameter Setup I/O module has two optional types: AO(Analog Output) type and RO(Relay Output) type. In the system parameter setting operation, hold the ’F” key for 3 seconds to enter the AO parameter setting mode, or hold the ‘V/A’ key for 3 seconds to enter the RO parameter setting mode. In the AO or RO setting mode, key functions are the same as in system parameter settings mode. ‘F’ key is used to increase value by 1 for the flashing digit. ‘V/A’ key is used to confirm the flashing digit and move to the cursor. At the last digit of the parameter, pressing ‘V/A’ key will confirm and go to the next screen. On ant screen, pressing ‘F’ and ‘V/A’ simultaneously will exit AO or RO parameter settings mode and return to the system parameter settings mode. Note: only the meters have AO or RO functions have the valid operations for the corresponding AO or RO parameter setting . 3.4.1 Meter Clock Setting For the module that supports the Analog Output function, it offers two AO channels. The AO parameter can be voltage, current and power. AO upper and lower limits include ‘sign’ and ‘percentage’ digit. The sign digit has three options”: represents (+), represents (-), represents (±). The range of the percentage digit is ‘0.00~1.00’, representing ‘0%~100%’ of the full range value. When the AO parameter is set as voltage, the upper and lower limit setting is ‘0%~100%’. When AO parameter is set as current or power, there are four modes:’ 0%~ +100%’; 0%~ -100%’;’-100%~ +100%’ and ‘0%~ ±100%’. NOTE: 1. There is no ‘sign’ digit when AO is set as voltage. ‘sign’ digit is invisible when percentage is 0. 2. For limit setting, 1.00 is 100%, 0 is 0%, and 0.25 is 25%. 321.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 accuenergy.com

accuenergy.com Chapter 3: Installation - Configuration Parameter Set-up SET In parameter setting mode, hold ‘F’ for 3 seconds until the screen ‘AotP’ displays (as shown in Fig 3-18), the meter is in AO parameter setting mode. It is the AO output setting. There are four AO output modes: 0: 0 ~ 5V; 1: 1 ~ 5V; 2: 0 ~ 20mA; 3: 4 ~ 20mA. Press ‘F’ key to select the type number (0, 1, 2 or 3), and then press Fig 3-18 AO Output ‘V/A’ key to confirm and scroll to the next screen setting page. Setting For example, Fig 3-18 shows the output type is 3, it means its AO output type is 4~20mA mode. NOTE: AO output type is determined by the equipped I/O module you ordered; incorrect parameter setting will result in invalid AO output value. SET In AO parameter setting mode, press ‘V/A’ until the screen ‘Ao 1P’ displays (as shown in Fig 3-19). It is AO1 parameter setting. There are three options: 0: voltage; 1: current; 2: power. Press ‘F’ key to select the parameter number (0, 1, or 2), and then press ‘V/A’ key to confirm and scroll to the next screen setting page. Fig 3-19 Fig 3-19 AO1 shows the AO1 is se t as current. Parameter Setting NOTE: AcuDC 241 and 242 do not have this screen. AO1 is set as what is being measured. SET In AO parameter setting mode, press ‘V/A’ until the screen ‘Ao 1L’ displays (as shown in Fig 3-20). It is AO1 lower limit setting, range is ‘0.00 ~ 1.00’. There is no ‘sign’ digit when the limit is 0. When the limit is not 0, the ‘sign’ digit will be visible, the sign can be adjusted by moving the cursor to the digit. Press ‘F’ and ‘V/A’ to Fig 3-20 AO1 Lower Limit Setting SET 33 edit the value, and then press ‘V/A’ key to confirm and scroll to the next screen setting page. Fig 3-20 shows the AO1 lower limit is set as 0. In AO parameter setting mode, press ‘V/A’ until the screen ‘Ao 1H’ displays (as shown in Fig 3-21). It is AO1 upper limit setting, range is ‘-100% ~ +100%’. The entire upper limit’s absolute value cannot be smaller or equal to the lower limit’. Under no circumstance can the upper limit be 0. Press ‘F’ to edit the value, and then press Fig 3-21 AO1 Up Limit Setting ‘V/A’ key to confirm and scroll to the next screen setting page. Fig 3-21 shows the AO1 up limit is set as +100%. V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018

V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters SET In AO parameter setting mode, press ‘V/A’ until the screen ‘Ao 2P’ displays (as shown in Fig 3-22). It is AO2 parameter setting. There are three options: 0: voltage; 1: current; 2: power. Press ‘F’ key to select the parameter number (0, 1, or 2), and then press ‘V/A’ key to confirm and scroll to the next screen setting page. Fig 3-22 Fig 3-22 AO2 shows the AO2 is set as voltage. Parameter Setting NOTE: 241 and 242 do not have this screen. AO1 is set as what is being measured. SET In AO parameter setting mode, press ‘V/A’ until the screen ‘Ao 2L’ displays (as shown in Fig 3-23). It is AO1 lower limit setting, range is ‘0.00 ~ 1.00’. There is no ‘sign’ digit when the limit is 0. When the limit is not 0, the ‘sign’ digit will be visible, the sign can be adjusted by moving the cursor to the digit. Press ‘F’ to edit the Fig 3-23 AO2 Lower Limit Setting value, and then press ‘V/A’ key to confirm and scroll to the next screen setting page. Fig 3-23 shows the AO1 lower limit is set as 0. SET In AO parameter setting mode, press ‘V/A’ until the screen ‘Ao 2H’ displays (as shown in Fig 3-22). It is the AO2 upper limit setting, range is ‘-100% ~ +100%’. The entire upper limit’s absolute value cannot be smaller or equal to the lower limit’. Under no circumstance can the upper limit be 0. Press ‘F’ to edit the value, Fig 3-24 AO2 Up Limit Setting and then press ‘V/A’ key to confirm and scroll to the next screen setting page. Fig 3-24 shows the AO1 up limit is set as +100%. 3.4.2 RO parameter setting In the system parameter setting operation page after successfully entering the password, hold the ‘V/A’ key for 3 seconds to enter the RO parameter setting page. The I/O module that contains the Relay Output function offers two RO channels. There are three modes for RO: Latch, Momentary and alarm. The mode setting depends on the object requirement i.e. A circuit breaker use Momentary. The momentary delay time is 300-5000 ms. Due to the relay action time error, this delay time has up to 3ms error. 341.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 accuenergy.com accuenergy.com SET Fig 3-25 RO1 Mode Setting SET Fig 3-26 RO1 Momentary Delay Time SET Fig 3-27 RO1 Alarm Parameter Setting SET Fig 3-28 RO1 Alarm Inequality Setting SET Fig 3-29 RO1 Alarm Threshold Range Setting Chapter 3: Installation - Configuration Parameter Set-up RO1 mode setting: In the parameter setting mode, hold ‘V/A’ for 3 seconds until the screen ‘Ro1F’ displays (as shown in Fig 3-23), the meter is in RO parameter setting mode. There are 3 RO1 modes: 0: Latch; 1: Momentary; 2: Alarm. Press ‘F’ key to select the mode number (0, 1 or 2), and then press ‘V/A’ key to confirm and scroll to the next screen setting page. For example, Fig 3-25 shows the RO1 mode is Latch. RO1 momentary delay time setting: In RO parameter setting mode, if RO1 mode is set as 1, Momentary, press ‘V/A’ key until the screen ‘Ro1d’ displays. The delay range in 300 ~ 5000 ms. Press ‘F’ to set the delay time. And then press ‘V/A’ key to confirm and scroll to the next screen setting page. Fig 3-26 shows the RO1 momentary delay time is 500ms, or 0.5s. RO1 alarm parameter setting: In RO parameter setting mode, if RO1 mode is set as 2, Alarm, press ‘V/A’ key until the screen ‘Ro1P’ displays. There are 4 options: 0: no alarm; 1: voltage; 2: current; 3: power. Press ‘F’ to select setting and press ‘V/A’ key to confirm and scroll to the next screen setting page. Fig 3-27 shows the RO1 alarm is ‘no alarm’. RO1 alarm inequality setting: In RO parameter setting mode, if RO1 mode is set as 2, Alarm, press ‘V/A’ key until the screen ‘Ro1S’ displays. There are 2 options: 0: smaller than; 1: larger than. Press ‘F’ to select and press ‘V/A’ key to confirm and scroll to the next screen setting page. RO1 alarm threshold range setting: In RO parameter setting mode, if RO1 mode is set as 2, Alarm, press ‘V/A’ key until the screen ‘Ro1u’ displays. The threshold setting range is the same as measurement range. Voltage: 0 ~ 3000V; Current: 0 ~ 50000A; Power: 0- 60000kW. Press ‘F’ to edit the value, and press ‘V/A’ key to confirm and scroll to the next screen setting page. V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 35

V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters SET RO1 alarm delay setting: In RO parameter setting mode, if RO1 mode is set as 2, Alarm, press ‘V/A’ key until the screen ‘Ro1t’ displays. The alarm delay time range is 0 ~ 255 s. In Fig 3-30, the alarm delay time is 15 seconds. If the alarm condition is met, after 15 second, the alarm will be triggered; or if the alarm Fig 3-30 RO1 Alarm Delay Setting condition is no longer met, after 15 seconds, the alarm will be restored. Press ‘F’ to edit the value, and press ‘V/A’ key to confirm and scroll to the next screen setting page. SET RO2 mode setting: In RO parameter setting mode, press ‘V/A’ until the screen ‘Ro2F’ displays (as shown in Fig 3-31). There are 3 RO2 modes: 0: Latch; 1: Momentary; 2: Alarm. Press ‘F’ key to select the mode number (0, 1 or 2), and then press ‘V/A’ key to confirm and scroll to the next screen setting page. For example, Fig 3-31 RO2 Mode Fig 3-29 shows the RO2 mode is Latch. Setting SET RO2 momentary: In RO parameter setting mode, if RO1 mode is set as 1, Momentary, press ‘V/A’ key until the screen ‘Ro2d’ displays. The delay range in 300 ~ 5000 ms. Press ‘F’ to set the delay time and then press ‘V/A’ key to confirm and scroll to the next screen setting page. Fig 3-30 shows the R21 momentary Fig 3-32 RO2 delay time is 500ms, or 0.5s. Momentary Delay Time SET RO2 alarm parameter setting : In RO parameter setting mode, if RO2 mode is set as 2, Alarm, press ‘V/A’ key until the screen ‘Ro2P’ displays. There are 4 options: 0: no alarm; 1: voltage; 2: current; 3: power. Press ‘F’ to select and press ‘V/A’ key to confirm and scroll to the next screen setting page. Fig 3-33 shows the Fig 3-33 RO2 Alarm RO2 alarm parameter is set as ‘voltage’. Parameter Setting SET RO2 alarm inequality setting: In RO parameter setting mode, if RO2 mode is set as 2, Alarm, press ‘V/A’ key until the screen ‘Ro2S’ displays. There are 2 options: 0: smaller than; 1: larger than. Press ‘F’ to select and press ‘V/A’ key to confirm and scroll to the next screen setting page. Fig 3-34 RO2 Alarm Inequality Setting 361.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 accuenergy.com

accuenergy.com Chapter 3: Installation - Configuration Parameter Set-up SET RO2 alarm threshold range setting: In RO parameter setting mode, if RO2 mode is set as 2, Alarm, press ‘V/A’ key until the screen ‘Ro2u’ displays. The threshold setting range is the same as measurement range. Voltage: 0 ~ 3000 V; Current: 0 ~ 50000A; Power: 0~ 60000kW. Press ‘F’ to edit the value and press ‘V/A’ key Fig 3-35 RO2 Alarm to confirm and scroll to the next screen setting page. Threshold Range Setting SET RO2 alarm delay setting: In RO parameter setting mode, if RO2 mode is set as 2, Alarm, press ‘V/A’ key until the screen ‘Ro2t’ displays. The alarm delay time range is 0 ~ 255, unit: second. In Fig 3-36, the alarm delay time is 15 second. If the alarm condition is met, after 15 second, alarm will be triggered; or if the alarm Fig 3-36 RO2 Alarm Delay Setting condition is no longer met, after 15 seconds, the alarm will be restored. Press ‘F’ to edit the value, and press ‘V/A’ key to confirm and scroll to the next screen setting page. Table 3-3 I/O Parameter Setting Label Paramters Options Description AO Output 0; 1; 2; 3 0: 0 ~ 5V; 1: 1 ~ 5V; 2: 0 ~ 20mA; 3: 4 ~ 20mA AO1 Parameter 0; 1; 2 0: voltage; 1: current; 2: power AO1 lower limit 0.00 ~ 1.00 0%-100% AO (Analogy Output) AO1 up limit -1.00 ~ +1.00 37 -100%~100% The entire upper limit’s absolute value should be larger than the lower limit. AO2 parameter 0; 1; 2 0: voltage; 1: current; 2: power AO2 lower limit 0.00 ~ 1.00 0%~100% AO2 up limit -1.00 ~ +1.00 -100%~100% The entire upper limit’s absolute value should be larger than the lower limit. RO 0: Latch; RO1 mode 0; 1; 2 1:Momentary; 2: Alarm RO1 momentary delay time 300 ~ 5000 Unit: ms RO1 alarm parameter 0; 1; 2; 3 0: no alarm; 1: voltage; 2: current; 3: power V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018

V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters Label Paramters Options Description RO 381.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 RO1 alarm inequality 0; 1 0: smaller than; 1: larger than RO1 alarm threshold range Voltage: 0 ~ 3000 V; Current: 0 ~ 50000A; Power: 0~ 60000kW. RO1 alarm delay 0 ~ 255 unit: second RO2 mode 0; 1; 2 0: Latch; 1:Momentary; 2: Alarm RO2 momentary delay time 300 ~ 5000 Unit: ms RO2 alarm parameter 0; 1; 2; 3 0: no alarm; 1: voltage; 2: current; 3: power RO2 alarm inequality 0; 1 0: smaller than; 1: larger than RO2 alarm threshold range Voltage: 0 ~ 1200V; Current: 0 ~ 50000A; Power: 0~ 6000kW RO2 alarm delay 0 ~ 255 unit: second accuenergy.com

AcuDC 240 Series DC Power and Energy Meters Chapter 4: Viewing Metering Parameters via Display 4.1 General Display on the AcuDC 4.2 View the Meter and Load Running Time 4.3 View the Serial Number from the Meter V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 40AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters CHAPTER 4: VIEWING METERING PARAMETERS – VIA DISPLAY You can view different information from the metering screen. For example, you can view voltage, current, power, energy, electric charge and clock information. In the metering screen, press ‘F’ to go to next screen, press ‘V/A’ to go to the different windows to view different information. 4.1 General Display on the AcuDC AcuDC 240 normally displays the metering screen, which shows real-time measured data, such as voltage, current, power, energy, meter clock, DI counter etc., as shown in table 4-1. The first screen on the metering screen shows voltage, current and power. Please note that AcuDC241 only shows voltage and AcuDC242 only shows current. Only AcuDC243 shows voltage, current and power at the same time. accuenergy.com accuenergy.com Chapter 4: Viewing Metering Parameters via Display V For the AcuDC 241, it only displays voltage, and there is a unit ‘V’ shown at the top right corner. For example, the screen in Fig. 4-1 shows it is AcuDC 241, and the voltage is 220.2V. Fig 4-1 Voltage Display (AcuDC 241) For the AcuDC 242, it only displays current, and there is a unit ‘A’ k shown at the top right corner. For example, the screen in Fig. 4-2 Shows it is AcuDC 242, and the current is 49.99A. Fig 4-2 Current Display (AcuDC 242) For the AcuDC 243, the screen displays current, voltage and 1 V AkW power, and the units are ‘V, A and kW’ shown at the top right 2corner. The first line displays voltage, the second line displays current and the third line displays power. For example, the voltage 3shown in the left figure is 220.2V; the current shown in the left figure is 49.99A, the power shown in the left figure is 11.00KW. Fig 4-3Multifunction Communication status is active. Display (AcuDC 243) NOTE: Communication status is displayed on every screen in AcuDC 243. Press ‘F’ to view the Energy data. You can press ‘V/A’ on the energy screen to switch between different types of energy. E1 = Import Energy (consumed energy), E2 = Export Energy (generated energy) , E3 = Total Energy (absolute sum of import energy and export energy), and E4 = Net Energy (algebraic sum of import energy and export energy). kWh kWh kWh kWh (a) Import Energy (b) Export Energy (c) Total Energy (d) Net Energy Fig 4-4 Energy Display V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 41 V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters Press ‘F’ to go to the third screen. The third screen shows Electric charge. You can press ‘V/A’ on the electric charge screen to switch between different types of charges. Ah1 = Import Charge, Ah2 = Export Charge, Ah3 = Total Charge (absolute sum of Import Charge Ah and Export Charge Ah), and Ah4 = Net Charge (algebraic sum of Import Charge Ah and Export Charge Ah).(a) Import Charge (b) Export Charge Fig 4-5 Charge Display Press ‘F’ to go to the fourth screen. The fourth screen shows clock information. For example, screen displayed in Fig 4-6a shows the date is 2014:04:09; screen displayed in Fig 4-6b shows the time is 14:19:52. You can press ‘V/A’ on the clock information screen to switch between the date and time. (a) Date Display Fig 4-6 Clock Information Display If the meter is equipped with DI counting function (AcuDC 240 with I/O module), press ‘F’ key to go to the DI count display screen. You can press ‘V/A’ on the DI counting screen to switch between the DI1 and DI2 counting. (a) DI1 Count Display Fig 4-7 DI Count Display 421.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 (c) Total Charge (b) Time Display (b) DI2 Count Display (d) Net Charge SET accuenergy.com accuenergy.com Chapter 4: Viewing Metering Parameters via Display Screen No. Widnow No. Description Operation Voltage Current Power 1 1 241 only displays voltage; 242 only displays current; 243 displays all First screen in metering data display mode Energy E1 2 1 E1: import energy Press ‘F’ at last screen E2 2 E2: export energy Press ‘V/A’ E3 3 E3: Total energy Press ‘V/A’ E4 4 E4: net energy Press ‘V/A’ Charge Ah1 3 1 Ah1: import charge Press ‘F’ at last screen Ah2 2 Ah2: export charge Press ‘V/A’ Ah3 3 Ah3: Total charge Press ‘V/A’ Ah4 4 Ah4: net charge Press ‘V/A’ Meter Clock Date 4 1 Year/month/day Press ‘F’ at last screen Time 2 Hour/min/sec 24-hour clock Press ‘V/A’ DI count number DI1 Count 5 1 Press ‘F’ at last screen DI2 Count 2 Press ‘V/A’ 4.2 View the Meter and Load Running Time If you press down the ‘F’ button for about 3 seconds while in the metering data mode, you will get to the meter information display mode. You can press ‘F’ to exit the meter information display mode. / In this meter information display mode, you can press ‘V/A’ to switch between the meter running hours and load running hours. ‘r’ means meter running hours while ‘L’ means load running hours. (a) Meter Running (b) Load Running Time Time Fig 4-8 Running Time Display V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 43 V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 44AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters 4.3 View the serial number from the meter If you press down the ‘V/A’ button for about 3 seconds while in the metering data mode, you will get to the serial number display mode. You can press ‘V/A’ to exit the serial number display mode. Fig 4-9 Serial Number NOTE: This screen displays the last 8 digits of the meter’s serial number. accuenergy.com AcuDC 240 Series DC Power and Energy Meters Chapter 5: Viewing Real-Time Readings via Acuview Software 5.1 Connection Setup 5.1.1 Wiring 5.1.2 Acuview software setup 5.2 Configuration Parameters Setup 5.2.1 General meter parameter setting 5.2.2 Configure the Data Log using the meter’s memory 5.2.3 Configure the Data Log to log to computer memory 5.3 Viewing Metering Parameters 5.3.1 Real-time Metering 5.3.2 Reading Data Log on meter’s onboar memory 5.3.3 Reading Data Log on a computer’s memory V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters CHAPTER 5: Viewing Real-time Readings Via AcuView Software This chapter will mainly discuss how to use the meter via the communication port using software. It is highly recommended that previous chapters be read before moving onto Chapter 5, a familiarity with Modbus would also be helpful. 5.1 Connection Setup 5.1.1 Wiring Refer to section 2.3.6(Communications Wiring) 5.1.2 Acuview Software Setup 1. New Connection: A connection is required before communicating with the meter. To add a new connection, do one of the following: 1) Click Setting > Connection Manager or2) Click the icon / New: add a new connection / Delete: Delete the select connection / Edit: Edit the selected connection settings. / Close: Close the window / Status: ‘Available’ means Com Port is active, and ‘not Available’ means Com Port is inactive. If the status is blank, it means that Com Port has not been established. 461.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 The Connection Manager is shown as in Fig 5-1. Fig 5-1 Connection Manager accuenergy.com accuenergy.com 2. Connection Settings: Set the connection parameters. The Connection Settings box is shown on the screen as in Fig. 5-2 Click ‘OK’ after settings finish. 1) Click Operation > Add Device or2) Click the icon Fig 5-2 Acuview Software Connection Settings / Name: Give connection a name / Type: Select the serial port that the RS485 connection is using / Com Port: Select the serial port that the RS485 connection is using / Baud Rate: Should match the baud rate in the meter settings. / Parity: Should match the parity in the meter settings. / Scan Interval: Used to adjust the time interval between two message(200ms or 500ms is recommended) NOTE: Baud Rate and Parity must match between meter and software. NOTE: How to find ‘Com Port’ in your computer Right click on ‘Computer’, then click ‘Properties’ menu. In the pop up window click on ‘Device Manager’ from the left navigation panel to find the port number. In the device Manager window, double click on ‘Port (COM&LPT)’ from the dropdown list. Find the ‘USB Serial Port (COMx)’ the number in brackets is the port number, i.e. COM4. Please select the corresponding Com Port here. Chapter 5: Viewing Real-Time Readings via Acuview Software

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V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters 3. Add Device: After performing step 1 and 2 above, you need to add a device to communicate with. To add a new device, do one of the following: 1) Click Operation >Add Device or2) Click the icon The Add Device box is shown as Fig 5-3. Click ‘OK’ after settings finish. Fig 5-3 Add Device / Device Type: The model of the device you are going to communicate with / Connection: Select a connection for the communication / Device Address: Should match the address in the meter settings / Description: Device description such as where the device is used, for example, ‘Building 1’. 481.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 accuenergy.com

accuenergy.com 4. Connection: You can read all the measurement data after you successfully complete Step 3. To connect, do one of the following: 1) Click Operation > Connect Or 2) Click the icon Or 3) Press F9 on keyboard If the connection is successful, the screen will show the measured data on the screen, and you will see ‘Com Failure = 0, Log Failure = 0’ at the bottom right corner on the screen. If the connection is not successful, no measured data will appear on the screen, and you will see ‘Com Failure = 1, Log Failure = 0’ at the bottom right corner on the screen in red. NOTE: If connection is not successful, please make sure: The physical connection of the device is correct; the communication parameters, such as Baud Rate, Parity, device type and device address are not properly set. 5.2 Configuration Parameters Setup 5.2.1 General Meter Parameter Setting / From the left navigation panel click on the ‘Settings’ tab and then on ‘General’. You can set up the system parameters and I/O settings from this section, as shown in Fig 5-4. / Click on ‘Update Device’ after making changes, so that the changes can be saved on the meter. Parameters can be setup with following rules: Security and Communication: You can set the meter’s password, device address, Baud Rate and parity from this section and the meter will make the corresponding changes. Voltage and Current: If you are measuring your voltage using a voltage Hall Effect sensor and/or your current using either a Hall Effect sensor or a shunt, you will have to set the Voltage and/or Current sections. Chapter 5: Viewing Real-Time Readings via Acuview Software

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V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 50AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters RO1 Output Mode/RO2 Output Mode: This is available with the ‘X3’ module Choose between the three modes: / Latch: To manually turn on and off the relay / Momentary: To turn on the relay for a set number of seconds before it goes back off. / If momentary mode is selected, set the delay time ‘On Time’; the range is 300- 5000ms. The delay time has an error of up to 3ms (due to the relay action time error) / Alarm: To trigger the relay output through an alarm event. RO Alarm Limit: Set the Alarm Channel, Setting, Setpoint and Delay (in sec) for both RO1 and RO2; this is needed if RO1/RO2 Output mode is set as ‘Alarm’ Fig 5-4 General settings accuenergy.com

accuenergy.com Chapter 5: Viewing Real-Time Readings via Acuview Software Raw Channel of AO1/Raw Channel of AO2: The settings are available with the X1 and X2 modules Select the parameter (Voltage, Current, Power) you will like to send as an Analog Output. Set the High and Low Limit based on the parameter you have selected. Note: / When AO parameter is set as voltage, the upper and lower limit setting range is between 0% - 100%. E.g. it can be set as: 0% - 100%, 0% - 50% etc. / When AO parameter is set as current or power, there are four different modes for the upper and lower limit setting range. It can be between: 0% - +100%, 0% - -100%, -100% - +100%, and 0% - ±100%. E.g. it can be set as: 0% - +50%, 0% - -50% etc. / Upper Limit cannot be 0% Other: / You can adjust the backlight brightness under the Backlight Adjustment section. The range is from 1 to 5. DI 1 Type/ DI 2 Type: Select DI 1 or DI 2 as: / State: DI will act as a switch status monitor / Counter: DI will act as a pulse counter. NOTE: You can ‘import’ a saved device profile to quickly setup the meter parameters: Click Tools->Import Device Settings, select the desired file and click ‘Open’, and after importing successfully, click ‘Update Device’, or click Tools->Import and Update Device, select the desired file. You also can save the current settings to a file via the export device profile function in ‘Tools’. 5.2.2 Configure the Data Log using the meter’s onboard memory You can set up the meter to log data on the onboard memory. / From the left navigation panel click on the settings tab then click ‘Data Log’ to access the data log setting page (as shown in Fig 5-5).

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V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters Fig 5-5 Data Log readings Parameter Selection: Select the parameters you would like to log (from the left box), click ‘Add’ to add them to the box on the right. Enable Data Log: Make sure you check the box ‘Enabled’ to enable data log. Time Setting: There are three different Logging Modes. / Continuous: This will start logging data immediately, after the ‘Update Device’ button is clicked. / In this mode, you will have to set the Logging Interval. / Scheduling: This will start logging data from a set Start Time. / In this mode, you will have to set the Logging Interval and Start Time. NOTE: When the memory is full, a memory sector is deleted and the data logging will continue for the above two modes. / Interval: This will log data from a start time to an end time. / In this mode, you will have to set the Logging Interval, as well as the Start Time and End Time. NOTE: When the memory is full, the data logging will stop. Make sure to click on ‘Update Device’ after making changes, so that the changes can be saved on the meter. NOTE: When you click on ‘Update Device’, the meter’s data log memory will be erased. 521.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 accuenergy.com

accuenergy.com 5.2.3 Configure the data log to log the readings on the computer’s memory This applies to AcuDC 240 series meters with communication option; the meters do not need to have onboard memory since the data will be logged directly on the computer’s memory. You can set up the meter to log data directly on the computer memory. You must always be connected to the software for this data log method to work. You can access this data log setting by clicking on the ‘Settings’ option located on the menu toolbar, and then clicking on ‘Data Log Settings’ or click the icon Fig 5-6 Accessing Data Log The Data Log Setting window will open. This is shown in Fig 5-6. In data log setting, as shown in Fig 5-7, make sure you check the ‘Enabled’ box in the window. Under the ‘Logging Items of Selection’ Section: click on the required groups of parameters you will like to log. Under the ‘Logging Options’ Section: Chapter 5: Viewing Real-Time Readings via Acuview Software

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V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters In data log setting, as shown in Fig 5-7, make sure you check the ‘Enabled’ box in the window. Under the ‘Logging Items of Selection’ Section: click on the required groups of parameters you will like to log. Under the ‘Logging Options’ Section: / Choose the ‘Logging Data Interval’. / Choose between the options ‘Log data until file is full’ or ‘Specify Log file duration’ / If ‘Specify Log file duration’ is selected: Choose how often you want a new file created. / Choose the ‘Log file format’ you want the file(s) saved as. Enter the preferred name for the file in ‘Log file name’. Choose the ‘Log file folder location’ where the file(s) will be saved. Once everything is set, click ‘OK’. Finally, make sure you click the icon 541.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 on the top of the screen to start data logging on the computer. You can click the icon Fig 5-7 Data Log settings on the top of the screen to stop data logging. accuenergy.com

accuenergy.com WARNING: If ‘Excel’ is chosen as the ‘Log file format’: After you click on the icon to start data logging, a warning window will pop up. Take note of the warning in order to prevent your files from being corrupt.Fig 5-8 Warning To get help or more information on the Acuview software, please click ‘help’ in the main menu bar, of click the icon . Chapter 5: Viewing Real-Time Readings via Acuview Software V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 55

V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 56AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters 5.3 Viewing Metering Parameters 5.3.1 Real-Time Metering From the left navigation panel click on the ‘Readings’ tab and then select ‘Real-Time Metering’ to view the meter’s real time data. You can read voltage, current, energy, charge etc, as shown in Fig 5-9. You can modify the value of energy and charge by clicking the underlined figures. And you can also reset the energy, charge, DI counter and Max and Min by clicking ‘Reset’, the values will reset to 0. On this reading window you can also control relay 1 and relay 2. Fig 5-9 Reading Real Time Meter (change another picture, with load, this reading without load, so voltage is 0) accuenergy.com

accuenergy.com 5.3.2 Reading Data Log on Meter’s Onboard Memory From the left navigation panel click on the ‘Readings’ tab and then select ‘Data Log’ to retrieve the meter’s logged readings. The parameter settings for data log in meter’s onboard memory refer to section 5.2.2 (Configure the Data Log using the meter’s onboard memory). On this window you can view the data log, while the maximum record number is 85995. Chapter 5: Viewing Real-Time Readings via Acuview Software Fig 5-12 Reading Data Log on Meter’s Onboard Memory

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V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 58AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters 5.3.3 Reading Data Log on the computer’s memory Find the data log files from the specified folder location where the file was saved. The parameter settings for data log on the computer’s memory refer to section 5.2.3. If you chose the default path, there is a folder named MonData in the Acuview installation directory where all the data log files are stored. By default, each file name consists of device description, device type, port(Serial mode), device address and data logging starting time whose format is YYYYMMDD(Year, Month, Day). After you open a data log file, you will see the following items: ‘Time U (V) I (A) P (kW)’. The file content is the same whether data is saved as .txt or .csv or .Excel. accuenergy.com

AcuDC 240 Series DC Power and Energy Meters Appendix A. Troubleshooting B. Modbus Register Map B.1 MODBUS-RTU Protocol B.2 Communication Format B.3 AcuDC 240 Communication Address Table C. Ordering Information D. Glossary of Definitions V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 60AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters APPENDIX This chapter will mainly discuss how to use the meter via the communication port using software. It is highly recommended that previous chapters be read before moving onto Chapter 5, a familiarity with Modbus would also be helpful. A. Troubleshooting My AcuDC 243 is displaying the correct current but the power (kW) is negative. Check to see if the AcuDC is installed on the negative terminal of the load. Why is my AcuDC 243 measuring the wrong current with the Current Hall Effect Sensor? A connection is required before communicating with the meter. To add a new connection, do one of the following: / The Hall Effect Sensor should be installed on the negative side of the load. / Ensure that the Hall Effect sensor is being powered. If the sensor was purchased from Accuenergy then the sensor will need a ±15V dc power supply. / Ensure that the wiring of the sensor is to the AcuDC is correct. / Terminal 3 of the sensor should be connected to ‘I+’ of the AcuDC 243. / Terminal 4 of the sensor should be connected to ‘I-‘of the AcuDC 243. •/ Terminal 4 of the sensor must also be connected to Ground. •/ Check that the settings in the meter are configured to read accurately from that sensor. •/ Press ‘F’ and ‘V/A’ simultaneously whiles on the meter data mode to get to the settings mode. •/ A password screen will display. Leave the password as default ‘0000’ and press ‘V/A’ to enter the setting mode; the communication address ‘AddR’ screen will display next. •/ Press ‘V/A’ until you get to the ‘I In’ screen. Enter the rated current input of the Hall Effect Sensor in this screen. •/ Press ‘F’ to change this setting. A digit will begin to flash and you will enter the edit mode. •/ Press ‘F’ to increase the value of the flashing digit •/ Press ‘V/A’ to switch the flashing digit •/ Press ‘V/A’ when on the last digit to confirm the change; the cursor will stop flashing at this point accuenergy.com accuenergy.com Appendix SET •/ Press ‘V/A’ to go to the next screen. This will be the ‘I P’ screen. This setting corresponds to the output range of the Hall Effect Sensor. •/ Press ‘F’ to change this setting and to select required output. NOTE: The default setting is ‘0’ for 4-20mA/0-±5V. The other mode is ‘1’ for 4-12-20mA/0-±4V. •/ Press ‘V/A’ to confirm this setting; the cursor will stop flashing at this point SET Why is my AcuDC 243 measuring the wrong current with the shunt I am using? / The shunt should be installed on the negative side of the load. / Ensure that the AcuDC 243 is wired correctly to the shunt so that it can be read accurately. / The positive output from the shunt should be connected to the AcuDC 243 ‘I+’ terminal. / The negative output from the shunt should be connected to the ‘AcuDC 243 ‘I-‘terminal. / If the voltage is also being measured ensure that the positive DC source is connected to the AcuDC 243 ‘V+’ terminal whiles the AcuDC 243 ‘V-‘ terminal should be connected to the ‘I-‘ terminal on the AcuDC 243. / Ensure that the shunt being used outputs a signal in the range of 50-100mV to work with the meters current input. / Check that the settings in the meter are configured to read accurately from the shunt. / Press ‘F’ and ‘V/A’ simultaneously whiles on the meter data mode to get to the settings mode. V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 61 V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters / A password screen will display. Leave the password as default ‘0000’ and press ‘V/A’ to enter the setting mode; the communication address ‘AddR’ screen will display next. / Press ‘V/A’ until you get to the ‘I In’ screen. Enter the rated current input of the shunt in this screen. / Press ‘F’ to change this setting. A digit will begin to flash and you will enter the edit mode. / Press ‘F’ to increase the value of the flashing digit / Press ‘V/A’ to switch the flashing digit / Press ‘V/A’ when on the last digit to confirm the change; the cursor will stop flashing at this point. SET / Press ‘V/A’ to go to the next screen. This will be the ‘I o’ screen. This setting corresponds to the output range of the shunt. / Press ‘F’ to change this setting. The first digit will begin to flash and you will enter the edit mode. / Press ‘F’ to increase the value of the flashing digit / Press ‘V/A’ to switch the flashing digit / Press ‘V/A’ when on the last digit to confirm the change; the cursor will stop flashing at this point SET Why won’t my meter connect to the AcuView software? / The physical connection of the device is incorrect, please refer to section 2.3.6; / The communication parameters, such as Baud Rate, Parity, device type, device address are not properly selected the same as the meter. / The “Com Port” in the software is not selected as the same as the computer. Please refer to section 5.1.2. 621.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 accuenergy.com accuenergy.com Appendix B. Modbus Register Map This chapter will discuss how to operate the meter via the communication port using software. Before starting this chapter, you should be familiar with Modbus and read other chapters of this manual to make sure that you have a good understanding of the functions and applications of this product. This chapter includes: Modbus protocol, communication format and communication address table. B.1 MODBUS-RTU Protocol Modbus RTU protocol is used for AcuDC 240’s communication. Data format and error check methods are defined in Modbus protocol. The half duplex query and respond mode is adopted in Modbus protocol. Modbus allows master device (PC, PLC etc.) to communicate with slave devices, it will not allow data exchange between slave devices. Therefore, terminal devices will not engage the communication link at initialization, only response to the master’s request. B.1.1 Transmission Mode The mode of transmission defines the data structure within a frame and the rules used to transmit data. / Coding System 8 bit / Start Bit 1 bit / Data Bits 8bits / Parity Even/ Odd/ None2/ None1 / Stop Bit 1/2bit / Error Checking CRC V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 63 V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters B.1.2 Modbus Protocol 1. Frame When data frame reaches the terminal unit, the unit removes the data frame’s header, reads the data, if there is no error, it’ll implement the data’s task. Afterwards, the unit puts its own data with the acquired header, and sends back the frame to the sender. The response data frame contains: Address, Data and CRC Check. Any error will cause a failure to respond. Table B-1 Data Frame Format Address Function Data Check 8-Bits 8-Bits N X 8-Bits 16-Bits 2. Address Field The address field is at the start of the frame. It is composed of 1 byte (8 bits), its decimal value range is 0~255. A master addresses a slave by placing the slave address in the address field of the message. When the slave sends its response, it places its own address in this address field of the response to let the master know which slave is responding. 3. Function Field When a message is sent from a master to a slave device, the function code field tells the slave what kind of action to perform. Table B-2 Function Code Code Meaning Action 01 Read RO Status Obtain Relay Output Current Status (ON/OFF) 02 Read DI status Obtain Digital Input Current Status(ON/OFF) 03 Read holding register Obtain Current Binary Value of One or Multiple Registers 05 Control RO Control Relay Output(ON/OFF)) 16 Preset multiple registers Place Specific Binary Value into Multiple Registers 641.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 accuenergy.com accuenergy.com Appendix 4. Data Field Data field contains the data that terminals need to complete the request and the data that terminals respond to the request. This Data may be a numerical value, address or setting. For example, Function Code tells the terminal to read one register, Data Field needs to specify from which register and how many registers to read. 5. Error Check Field The field allows the error check by master and slave devices. Due to electrical noise and other interfaces, a group of data may be changed while transmitting from one location to the other. Error Check ensures master or slave devices do not respond to the distorted data during the transmission, which enhance the system security and efficiency. Error Check uses 16-bit Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC 16). 6. CRC Check Every message includes an error checking field which is based on the Cyclical Redundancy Check(CRC) method. The CRC field checks the contents of the entire message. It is applied regardless of any parity check method used for the individual characters of the message. The CRC field is two bytes long, containing a 16-bit binary value. The CRC value is calculated by the transmitting device, and is appended to the message. The receiving device recalculates the CRC value during reception of the message, and compares the calculated value to the actual value it received in the CRC field. An error will be reported if the two values are not equal. CRC calculation is first started by preloading the whole 16-bit register to 1’s. The process begins by applying successive 8-bit bytes of the message to the current contents of the register. Only the eight bits of data in each character are used for generating the CRC. Start and stop bits, and the parity bit, do not apply to the CRC. When generating the CRC, each 8-bit character is exclusive ORed with the register contents. The result is shifted towards the least significant bit (LSB), with a zero filled into the most significant bit (MSB) position. The LSB is extracted and examined, if the LSB equals to 1, the register is exclusive ORed with a preset, fixed value; if the LSB equals to 0, no action will be taken. This process is repeated until eight shifts have been performed. After the last (eighth) shift, the next 8-bit byte is exclusive ORed with the register’s current value, and the process repeats for eight more shifts as described above. The final contents of the register, after all the bytes of the message have been applied, the final contents of the register, which should exchange the high-byte and low-byte, is the CRC value. When the CRC is appended to the message, the low-order byte is appended first, followed by the high-order byte. V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 65 V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters B.2 Communication Format This section will illustrate the format indicated in Table B-3. Table B-3 Protocol Illustration (Hex value and Decimal value) Addr Fun Data Start Reg Hi Addr: Slave device address Data start reg hi: Start register address, high byte Data start reg lo: Start register address, low byte Data# of reg hi: Number of registers, high byte Data# of reg lo: Number of registers, low byte CRC 16 hi: CRC high byte CRC 16 lo: CRC low byte B.2.1 Read Relay Output Status (Function Code 01) Query The master device sends query frame to the slave device. Function Code 01 allows users to acquire the relay output status (1=ON, 0=OFF) of the slave device with the specified address. Along with slave device address and function code, query frame must contain the relay register starting address and the number of registers to be read. AcuDC 240 relay output address starts from 0000H (Relay 1=0000H, Relay 2=0001H). Table B.4 depicts reading Relay 1 and 2 statuses from slave address 17. Table B-4 Query Frame of Reading Relay Output Status 661.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 Data Start Reg Lo Data # of Regs Hi Data # of Regs Lo CRC16 Hi CRC 16 Lo Hex 06H 03H 00H 00H 00H 21H 84H 65H Dec 6 3 0 0 0 33 132 101 Addr Fun Data Start Reg Hi Data Start Reg Lo Data # of Regs Hi Data # of Regs Lo CRC16 Hi CRC 16 Lo Hex 11H 01H 00H 00H 00H 02H BFH 5BH Dec 17 1 0 0 0 2 191 91 accuenergy.com accuenergy.com Appendix Response The slave device answers the master device’s query. The response frame contains slave device address, function code, data quantity and CRC check. Each relay utilizes one bit (1=ON, 0=OFF). Table B-5 depicts the response frame. Table B-5 Response Frame of Reading Relay Output Status Addr Fun Byte Count Data CRC16 Hi CRC 16 Lo Hex 11H 01H 01H 02H D4H 89H Dec 17 1 1 2 212 137 Data Bytes 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 (Relay 1=OFF, Relay 2=ON) B.2.2 Read DI Status (Function Code 02) Query This function allows the user to obtain DI status ON/OFF (1=ON, 0=OFF). On top of slave device address and function code, query frame must contain the digital input register, starting address and the number of registers to be read. AcuDC 240 DI address starts from 0000H (DI1-0000H, DI2-0001H). Table B.6 depicts reading DI1 to DI2 status of the slave device with the address of 17. Table B-6 Query Frame of Reading DI Status Addr Fun Data Start Reg Hi Data Start Reg Lo Data # of Regs Hi Data # of Regs Lo CRC16 Hi CRC 16 Lo Hex 11H 02H 00H 00H 00H 02H FBH 5BH Dec 17 2 0 0 0 2 251 91 V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 67 V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters Response The slave device answers the master device’s query. The response frame contains slave device address, function code, data quantity and CRC check. Each DI utilizes one bit (1=ON, 0=OFF). Table B-7 depicts the response frame. Table B-7 Response Frame of Reading DI Status Addr Fun Byte Count Data CRC16 Hi CRC 16 Lo Hex 11H 02H 01H 01H 64H 88H Dec 17 2 1 1 251 136 B.2.3 Read Data (Function Code 03) Query This function allows the master to obtain the measurement results from the meter. Table B.6 depicts reading slave device (address 1) voltage. The AcuDC 240 voltage address is 0200H-0201H. Table B-8 Query Frame of Reading Voltage Addr Fun Data Start Reg Hi Response Response frame contains slave device address, function code, data quantity and CRC check. Table B-9 depicts the response of V=402851D8H (2.6299953V) Table B-9 Response Frame of Reading Voltage 681.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 Data Start Reg Lo Data # of Regs Hi Data # of Regs Lo CRC16 Hi CRC 16 Lo Hex 01H 03H 02H 00H 00H 02H C5H B3H Dec 1 3 2 0 0 2 197 179 Addr Fun Byte Count Data1 Hi Data1 Lo Data2 Hi Data2 Lo CRC16 Hi CRC 16 Lo Hex 01H 03H 04H 40H 28H 51H D8H 52H 31H Dec 1 3 4 64 40 81 216 82 49 accuenergy.com accuenergy.com Appendix B.2.4 Control Relay Output (Function Code 05) Query This query frame forces the rely status to ON or OFF. The AcuDC 240 relay output address starts from 0000H(Relay 1= 0000H, Relay 2= 0001H). Data FF00H changes the relay status to ON, data 0000H changes the relay status to OFF. The relay will not be influenced by any other data input. The following is to query slave device 1 to set relay status as ON. Table B-10 Query Frame of Control Relay Status Addr Fun DO Addr Hi DO Addr Lo Value Hi Value Lo CRC16 Hi CRC 16 Lo Hex 01H 05H 00H 00H FFH 00H 8CH 3AH Dec 1 5 0 0 255 0 140 58 Response The correct response to this request is to send back the received data after the relay status is changed. Table B-11 Response Frame of Control Relay Status Addr Fun DO Addr Hi DO Addr Lo Value Hi Value Lo CRC16 Hi CRC 16 Lo Hex 01H 05H 00H 00H FFH 00H 8CH 3AH Dec 1 5 0 0 255 0 140 58 V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 69 V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters B.2.5 Read Data (Function Code 03) Query Function Code 16 (10 H Hex) allows the user to modify the contents of multiple registers. AcuDC 240 system parameters can be written by this function code. The following example depicts how to preset slave device 1’s AO1 parameter (current), lower limit sign (+), lower limit value (0%), upper limit sign(+), upper limit value (100%) Table B-12 Query Frame of Preset Multiple Registers Addr Fun Data Start Reg Hi Response The correct response is to send back the address, function code; data starting address, data number, CRC check after the value is changed. Table B-13 Preset Multiple Registers Response 701.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 Data Start Reg Lo Data # of Regs Hi Data # of Regs Lo Byte Count Value 1 Hi Value 1 Lo Hex 01H 10H 01H 09H 00H 05H 0AH 00H 01H Dec 1 1 9 0 5 10 0 1 Value 2 Hi Value 2 Lo Value 3 Hi Value 3 Lo Value 4 Hi Value 4 Lo Value 5 Hi Value 5 Lo CRC 16 Hi CRC 16 Lo 00H 00H 00H 00H 00H 00 00H 64H C5H 8AH 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 100 197 138 Addr Fun Data Start Reg Hi Data Start Reg Lo Data # of Regs Hi Data # of Regs Lo CRC 16 Hi CRC 16 Lo Hex 01H 10H 01H 09H 00H 05H D1H F4H Dec 1 16 1 9 0 5 209 244 accuenergy.com accuenergy.com Appendix B.3 AcuDC240 Communication Address Table Basic Measurement Parameter Address Use Function Code 03 to read Table 5-14 Real-Time Measurement Address Table Address (Hex) Address (dec) Parameter Data Type Property 0200H- 0201H 512- 513 Voltage Float R 0202H- 0203H 514- 515 Current Float R 0204H- 0205H 516- 517 Power Float R 0206H- 0207H 518- 519 AO1 Float R 0208H- 0209H 520- 521 AO2 Float R 020AH- 020BH 522- 523 DI1 Count Value UINT32 R 020CH- 020DH 524- 525 DI2 Count Value UINT32 R NOTE: The high byte is followed by the low byte. Running Time The data space below is for running time; function code: 03 Read. Table B-15 Running Time Address Table Address (Hex) Address (dec) Parameter Range Data Type Property 0280H-0281H 640- 641 Meter run- ning time 0 ~ 999999999 long R 0282H- 0283H 642- 643 Load run- ning time 0 ~ 999999999 long R V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 71 V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters Energy The data space below is for energy; Function Code: 03 Read; 16 Write Table B-16 Energy and Charge (Ah) Address Table Address (Hex) Address (dec) Parameter Range Data Type Property 0300H- 0301H 768- 769 Import energy 0 ~ 999999999 long R/W 0302H- 0303H 770- 771 Export energy 0 ~ 999999999 long R/W 0304H- 0305H 772- 773 Total energy 0 ~ 999999999 long R/W 0306H- 0307H 774- 775 Net energy 0 ~ ± 999999999 long R/W 0308H- 0309H 776- 777 Import Ah 0 ~ 999999999 long R/W 030AH- 030BH 778- 779 Export Ah 0 ~ 999999999 long R/W 030CH- 030DH 780- 781 Total Ah 0 ~ 999999999 long R/W 030EH- 030FH 782- 783 Net Ah 0 ~ ± 999999999 long R/W The relationship between the register value and the real value (Rx is the register value). Table B-17 The relationship between Register Value and Real Value Parameter Relationship Unit Voltage Real=Rx V Current Real=Rx A Power Real=Rx kW Energy Real=Rx/100 kWh Ah Real=Rx/100 Ah AO Real=Rx V or mA(depends on the AO Type) Running Time Real=Rx/100 Hour 721.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 accuenergy.com accuenergy.com Appendix Real-Time Clock Area (Data obtained only by AcuDC 243 meter equipped with storage function.) Table B-18 Real Time Clock Address Table Address (Hex) Address (dec) Parameter Range Data Type Property 0284H 644 Year 2000 ~ 2099 Word R/W 0285H 645 Month 1 ~ 12 Word R/W 0286H 646 Day 1 ~ 31 Word R/W 0287H 647 Hour 0 ~ 59 Word R/W 0288H 648 Minute 0 ~ 59 Word R/W 0289H 649 Second 0 ~ 59 Word R/W MAX records (Data obtained only by AcuDC 243 meter equipped with storage function.) Function code: 03H for reading Table B-19 MAX Records Address Table Address (Hex) Parameter Range Data Type Property 0400H- 0401H Voltage MAX Float R 0402H Time of occurrence, Year, Month, Day, Hour, Minute, Second High byte: year; low byte: month 0403H High byte: day; low byte: hour Word R 0404H High byte: minute; low byte: second 0405H- 0406H Current MAX Float R 0407H Time of occurrence, Year, Month, Day, Hour, Minute, Second High byte: year; low byte: month 0408H High byte: day; low byte: hour Word R 0409H High byte: minute; low byte: second 040AH- 040BH Power MAX Float R 040CH Time of occurrence, Year, Month, Day, Hour, Minute, Second High byte: year; low byte: month 040DH High byte: day; low byte: hour Word R 040EH High byte: minute; low byte: second V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 73


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PDF Content Summary: 3M Occupational Health & Environmental Safety Group 3M 8300 Series Comfort Respirators Respirator Type APF VALVE 8310 FFP1 NR D 4 8312 FFP1 NR D 4 FFP2 NR D 10 8322 FFP2 NR D 10 / 8833 FFP3 R D 20 / Standard: EN149:2001 + A1:2009 This respirator should not be used in oxygen deficient environments, for escape purposes or by people with beards/ facial hair or in atmospheres where concentrations of contaminant may exceed that deemed Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health (IDLH). Occupational Health & Environmental Safety Group 3M United Kingdom plc 3M Centre, Cain Road, Bracknell Berkshire RG12 8HT Tel: 0870 60 800 60 3M.co.uk/ohes / 8320 3M Ireland Limited The Iveagh Building The Park Carrickmines Dublin 18 Tel: 1 800 320 500 Please recycle. Printed in UK. © 3M 2009. All rights reserved. 3MTM 8300 Series Comfort Respirators Fitting Instructions CH8300FP V2 1 3 1. Cup the respirator in your hand with the nosepiece at your fingertips allowing the headbands to hang freely below your hand. 2. Position the respirator under your chin with the nosepiece up. 3. Pull the top strap over your head resting it high at the top back of your head. Pull the bottom strap over your head and position it around the neck below the ears. Make sure that the straps are not twisted. 4. Place the fingertips of both hands at the top of the metal nosepiece. Mould the nosepiece to the shape of your nose by pushing inward while moving your fingertips down both sides of the nosepiece. Pinching the nosepiece using one hand may result in less effective respirator performance. 5. The seal of the respirator on the face should be fit checked prior to wearing in the work area. Fit Testing: The 3M 8300 Series Respirator is a tight fitting facepiece and therefore wearers require a fit test as per the COSHH regulations 2002. For qualitative testing - 3MTM FT10 and FT30 Fit Test Kits are available. 2 Fit Check Procedure For Valved Respirators: a) Cover the front of the respirator with both hands, being careful not to disturb the position of the respirator. b) Inhale sharply. A negative pressure should be felt inside the respirator. If air leaks around the nose, readjust the noseclip as described in step 4 to eliminate leakage. Repeat the above fit check. If air leaks at the respirator edges, work the straps back along the sides of the head to eliminate leakage. Retest the seal. Repeat the procedure until the respirator fits properly. For Unvalved Respirators: a) Cover the front of the respirator with both hands, being careful not to disturb the position of the respirator. b) Exhale sharply. A positive pressure should be felt inside the respirator. If air leaks around the nose, readjust the noseclip as described in step 4 to eliminate leakage. Repeat the above fit check. If air leaks at the respirator edges, work the straps back along the sides of the head to eliminate leakage. Retest the seal. Repeat the procedure until the respirator fits properly. If you cannot achieve a proper fit, do not enter the contaminated area. See your supervisor. Note: Do not use with beards or other facial hair that may inhibit contact between the face and the edge of the respirator. 44 55


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PDF Content Summary: ACUDC 240 D C P O W E R & E N E R G Y M E T E R AcuDC 240 Series Power and Energy Meter User's Manual II PLEASE NOTE This manual may not be altered or reproduced in whole or in part by any means without the expressed written consent of ACCUENERGY. The information contained in this document is believed to be accurate at the time of publication, however, ACCUENERGY assumes no responsibility for any errors which may appear here and reserves the right to make changes without notice. Please ask the local representative for latest product specifications before ordering (contact information please see the following page). Windows®, Windows® Vista, Windows® 7, Windows® 8, and Windows® XP are registered trademarks of Microsoft Corporation. CUSTOMER SERVICE AND SUPPORT ACCUENERGY provides technical support Monday through Friday between 8:30AM and 5:00PM (EST). However, this manual provides a trouble shooting section in the Appendix that may provide a quicker solution than over the phone consultation. You can contact ACCUENERGY for support at: TF: 1-877-721-8908 INT: +1-416-497-4100 E: support@accuenergy.com When contacting ACCUENERGY please have the following prepared: / Meter’s part number + serial number (Both found on a sticker at the side of the meter)Multiple CT Input Options compatible with any CT: 5A/1A, 333mV, Flexible Rogowski Coil, 80/100/200mA / Hardware Version + Firmware Version(Refer to the Appendix C, ordering information) / A detailed problem description. PRODUCT WARRANTY ACCUENERGY provides a 5 year limited warranty for its products. 1. The warranty strictly covers manufacturing defects in material and workmanship in products bought with in United States and Canada. The warranty is valid from the date of purchase by the original purchaser and for a period of 60 months.Hardware Version + Firmware Version(Refer to the Appendix C, ordering information) 2. Exclusions: a) Damage or failure caused by abuse, misuse, faulty installation and operation, improper or inadequate maintenance, and any repair or guarantee on repairs not carried out by ACCUENERGY. b) Damage resulting from inadequate packaging or carrier mishandling of returned products. c) All products purchased outside United States of American and Canada. 3. It is original purchaser’s responsibility to provide a dated proof of purchase. The warranty is not transferable. 4. ACCUENERGY will at its sole discretion repair or exchange a product under warranty. No credit will be issued. 5. THE WARRANTY IS VOID WHEN: a) The product serial number has been altered or removed. b) The product has been altered, service or manipulated by anyone other than ACCUENERGY or without the prior written authorization of ACCUENERGY. 6. All shipping charges must be pre-paid by the sender. ACCUENERGY will, at its own expense, ship back the warranted repaired product to the sender anywhere within the United States and Canada. We will ship best way at our discretion. 7. To secure your warranty coverage, contact ACCUENERGY to obtain the registration card that must be filled out and sent or faxed back to ACCUENERGY with a copy of a dated proof of purchase. Products under warranty receive priority for repairs. III IV ABOUT ACCUENERGY Formed in 1998, Accuenergy is a leading producer of power and energy metering products for the distribution, control and management of electrical energy and other dynamic processes. Accuenergy’s vision is to make energy usage more dependable and efficient, and to make energy management more convenient and intelligent. Accuenergy products are easily integrated into new and existing energy management, automation and building control systems for intelligent and user-friendly energy systems and are backed by an industry-leading pre and post sale technical support and manufacturer’s warranty. With an emphasis on continuous improvement, innovation and high performance and cost-effective solutions, Accuenergy has developed a growing global footprint with offices in Toronto Canada (Headquarter), Los Angeles and Beijing. WARNINGS GLOSSARY The following symbols in this manual and on AcuDC 240 series meters are used to provide warning of danger or risk during the installation and operation of the meters. Electric Shock Symbol: Carries information about procedures which must be followed to reduce the risk of electric shock and danger to personal health. When this symbol is seen on the meter, consult this user manual. Refer to Chapter 2 for important safety information regarding mounting and wiring of the AcuDC meter. Safety Alert Symbol: Carries information about circumstances which if not considered may result in injury or death. Note: Please read this manual carefully before installation, operation and maintenance of an AcuDC 240 series meter. Installation and maintenance of the AcuDC 240 meter should only be performed by qualified, competent professionals who have received training and should have experience with high voltage and current devices. ACCUENERGY shall not be responsible or liable for any damages caused by improper meter installation and/or operation. TABLE OF CONTENTS CUSTOMER SERVICE AND SUPPORT .....................................................................II PRODUCT WARRANTY .................................................................................................III CHAPTER 1: Introduction to the AcuDC ................................................................1 1.1 Package Contents & Available Accessories ..............................................1 1.2 Introduction and Compliance ......................................................................1 1.2.1 Introduction ........................................................................................................................1 1.2.2 Compliance ........................................................................................................................2 1.3 Applications & Industries ................................................................................2 1.4 Features & Specifications ...............................................................................3 1.4.1 Features .................................................................................................................................3 1.4.2 Specifications ....................................................................................................................3 CHAPTER 2: Installation - Physical Setup............................................................7 2.1 Tools .........................................................................................................................7 2.1.1 Tools for Mounting ..........................................................................................................7 2.1.2 Tools for Wiring ................................................................................................................7 2.2 Mounting ..............................................................................................................7 2.2.1 Tools for Mounting..........................................................................................................8 2.2.2 Mounting I/O Modules Onto Meter ......................................................................9 2.3 Wiring .......................................................................................................................................12 2.3.1 Wiring Control Power ....................................................................................................13 2.3.2 Current Input Wiring ....................................................................................................14 2.3.3 Voltage Input Wiring ....................................................................................................16 2.3.4 Current & Voltage Wiring at the Same Time ...................................................17 2.3.5 Communications Wiring .............................................................................................20 2.4 Removing meter for servicing or maintenance ...................................21 CHAPTER 3: Installation - Configuration Parameter Set-up via display .............24 3.1 Display Panel and Keys ....................................................................................24 3.2 General Parameter Setup ...............................................................................25 3.2.1 Key’s Function in parameters setup .....................................................................26 3.2.2 Configure AcuDC to work with Shunt.................................................................26 3.2.3 Configure AcuDC to work with Current Hall Effect Sensor .....................27 3.2.4 Configure AcuDC to work with Current and Voltage Hall Effect Sensor 283.2.5 Clear Energy, Ah and DI Counter ...........................................................................29 V VI 3.2.6 Set Backlight Brightness ............................................................................................30 3.2.7 Meter Clock Setting ......................................................................................................30 3.2.8 Password Setting ............................................................................................................31 3.3 AcuDC Communication Setup .....................................................................31 3.4 I/O Parameter Setup.........................................................................................32 3.4.1 Meter Clock Setting .......................................................................................................32 3.4.2 RO parameter setting ..................................................................................................34 CHAPTER 4: Viewing Metering Parameters – VIA Display ............................40 4.1 General Display on the AcuDC ......................................................................40 4.2 View the Meter and Load Running Time .................................................43 4.3 View the serial number from the meter ..................................................44 CHAPTER 5: Viewing Real-time Readings Via AcuView Software ...........46 5.1 Connection Setup ..............................................................................................46 5.1.1 Wiring .....................................................................................................................................46 5.1.2 Acuview Software Setup .............................................................................................46 5.2 Configuration Parameters Setup ................................................................49 5.2.1 General Meter Parameter Setting ..........................................................................49 5.2.2 Configure the Data Log using the meter’s onboard memory ...............51 5.2.3 Configure the data log to log the readings on the computer’s memory 53 5.3 Viewing Metering Parameters ......................................................................56 5.3.1 Real-Time Metering .......................................................................................................56 5.3.2 Reading Data Log on Meter’s Onboard Memory ..........................................57 5.3.3 Reading Data Log on the computer’s memory .............................................58 APPENDIX ..........................................................................................................................60 A. Troubleshooting ..................................................................................................60 B. Modbus Register Map ........................................................................................63 B.1 MODBUS-RTU Protocol ...................................................................................................63 B.2 Communication Format ................................................................................................66 B.3 AcuDC240 Communication Address Table .........................................................71 C. Ordering Information ........................................................................................83 D. Glossary of Definitions ......................................................................................84 AcuDC 240 Series DC Power and Energy Meters Chapter 1: Introduction to AcuDC 1.1 Package Contents + Available Accessories 1.2 Introduction and Compliance 1.2.1 Introduction 1.2.2 Compliance 1.3 Applications & Industries 1.4 Features & Specifications 1.4.1 Features 1.4.2 Specifications Chapter 1: Introduction to AcuDC CHAPTER 1: INTRODUCTION TO THE ACUDC 1.1 Package Contents & Available Accessories When you open the package, you will find the following items: 1. AcuDC 240 Meter X1 2. Terminal Blocks X1 - X3 (Depending on model) 3. Installation Clips X4 (Already assembled to the meter) Available Accessories: I/O modules (Combinations of digital I/O, analog I/O and relay output) Current transformers USB to Serial Converters 1.2 Introduction and Compliance 1.2.1 Introduction Powerful Yet Cost-Effective AcuDC 240 series monitors DC voltage, current, power and energy. It supports bi- directional current measurement, and also displays meter running hour and load running hour. Analog Output applies to DCS system, industrial monitoring and control. AcuDC 240 has a combination of accurate measurement, intelligent multifunction and simple human machine interface. The cost-effective meter fulfills the requirements of monitoring and controlling the DC circuit. Compact and Easy to Install The dimensions of AcuDC 240 series meet DIN 72X72 requirements. With a mounting depth of 65mm, the meter can even fit in small drawer type cabinets. It utilizes a self-lock installation mechanism, eliminating the necessary of fix bolts, which makes installation or removal quick and convenient. User Friendly Interface AcuDC 240 series utilizes a clear high-definition LCD screen with large characters. The LCD screen comes with a brightness adjustable backlight, which ensures easy observation of metering data in any environment. With a large LCD screen display, the two keys on the meter from allow users to observe multiple parameter data at the same time. The meter parameter settings can be set either via front panel keys or the communication port. The Parameter settings are saved in the non-volatile EEPROM, which remains when power is off. accuenergy.com

V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 1 AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters

High Safety and Reliability AcuDC 240 series meter was designed according to industrial standards. It can run reliably under high power disturbance conditions. This meter has been fully tested for EMC and safety compliance in accordance with multiple international standards. The casing is highly fire resistant due to high quality, durable engineering plastics. 1.2.2 Compliance The following table lists the compliances this meter meets:

Safety Conforms to UL Std 61010-1 Certified to CSA Std C22/2 No. 61010-1 CE certified. Quality Control Certified to ISO 9001:2008 standard Environmental IEC 60068-2; Nema3 Certified IP54 Certified 1.3 Applications & Industries Applications: / DC meter & metering Metering of DC consumption and generation of different DC electrical systems / DC transducer Installed transducer reads power, energy, voltage, current and amp hour data and outputs digital pulse and/or analog signals / DC data logger / data logging Installed meter reads, records and stores power, energy, voltage, current and amp hour data for subsequent download, reporting and analysis Industries: / Renewable energy & green systems Generation by solar photovoltaic (PV) arrays, wind turbines, inverter & battery monitoring, DC consumption of electric vehicle (EV) charging stations / Transportation Systems Consumption of rail / railway, subway and trains and transit systems and related DC equipment / Telecommunications Consumption on cell / cellular towers and equipment / Datacenters Consumption of data centers and equipment 2 V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 accuenergy.com

Chapter 1: Introduction to AcuDC 1.4 Features & Specifications 1.4.1 Features DC power system metering; Monitor and control power switches; Alarming and analog output; Standard 72x72mm, allows for drawer type panel installation; Three line high-definition LCD display; Accessible with SCADA, PLC systems; Easy installation, simple wiring; Data Logging: Offers 3 configurable historical logs where the all of the metering parameters can be recorded. The onboard memory is up to 4 MB and each log size is adjustable. 1.4.2 Specifications The following tables list the specifications of AcuDC 240 meter. Parameter Accuracy Resolution Range Voltage 0.2% 0.001 V 0~1200 V Current 0.2% 0.001 A 0~±50000 A Power 0.5% 0.001 kW 0~±60000 kW Energy 0.5% 0.01 kWh 0~9999999.99 kWh Drift with Temperature <100ppm / °C Stability 0.5‰/year Voltage Input Range Voltage Direct Input0~1000V; Via Hall Effect Sensor0~1200V Input Impedance 2MΩ Load <0.6W Accuracy 0.2% accuenergy.com

V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 3

AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters Voltage Current 0~±10A(Direct Input, pick up current 0.01A) Input Range 0~±50000A(Via Shunt or Hall Effect Sensor, program- mable range) Shunt 50~100mV(programmable) Hall Effect Sensor 0~±5V/0-±4V, 4~20mA/12mA±8mA Power Consumption 2W(MAX) Accuracy 0.2% Digital Input Type Dry Contact Isolation Voltage 2500Vac Environment Operation Temperature -25°C ~ +70°C Storage Temperature -40°C ~ +85°C Humidity 5%~95%Non-condensing Output Relay Output (RO) Type Mechanical contact, Form A Max Load Voltage 250Vac/30Vdc Max Load Current 3A On Resistance 100mΩ (Max) Isolation Voltage 4000Vac Mechanical Life 5 × 106 times Digital Output (Photo-Mos) Load Voltage Range 0~250Vac/dc Load Current 100mA(Max) Max Output Frequency 25Hz, 50% duty cycle Isolation Voltage 2500Vac Analog Output (AO) Load Voltage Range 4-20mA/0~20mA; 0~5V/1-5V Load Current 0.5% Max Output Frequency Current type, max load resistance: 750 Ohm Voltage type, max load current: 20 mA 4 V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 accuenergy.com

Chapter 1: Introduction to AcuDC accuenergy.com Communication Type RS485, half duplex, Optical Isolated Protocol Modbus-RTU Baud Rate 1200~38400bps Isolation Voltage 2500VAC Power Relay Supply Input (P1)100-240Vac, 50/60Hz, 100-300Vdc (P2) 20-60Vdc Consumption 3W (typical value) Installation 72 x 72 mm Panel mounted Table 1-3 lists the functions of AcuDC240 series. Table 1-3 AcuDC 240 Series Function AcuDC 241 AcuDC 242 AcuDC 243 Metering Voltage V / / Current I / / Power P / Energy E / Ampere -Hour Ah / I/O ○ ○ ○ 2DI+2RO ○ ○ ○ 2DI+2DO ○ ○ ○ 2DI+ ±15Vdc ○ ○ ○ Data Logging 2DI+2AO Support DI Count All metering parameters can be recorded (Voltage, Current, Power, Energy, Ampere-hour, DI Count); Interval 1 minute; Can record 4 months ○ Communication RS485, Modbus RTU ○ ○ ○ Display LCD / / / Dimensions 72×72×64.5mm (Cutout: 68x68 mm) / 2.835 x 2.835 x 2.539 inch (Cutout: 2.677 x 2.677 inch) V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 5

AcuDC 240 Series DC Power and Energy Meters Chapter 2: Installation - Physical Setup 2.1 Tools 2.1.1 Tools for Mounting 2.1.2 Tools for Wiring 2.2 Mounting 2.2.1 How to choose installation place 2.2.2 Mounting I/O modules onto meter 2.2.3 Mounting meter onto switchboard panel 2.3 Wiring 2.3.1 Wiring Control Power 2.3.2 Current input wiring 2.3.3 Voltage input wiring 2.3.4 Current & Voltage wiring at the same time 2.3.5 I/O Module wiring 2.3.6 Communications wiring 2.4 Removing meter for servicing or maintenance accuenergy.com Chapter 2: Installation - Physical Setup CHAPTER 2: INSTALLATION - PHYSICAL SETUP 2.1 Tools 2.1.1 Tools for Mounting / #2 Flathead Screwdriver / Wire Cutters 2.1.2 Tools for Wiring / A 1A/250Vac circuit breaker for the auxiliary power supply loopWire Cutters / A 1A/250Vac circuit breaker should be used in the voltage input loop. / Choice of wire of power supply is AWG22-16 or 0.6-1.5mm2 / The wire for voltage input is AWG16-12 or 1.3-2.0mm2 / The wire size of current input is AWG15-10 or 1.5-2.5mm2 The following may be required: / If using RS485 for communication, use a good quality shielded twisted pair cable, AWG22 (0.5mm2) or higher / The wire of digital input should be chosen between AWG22~16 or 0.5~ 1.3mm2 / The wire of relay output should be chosen between AWG22~16 or 0.5~1.3mm2 / The wire of the digital output circuit should be chosen between AWG22~16 or 0.5~1.3 mm2 2.2 Mounting Considerations When Installing Meters / Installation of the meter must be performed by qualified personnel only, and should follow standard safety precautions through the installation procedures. Those personnel should have appropriate training and experience with high voltage devices. Appropriate safety gloves, safety glasses and protective clothing are recommended. / During normal operation, dangerous voltage may be present in many parts of the meter, including terminals, and any connected I/O (Inputs and Outputs) modules and their circuits. All primary and secondary circuits can, at times, produce lethal voltages. AVOID contact with any current-carrying surfaces. / The meter and its I/O output channels are NOT designed as primary protection devices and shall NOT be used as primary circuit protection or in an energy limiting capacity. The meter and its I/O output channels can only be used as secondary protection. AVOID using the meter under situations where failure of the meter may cause injury or death. AVOID using the meter for any application where risk of fire may occur. V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 7 V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 8AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters / All meter terminals should be inaccessible after installation. / Applying more than the maximum voltage the meter and/or its modules can withstand will permanently damage the meter and/or its modules. Please refer to the specifications in section 1.4.1 for all devices before applying voltages. NOTE: If the equipment is used in a manner not specified by the manufacturer, the protection provided by the equipment may be impaired. NOTE: There is no required preventive maintenance or inspection necessary for safety. However, any repair or maintenance should be performed by the factory. DISCONNECT DEVICE: The following part is considered the equipment disconnect device. A switch or circuit- breaker shall be included in the installation. The switch shall be in close proximity to the equipment and within easy reach of the operator. The switch shall be marked as the disconnecting device for the equipment. 2.2.1 Tools for Mounting Note: Before installation, please check the environment, temperature and humidity to ensure the AcuDC 240 series meter is being placed in a proper place. 1. Temperature AcuDC 240 operation temperature is -25°C ~ 70°C, which will accommodate most user applications. If a special temperature range is needed, please contact Accuenergy. Please Note: It can influence the meter life negatively if the meter operates under extremely high or extremely low temperature environments. AcuDC 240 storage temperature is -40°C ~ 85°C. 2. Humidity 5% to 95% non-condensing 3. Location AcuDC 240 series meter should be installed in a dry and dust free environment. Avoid exposing meter to excessive heat, radiation and high electrical noise sources. Alert Alert Alert accuenergy.com accuenergy.com Chapter 2: Installation - Physical Setup 2.2.2 Mounting I/O Modules Onto Meter If the meter is equipped with an I/O module, you need to mount the module onto meter before installing the meter. Installation Method With the link pins, I/O module is linked to the meter. 1. Insert the mounting clips to the counterpart of AcuDC 240 meter, and then press the I/O module lightly, so linking is established, as shown in Fig 2-2.

(A) (C) (B) (D) V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 9

V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters 2. Tighten the installation screws. Note: Install I/O Module carefully to avoid damage; under no circumstances should any installation be done with the meter powered on. Failure to do so may result in injury or death. 2.2.3 Mounting Meter Onto Switchboard Panel Appearance and DimensionsFig 2-3 AcuDC 240 Appearance Part Description 1. Casing High intensity fire resistant engineering plastics 2. Front Casing Visible portion after mounting onto a panel 3. Display Large LCD display 4. Key Two keys are used to select display and set 5. Voltage and Current Input Terminals Used for voltage and current input 6. Communication Terminals Communication output 7. I/O Module Optional I/O module 8. I/O Terminal Optional I/O terminals, including 2DI, 2AO/2RO 9. Power Supply Terminal Power supply terminal 10. Installation Clips Used for securing the meter to the panel 101.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 Table 2-1 Part Name of AcuDC 240 Fig 2-4 AcuDC 240 Dimensions accuenergy.com

accuenergy.com Chapter 2: Installation - Physical Setup Installation Steps AcuDC 240 series meter is generally installed into the switchboard panel. 1. Cut a square hole (Standard DIN). See figure 2-5 for dimensions. Unit:mm 2. Remove the clips (10) from the meter, and insert the meter into the square hole from the front side, as shown in following figures. Fig 2-5 Panel Cutout

a. Panel Cutout c. Putting back the Clips at the back of the Panel b. Inserting the Meter to the Panel Square Hole d. Installation Completed V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 11

V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters 2.3 Wiring Terminal Strips There are 3 groups of current terminal strips. There will be another terminal strip if the meter is connected with the I/O module. a. Voltage and Current Terminal Strip c. I/O Terminal Strip (2DI+2AO) e. I/O Terminal Strip (2DI+±15V) Safety Earth Connection Before setting up the meter’s wiring, please make sure that the switchgear has an earth ground terminal. Connect both the meters and the switchgear’s ground terminal together. This ground terminal symbol is used in this user’s manual. 121.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 Fig 2-7 AcuDC 240 Terminal Strip b. Power Supply Terminal Strip d. I/O Terminal Strip(2DI+2RO/2DO) f. Communication Terminal Strip accuenergy.com

accuenergy.com Chapter 2: Installation - Physical Setup 2.3.1 Wiring Control Power CAUTION: Make sure you check the power supply option you have before energizing the meter. Check the silver sticker on the side of the meter to confirm what power supply option you have. The silver sticker on the side of the meter contains information such as the model number, power supply, voltage/current inputs and serial number. To power the meter, you need to connect the power supply terminal as shown below. This will be connected based on the two power supply options available, that is:

1A FUSE 11L/+Power Supply 12N/- AcuDC 240 13 G

Fig 2-9 Power Supply Wiring 1. The Standard option: 100-240Vac, 50/60Hz or 100-300Vdc 2. The Low Voltage DC option: 20-60Vdc The independent power supply circuit loop must have a fuse or air circuit breaker. The fuse could be 1A/250Vac, time delay type. If circuit breaker is used, a CE certified product with compliance of IEC947 is recommended. Terminal G (13) must be connected to the ground for the safety. An isolated transformer or EMC filter should be used in the auxiliary power supply loop if power quality problem exists in the power supply, as shown in following figure.

1A FUSE LL11L/+Power Supply NN12N/- AcuDC 240 G G 13 13 G G G

EMC filter 2-10 Power Supply Wiring with EMC Filter Choice of wire power supply is AWG16-22 or 0.6-1.5 mm2. V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 13 V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters 2.3.2 Current Input Wiring AcuDC 240 meter current can be wired in three different ways: direct wiring, wiring using a shunt and wiring using a current Hall Effect sensor. NOTE: When wiring using a shunt or Hall Effect Sensor these must be wired on the negative terminal of the load that is being measured. Choice of wire current input is AWG15-16 or 1.5-2.5 mm2 or equivalent resistance wire. Fig 2-11a Wiring using a Shunt Fig 2-11b Direct Wiring 141.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 Vdc- Vdc+ Meter I/O terminal strip 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 DI11 DI12 DI21 DI22 NC V- GND V+ shunt Voltage, Current, Terminal Strip 6 45 23 1 I- I+ NC U- NC U+ Load I- I+ NC U- NC U+ Vdc- Vdc+ Meter I/O terminal strip 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 DI11 DI12 DI21 DI22 NC V- GND V+ Voltage, Current, Terminal Strip 123456 Load accuenergy.com accuenergy.com Chapter 2: Installation - Physical Setup Current Hall E ect Sensor Terminal I- I+ NC U- NC U+ Vdc- Vdc+ Meter Hall E ect Sensor I/O terminal strip 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 DI11 DI12 DI21 DI22 NC V- GND V+ 1Voltage, Current, Terminal Strip 2 3123456 4Load Fig 2-11 C Wiring using a Hall Effect Sensor Fig 2-11 Current Input Wiring Table 2-2 Accuenergy Line of Shunts/Hall Effect Sensors for Measuring Current Shunt (Works with AcuDC 243 A1 Current Input Option) NOTE: For measuring higher currents or larger window size openings, please contact Accuenergy’s Sales team. Hall Effect Sensor (Works with AcuDC 243 A2 Current Input Option) Rated Input: 50A Output: 75mV Rated Input: 50A Output: 4-20mA Window Size: 21mm Rated Input: 100A Output: 75mV Rated Input: 100A Output: 4-20mA Window Size: 21mm Rated Input: 200A Output: 75mV Rated Input: 200A Output: 4-20mA Window Size: 21mm Rated Input: 500A Output: 75mV Rated Input: 400A Output: 4-20mA Window Size: 40mm Rated Input: 1000A Output: 75mV Rated Input: 600A Output: 4-20mA Window Size: 40mm Rated Input: 1500A Output: 75mV Rated Input: 1000A Output: 4-20mA Window Size: 40mm Rated Input: 2000A Output: 75mV V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 15 V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters 2.3.3 Voltage Input Wiring AcuDC 240 series meter Voltage can be wired in two different ways: direct wiring and wiring using a voltage Hall Effect sensor. Choice of wire for the voltage input is AWG16-22 or 0.6~1.5 mm2. Please see the wiring diagrams for details as shown in fig 2-12. I- I+ NC U- NC U+ Fig 2-12a Wiring using a Voltage Hall Effect Sensor Fig2-12b-Direct Wiring Fig2-12-Voltage Input Wiring 161.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 Vdc- Vdc+ Meter I/O terminal strip Hall E ect Sensor 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 DI11 DI12 DI21 DI22 NC V- GND V+ + Voltage, Current, Terminal Strip -IN- MIN+ 123456 TMeter Voltage, Current, Terminal Strip I- I+ NC U- NC U+ Vdc- Vdc+ I/O terminal strip 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 DI11 DI12 DI21 DI22 NC V- GND V+ 6 5 4 3 2 1 Load accuenergy.com accuenergy.com Chapter 2: Installation - Physical Setup 2.3.4 Current & Voltage Wiring at the Same Time You can wire the voltage and current for different systems based on the different methods above. Here are the common wiring methods used: 1. Direct voltage connection and a direct current connection see 2-13a. 2. Direct voltage connection and a current connection using a shunt see 2-13b. 3. Direct voltage connection and a current connection using a current Hall Effect sensor see 2-13c. The different wiring diagrams are shown below: Meter Vdc- Vdc+ I/O terminal strip 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 DI11 DI12 DI21 DI22 NC V- GND V+ Voltage, Current, Terminal Strip 123456 I- I+ NC U- NC U+ Load Fig 2-13a Direct Wiring Vdc- Vdc+ Meter I/O terminal strip 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 DI11 DI12 DI21 DI22 NC V- GND V+ shunt Voltage, Current, Terminal Strip 6 5 4 23 1 I- I+ NC U- NC U+ Load Fig 2-13b Voltage and Current Wiring Using a Shunt V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 17 V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters Fig 2-13c Voltage and Current Wiring Using Current Hall Effect Sensor Fig 2-13 d Voltage and Current Wiring Using Hall Effect Sensors Fig 2-13-Typical Voltage and Current wiring diagram for systems 181.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 Vdc- Vdc+ Meter Hall E ect Sensor I/O terminal strip 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 DI11 DI12 DI21 DI22 NC V- GND V+ 1Voltage, Current, Terminal Strip 236 2345 1 4I- I+ NC U- NC U+ Load IN+ Hall E ect Sensor Vdc- Vdc+ Meter Voltage Hall E ect Sensors + I/O terminal strip -IN- 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 MTDI11 DI12 DI21 DI22 NC V- GND V+ 1Voltage, Current, Terminal Strip 2 3123456 4I- I+ NC U- NC U+ Current Hall E ect Sensors Load accuenergy.com accuenergy.com Digital Input AcuDC 240 optional I/O module is equipped with two dry contact digital inputs. The terminals are (17), (18), (19) and (20), as shown in figure 2-7. The Circuit is simplified as: When the switch is open, there is no current flowing into the diode side of the optical coupler, the triode is off, OUT is in low state. When the switch is closed, there is current flowing into the diode side, the triode is on, OUT is in high state. In this way, the ‘high’ and ‘low’ state of OUT corresponding to ‘closed’ and ‘’open’ state of the switch. The I/O module has built in power supply therefore the digital input does not require an external power supply. DI wire may choose AWG22-16 or 0.5-1.5 mm2. Analog Output AcuDC 240 I/O module offers two Analog Output modes, which are the current output 0-20mA/4-20mA(max 24mA) mode, and the voltage output 0-5V/1-5V(max 6V) mode, as shown in figure 2-15. NOTE: Each module can only has one type of output, please specify when ordering. Fig 2-15 Analog Output Wiring Chapter 2: Installation - Physical Setup V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 19 V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters Relay Output The AcuDC 240 series I/O option has two relay outputs, which are terminal (21), (22) and (23), (24) as shown in Fig 2-7. They can be used to remotely control circuit breakers. The relay outputs are form A (normally open) electromagnetic relay. The nodal capacity is 3A/250 Vac or 3A/30Vdc. If the coil current is high, a medium relay is recommended. 2.3.5 Communications Wiring AcuDC 240 series meter uses RS485 serial communication and the Modbus RTU protocol. The terminals of communication are A, B and S (14, 15 and 16). A is differential signal +, B is differential -, and S is connected to the shield of twisted pair cable. The overall length of the RS485 cable connecting all devices cannot exceed 1200m (4000ft). Utilizing a large number of RS485 devices and utilizing a high baud rate will make the communication range shorter. AcuDC 240 works as a Slave device. Master device can be PC, PLC, Data Acquisition Device, or RTU. Suggestions to improve communication quality: A high-quality Shielded Twisted Pair cable, AWG22(0.6mm2) or larger diameter cable, is recommended. Two cables should be in different colors. / Pay attention to ‘single point earthling’. Make sure that there is only one point of the shielding connected to ground in a single communication link. / Every terminal A(+) should be connected to terminal A(+), terminal B(-) to terminal B(- ), or it will influence the network, or even damage the communication interface. / The connection topology should avoid ‘T’ type which means there is a new branch and it does not begin from the beginning point. / Keep communication cables away from sources of electrical noise whenever possible. 201.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 accuenergy.com accuenergy.com Chapter 2: Installation - Physical Setup When using a long communication cable to connect several devices, an anti signal reflecting resistor (typical value 120Ω-300 Ω/0.25W) is normally added to the end of the cable beside the last meter if the communication quality is distorted. Use RS485 converter with optical isolated output and surge protection. T/R+ T/R- RDX+ RDX- GND VCC S 16 1514RS485 Converter Communication Terminal Block Meter Fig 2-17 Communications Wiring 2.4 Removing meter for servicing or maintenance Power Supply Inputs The wires carrying power into the AcuDC 240 meter must be de-energized regardless of whether the meter is powered by an independent source or by the measured load line. De-energize the wires by turning off the switchgear (disconnect switch, breaker or fuse) leading to the terminal block for pins 11 through 13. The terminal block can then be safely removed. NOTE: Removing the terminal block without turning off the switchgear switch may expose the operator to visible/bare wires that are still connected to dangerously high voltage levels. This may cause injury or death. Voltage Inputs 1. Preparing for Safe Removal De-energize the leads into the voltage pins by turning off the switchgear. NOTE: Removing the voltage leads without turning off the switchgear will expose the operator to dangerously high voltage levels. This may cause injury or death. 2. Disconnecting the Voltage Inputs Using a #2 flathead screw driver, turn each of the screws on pins 1 and 3 counter- clock wise. Stop turning when the wires can be easily removed from their housing. V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 21 V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 22AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters Current Inputs 1. Preparing for Safe Removal If the meter was wired directly in series to the current carrying lines without the use of a shunt/Hall effect sensor then the operator must de-energize the circuit before removing the circuit wires from the AcuDC meter. 2. Disconnecting the current inputs Using a #2 flat head screw driver, screw driver, turn the screws on pins 5 and pin 6 counter-clock wise. Stop turning when the wire can be easily removed from its housing. Cleaning the Meter ACCUENERGY recommends using a dry cloth to wipe the meter. accuenergy.com AcuDC 240 Series DC Power and Energy Meters Chapter 3: Installation - Configuration parameter set-up via display 3.1 Display panel and keys 3.2 General parameter setup 3.2.1 Key’s function in parameters setup 3.2.2 Configure AcuDC to work with shunt 3.2.3 Configure AcuDC for current hall effect sensor 3.2.4 Configure AcuDC for current and hall effect sensor 3.2.5 Clear energy Ah and DI counter 3.2.6 Set backlight brightness 3.2.7 Meter clock setting 3.2.8 Password setting 3.3 AcuDC Communication Setup 3.4 I/O Parameter Setup 3.4.1 AO parameter setting 3.4.2 RO parameter setting V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters CHAPTER 3: INSTALLATION - CONFIGURATION PARAMETER SET-UP VIA DISPLAY 3.1 Display Panel and Keys The front of the AcuDC 240 series meter consists of an LCD screen and two control keys. All the display segments are illustrated in Fig 3-1. Users should note that all the segments will not display in a single page under normal conditions. There are two keys on the front panel, marked as ‘F’ key and ‘V/A’ key, which are used to display different parameter data and parameter settings. 4 1 SET 1kVkAkWMW 22 3 3kWh Fig 3-1 All Display Segments Number Display Description 1 Display data of voltage, current, power and energy 2 kV, kA, kW, MW, kWh, Hz, kvarh, kvar, kVAh Mvar, kVA, MVA, Data Unit 3 241.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 No Icon: no communication One icon: query sent Two icons: query sent and response re- ceived 4 Setting mode: Indicates the meter is in Setting Mode accuenergy.com accuenergy.com Chapter 3: Installation - Configuration Parameter Set-up 3.2 General Parameter Setup Press ‘F’ and ‘V/A’ simultaneously whiles in the metering display mode to get to the system parameter setting mode. In parameter setting mode, pressing ‘F’ and ‘V/A’ simultaneously will exit the system parameter setting mode and return to the metering data mode. General parameter setup will define the general operating characteristics, such as current range setting, shunt current output range setting, rated voltage of voltage Hall Effect sensor, reset energy, Ah and DI counter, meter clock setting, and password reset etc., as shown in table 3-2. NOTE: Some of these settings will vary depending on the model number and firmware version of the meter. Label Paramters Default Options Description Note Communica- tion address 1 The address can 1 ~ 247 be any integer between 1~247 Communication parameter setup 25 Assign different ad- dresses to meters on same bus Baud Rate 19200 1200; 2400; 4800; 9600; 19200; 38400 All devices on the same communica- tion bus must use the same baud rate Parity Non1 Data Transmission Rate even; odd; non1; non2 All devices on the same communica- tion bus must use the same parity Shunt/Hall Effect Sensor Parameter Setup Current input of the shunt / hall effect sensor Only indirect current measurement has this screen Current output of the shunt 20 20 ~ 50000A Corresponds to the output range of the shunt Hall Effect Sensor Setup 100 50 ~ 100mV output range of the current Hall Effect Sensor 0: 4~20mA/0~±5V 1: 4~12-20mA/0~±4V rated voltage of the Voltage Hall Effect Sensor 0 0; 1 Only meter with indi- rect voltage measure- ment has this screen. output range of the voltage Hall Effect Sensor 0 ~ 3000V 0 0; 1 0: 0 ~ ±5V; 1: 0 ~ ±4V Energy, Ah and DI counter clear setup Energy delete(energy clear) No: energy not NO NO; cleared; Yes Yes: clear energy to 0 V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters Label Paramters Default Options Description Note Energy, Ah and DI count- er clear setup 261.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 No: means DI counter not cleared DI; Yes: clear DI counter to 0 Brightness Setup DI counter delete(DI counter clear) NO NO; Yes 1: minimum light level; 5: maximum light level Meter Clock Setup Backlight brightness 5 1 ~ 5 Date 1 ~ 31 Year/month/ date Time 0 ~ 59 24-hour clock Password Setup Password 0000 4 Digitals 3.2.1 Key’s Function in parameters setup Press ‘F’ and ‘V/A’ simultaneously whiles in the metering display mode to get to the system parameter setting mode. In parameter setting mode, pressing ‘F’ and ‘V/A’ simultaneously will exit the system parameter setting mode and return to the metering data mode. In the setting mode: / ‘V/A’ can be used to confirm changes or go to the next screen / ‘F’ can be used to change a setting or enter edit mode. A digit When in edit mode: / Press ‘F’ to increase the number of the flashing digit / Press ‘V/A’ to switch the flashing digit / Press ‘V/A’ on the last digit to confirm the change; the cursor should stop flashing. Once you are in the settings mode, you will be required to type in a password on the ‘PASS’ screen. / Enter your password or leave it as default ‘0000’ if it wasn’t changed. / Press ‘V/A’ to enter the system parameter settings mode. 3.2.2 Configure AcuDC to work with Shunt If the meter is wired to use a shunt to measure the current, you need to configure the full range current setting and shunt output range in the AcuDC so that it can read accurately from the shunt. accuenergy.com accuenergy.com Chapter 3: Installation - Configuration Parameter Set-up Press ‘F’ and ‘V/A’ simultaneously whiles in the metering display mode to get to the system parameter setting mode. In the parameter setting mode, Press ‘V/A’ until you get to the ‘I In’ screen. Enter the rated current input of the shunt in this screen. SET Press ‘F’ to change this setting. A digit will begin to flash and you will enter the edit mode. Press ‘F’ to increase the value of the flashing digit and press ‘V/A’ to switch the flashing digit. Press ‘V/A’ when on the last digit to confirm the change; the cursor will stop flashing at this point Fig 3-2 Full range current setting NOTE: The setting can be configured in the range of 20-50000A. NOTE: Only indirect current wiring has this screen.

SET Press ‘F’ and ‘V/A’ simultaneously whiles in the metering display mode to get to the system parameter setting mode. In the parameter setting mode, press ‘V/A’ until the screen ‘I o’ displays. This setting corresponds to the output range of the shunt. Press ‘F’ to change this setting. The first digit will begin to flash. Press Fig 3-3 Full range shunt setting ‘F’ to increase the value of the flashing digit. Use ‘V/A’ to switch the flashing digit. Press ‘V/A’ to confirm the change on the last flashing digit to go to the next screen. NOTE: The setting can be configured in the range of 50-100mV. 3.2.3 Configure AcuDC to work with Current Hall Effect Sensor If the meter is wired to measure current using a Hall Effect sensor, you will have to configure the full range current setting and Current Hall Effect sensor output range in the AcuDC, so that it can read accurately from the Hall Effect Sensor. To change the settings from the meter’s display, first get to the parameter setting mode. V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 27

V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters SET Refer to section 3.2.2 configure AcuDC to work with Hall Effect Sensor, first set the full range current setting as shown in Fig 3-2. Press ‘F’ and ‘V/A’ simultaneously whiles in the metering display mode to get to the system parameter setting mode. In the parameter setting mode, Press ‘V/A’ until you get to the ‘I In’ Fig 3-4 Current Hall Effect sensor setting screen as shown in Fig 3-2. Enter the rated current input of the shunt in this screen. After setting up the current range, press ‘V/A’ until the screen ‘I P’ displays. This setting corresponds to the output range of the Hall Effect Sensor. Press ‘F’ to change this setting and to select required output. Press ‘V/A’ to confirm this setting; the cursor will stop flashing at this point. NOTE: The default setting is ‘0’ for 4~20mA/0~±5V. The other mode is ‘1’ for 4-12~20mA/0~±4V. 3.2.4 Configure AcuDC to work with Current and Voltage Hall Effect Sensor If the meter is wired to measure current and voltage using a current hall effect sensor and voltage hall effect sensor respectively, You need to configure the settings in the AcuDC so that it can read accurately from both Hall Effect Sensors. Refer to section 3.2.2 configure AcuDC to work with shunt, first set up the current input range as shown in Fig 3-2 full range current setting. SET After setting up the current range, press ‘V/A’ to go to the next screen, as shown in Fig 3-5. This will be the ‘I P’ screen. This setting corresponds to the output range of the current Hall Effect Sensor. Press ‘F’ to change this setting and to select required output. Press ‘V/A’ to confirm this setting; the cursor will Fig 3-5 Current Hall stop flashing at this point. Effect sensor setting NOTE: The default setting is ‘0’ for 4~20mA/0~±5V. The other mode is ‘1’ for 4-12~20mA/0~±4V. 281.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 accuenergy.com accuenergy.com Chapter 3: Installation - Configuration Parameter Set-up SET After setting up the output range of the Current Hall Effect Sensor, as shown in Fig 3-5, press ‘V/A’ to go to the next screen. This will be the ‘U In’ screen, as shown in Fig 3-6. Enter the rated voltage of the Voltage Hall Effect Sensor. Press ‘F’ to change this setting. A digit will begin to flash and you will Fig3-6 Range Voltage setting enter edit mode. Press ‘F’ to increase the value of the flashing digit. Press ‘V/A’ to switch the flashing digit. Press ‘V/A’ when on the last digit to confirm the change; the cursor will stop flashing at this point. SET After setting up the rated voltage of the voltage Hall Effect Sensor, as shown in Fig 3-6, press ‘V/A’ to go to the next screen. This will be the ‘U P’ screen. This setting corresponds to the output range of the voltage Hall Effect Sensor. Press ‘F’ to change this setting and to select required output. Press ‘V/A’ Fig 3-7 Voltage Hall Effect Sensor setting to confirm this setting; the cursor will stop flashing at this point.

NOTE: The default setting is ‘0’: 0~±5V. The other mode is ‘1’: for 0~±4V. 3.2.5 Clear Energy, Ah and DI Counter

SET To clear the readings from the meter display mode, first get to the Setting mode. Press ‘F’ and ‘V/A’ simultaneously whiles in the metering display mode to get to the system parameter setting mode. In parameter setting mode, press ‘V/A’ until you get to the ‘EdEL’ screen, as shown in Fig 3-8. The screen Fig 3-8 Clear Energy displays ‘No’, which means energy not cleared. Press ‘F’ twice and it will show ‘YES’, which means ‘clear energy’, and the energy will be cleared to 0. After you choose ‘YES’ or ‘NO’, press ‘V/A’ to confirm and go to the next screen. SET Press ‘F’ and ‘V/A’ simultaneously whiles in the metering display mode to get to the system parameter setting mode. In parameter setting mode, press ‘V/A’ until you get to the ‘AdEL’ screen, as shown in Fig 3-9. The screen displays ‘No’, which means charge not cleared. Press ‘F’ twice and it will show Fig 3-9 Clear Ah ‘YES’, which means clear charge Ah, and the charge Ah will be cleared to 0. After you choose ‘YES’ or ‘NO’, press ‘V/A’ to confirm and go to the next screen. V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 29

V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters SET Press ‘F’ and ‘V/A’ simultaneously whiles in the metering display mode to get to the system parameter setting mode. In parameter setting mode, press ‘V/A’ until you get to the ‘ddEL’ screen, as shown in Fig 3-10. The screen displays ‘No’, which means DI counter not cleared’. Press ‘F’ twice and it will show Fig 3-10 DI Counter Reset ‘YES’, which means clear Di counter , and DI counter will be cleared to 0. After you choose ‘YES’ or ‘NO’, press ‘V/A’ to confirm and go to the next screen. 3.2.6 Set Backlight Brightness To set the backlight brightness from the meter display mode, first get to the Setting mode. SET Press ‘F’ and ‘V/A’ simultaneously whiles in the metering display mode to get to the system parameter setting mode. In the parameter setting mode, press ‘V/A’ until you get to the ‘bL’ screen, as shown in Fig 3-11. There are 5 levels backlight brightness. ‘1’ is minimum light level and ‘5’ is maximum light Fig 3-11 Backlight Brightness Setting level. Press ‘F’ to select and press ‘V/A’ to confirm and go to the next screen. 3.2.7 Meter Clock Setting SET Press ‘F’ and ‘V/A’ simultaneously whiles in the metering display mode to get to the system parameter setting mode. In parameter setting mode, press ‘V/A’ until you get to the ‘dATE’ screen, as shown in Fig 3-12. Press ‘F’ to change this setting. A digit will begin to flash and you can change the number. Press Fig 3-12 Date ‘F’ to increase the value of the flashing digit. Press ‘V/A’ to switch Adjustment the flashing digit. Press ‘V/A’ when on the last digit to confirm the change; the cursor will stop flashing at this point. Press ‘V/A’ to confirm and go to the time setting screen. SET Press ‘F’ and ‘V/A’ simultaneously whiles in the metering display mode to get to the system parameter setting mode. In the parameter setting mode, press ‘V/A’ until you get to the ‘TinE’ screen, as shown in Fig 3-13. The meter uses the 24-hour clock system. The time shown in Fig 3-15 is 14:19:52. Press ‘F’ to change Fig 3-13 Time this setting. A digit will begin to flash and you can change the Adjustment number. Press ‘F’ to increase the value of the flashing digit. Press ‘V/A’ to switch the flashing digit. Pressing ‘V/A’ when on the last digit will confirm the change; the cursor will stop flashing at this point. Press ‘V/A’ to confirm and go to the next screen. 301.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 accuenergy.com accuenergy.com Chapter 3: Installation - Configuration Parameter Set-up 3.2.8 Password Setting SET Press ‘F’ and ‘V/A’ simultaneously whiles in the metering display mode to get to the system parameter setting mode. In parameter setting mode, press ‘V/A’ until you get to the ‘PASS’ screen, as shown in Fig 3-14. Press ‘F’ to change this setting. A digit will begin to flash and you can change the number. Press Fig 3-14 Password ‘F’ to increase the value of the flashing digit. Press ‘V/A’ to switch Setting the flashing digit. Press ‘V/A’ when on the last digit to confirm the change; the cursor will stop flashing at this point. Press ‘V/A’ to confirm and go to the next screen.

By now the parameter settings are almost completed, except for the I/O module setting. Pressing ‘F’ and ‘V/A’ simultaneously will exit system parameter settings mode and return to the metering data mode. 3.3 AcuDC Communication Setup NOTE: Only meters with communication options have device address, baud rate and parity setting screens. To set communication parameters from the meter display mode, you must first press the ‘F’ and ‘V/A’ buttons simultaneously to get to the parameter setting mode. The communication parameter setup includes address setup, Baud rate setup, and parity setting, as shown in table 3-3.

SET Communication address can be any integer 1 ~ 247. Fig 3-15 shows the address number is 1. Press ‘F’ to change this setting. The first digit will begin to flash and you can change the edit mode. Press ‘F’ to increase the value of the flashing digit. Press ‘V/A’ to switch the flashing digit. Press ‘V/A’ when on the last Fig 3-15 digit to confirm the change; the cursor will stop flashing at this Communication point. Press ‘V/A’ to confirm and scroll to the next screen. Address Setup

NOTE: Modbus-RTU communication protocol requires that all meters on the same communication bus should have different addresses.

SET After address setup, the second screen is Baud rate setting page, or in parameter setting mode, press ‘V/A’ until see ‘bPS’ on the screen. Baud rate can be set as 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19200 and 38400. Fig 3-18 shows the baud rate is 19200 bps. Press ‘F’ to select the desired baud rate, and then press ‘V/A’ to Fig 3-16 Baud Rate confirm and go to the next screen. Setting V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 31

V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters SET After Baud rate setup, the next screen is the Parity setting page, or in parameter setting mode, press the ‘V/A’ button until you see ‘CHEC’ on the screen. Parity can be set as EVEN: even parity, 1 stop bit; ODD: odd parity, 1 stop bit; 1: no parity, 1 stop bit; 2: no parity, 2 stop bits. Fig 3-17 shows no parity, and 1 stop bit. Press ‘F’ to select Fig 3-17 Parity the desired baud rate, and then press ‘V/A’ to confirm and go to Setting the next screen. NOTE: All devices on the same communication bus should use the same baud rate and parity settings. 3.4 I/O Parameter Setup I/O module has two optional types: AO(Analog Output) type and RO(Relay Output) type. In the system parameter setting operation, hold the ’F” key for 3 seconds to enter the AO parameter setting mode, or hold the ‘V/A’ key for 3 seconds to enter the RO parameter setting mode. In the AO or RO setting mode, key functions are the same as in system parameter settings mode. ‘F’ key is used to increase value by 1 for the flashing digit. ‘V/A’ key is used to confirm the flashing digit and move to the cursor. At the last digit of the parameter, pressing ‘V/A’ key will confirm and go to the next screen. On ant screen, pressing ‘F’ and ‘V/A’ simultaneously will exit AO or RO parameter settings mode and return to the system parameter settings mode. Note: only the meters have AO or RO functions have the valid operations for the corresponding AO or RO parameter setting . 3.4.1 Meter Clock Setting For the module that supports the Analog Output function, it offers two AO channels. The AO parameter can be voltage, current and power. AO upper and lower limits include ‘sign’ and ‘percentage’ digit. The sign digit has three options”: represents (+), represents (-), represents (±). The range of the percentage digit is ‘0.00~1.00’, representing ‘0%~100%’ of the full range value. When the AO parameter is set as voltage, the upper and lower limit setting is ‘0%~100%’. When AO parameter is set as current or power, there are four modes:’ 0%~ +100%’; 0%~ -100%’;’-100%~ +100%’ and ‘0%~ ±100%’. NOTE: 1. There is no ‘sign’ digit when AO is set as voltage. ‘sign’ digit is invisible when percentage is 0. 2. For limit setting, 1.00 is 100%, 0 is 0%, and 0.25 is 25%. 321.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 accuenergy.com

accuenergy.com Chapter 3: Installation - Configuration Parameter Set-up SET In parameter setting mode, hold ‘F’ for 3 seconds until the screen ‘AotP’ displays (as shown in Fig 3-18), the meter is in AO parameter setting mode. It is the AO output setting. There are four AO output modes: 0: 0 ~ 5V; 1: 1 ~ 5V; 2: 0 ~ 20mA; 3: 4 ~ 20mA. Press ‘F’ key to select the type number (0, 1, 2 or 3), and then press Fig 3-18 AO Output ‘V/A’ key to confirm and scroll to the next screen setting page. Setting For example, Fig 3-18 shows the output type is 3, it means its AO output type is 4~20mA mode. NOTE: AO output type is determined by the equipped I/O module you ordered; incorrect parameter setting will result in invalid AO output value. SET In AO parameter setting mode, press ‘V/A’ until the screen ‘Ao 1P’ displays (as shown in Fig 3-19). It is AO1 parameter setting. There are three options: 0: voltage; 1: current; 2: power. Press ‘F’ key to select the parameter number (0, 1, or 2), and then press ‘V/A’ key to confirm and scroll to the next screen setting page. Fig 3-19 Fig 3-19 AO1 shows the AO1 is se t as current. Parameter Setting NOTE: AcuDC 241 and 242 do not have this screen. AO1 is set as what is being measured. SET In AO parameter setting mode, press ‘V/A’ until the screen ‘Ao 1L’ displays (as shown in Fig 3-20). It is AO1 lower limit setting, range is ‘0.00 ~ 1.00’. There is no ‘sign’ digit when the limit is 0. When the limit is not 0, the ‘sign’ digit will be visible, the sign can be adjusted by moving the cursor to the digit. Press ‘F’ and ‘V/A’ to Fig 3-20 AO1 Lower Limit Setting SET 33 edit the value, and then press ‘V/A’ key to confirm and scroll to the next screen setting page. Fig 3-20 shows the AO1 lower limit is set as 0. In AO parameter setting mode, press ‘V/A’ until the screen ‘Ao 1H’ displays (as shown in Fig 3-21). It is AO1 upper limit setting, range is ‘-100% ~ +100%’. The entire upper limit’s absolute value cannot be smaller or equal to the lower limit’. Under no circumstance can the upper limit be 0. Press ‘F’ to edit the value, and then press Fig 3-21 AO1 Up Limit Setting ‘V/A’ key to confirm and scroll to the next screen setting page. Fig 3-21 shows the AO1 up limit is set as +100%. V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018

V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters SET In AO parameter setting mode, press ‘V/A’ until the screen ‘Ao 2P’ displays (as shown in Fig 3-22). It is AO2 parameter setting. There are three options: 0: voltage; 1: current; 2: power. Press ‘F’ key to select the parameter number (0, 1, or 2), and then press ‘V/A’ key to confirm and scroll to the next screen setting page. Fig 3-22 Fig 3-22 AO2 shows the AO2 is set as voltage. Parameter Setting NOTE: 241 and 242 do not have this screen. AO1 is set as what is being measured. SET In AO parameter setting mode, press ‘V/A’ until the screen ‘Ao 2L’ displays (as shown in Fig 3-23). It is AO1 lower limit setting, range is ‘0.00 ~ 1.00’. There is no ‘sign’ digit when the limit is 0. When the limit is not 0, the ‘sign’ digit will be visible, the sign can be adjusted by moving the cursor to the digit. Press ‘F’ to edit the Fig 3-23 AO2 Lower Limit Setting value, and then press ‘V/A’ key to confirm and scroll to the next screen setting page. Fig 3-23 shows the AO1 lower limit is set as 0. SET In AO parameter setting mode, press ‘V/A’ until the screen ‘Ao 2H’ displays (as shown in Fig 3-22). It is the AO2 upper limit setting, range is ‘-100% ~ +100%’. The entire upper limit’s absolute value cannot be smaller or equal to the lower limit’. Under no circumstance can the upper limit be 0. Press ‘F’ to edit the value, Fig 3-24 AO2 Up Limit Setting and then press ‘V/A’ key to confirm and scroll to the next screen setting page. Fig 3-24 shows the AO1 up limit is set as +100%. 3.4.2 RO parameter setting In the system parameter setting operation page after successfully entering the password, hold the ‘V/A’ key for 3 seconds to enter the RO parameter setting page. The I/O module that contains the Relay Output function offers two RO channels. There are three modes for RO: Latch, Momentary and alarm. The mode setting depends on the object requirement i.e. A circuit breaker use Momentary. The momentary delay time is 300-5000 ms. Due to the relay action time error, this delay time has up to 3ms error. 341.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 accuenergy.com accuenergy.com SET Fig 3-25 RO1 Mode Setting SET Fig 3-26 RO1 Momentary Delay Time SET Fig 3-27 RO1 Alarm Parameter Setting SET Fig 3-28 RO1 Alarm Inequality Setting SET Fig 3-29 RO1 Alarm Threshold Range Setting Chapter 3: Installation - Configuration Parameter Set-up RO1 mode setting: In the parameter setting mode, hold ‘V/A’ for 3 seconds until the screen ‘Ro1F’ displays (as shown in Fig 3-23), the meter is in RO parameter setting mode. There are 3 RO1 modes: 0: Latch; 1: Momentary; 2: Alarm. Press ‘F’ key to select the mode number (0, 1 or 2), and then press ‘V/A’ key to confirm and scroll to the next screen setting page. For example, Fig 3-25 shows the RO1 mode is Latch. RO1 momentary delay time setting: In RO parameter setting mode, if RO1 mode is set as 1, Momentary, press ‘V/A’ key until the screen ‘Ro1d’ displays. The delay range in 300 ~ 5000 ms. Press ‘F’ to set the delay time. And then press ‘V/A’ key to confirm and scroll to the next screen setting page. Fig 3-26 shows the RO1 momentary delay time is 500ms, or 0.5s. RO1 alarm parameter setting: In RO parameter setting mode, if RO1 mode is set as 2, Alarm, press ‘V/A’ key until the screen ‘Ro1P’ displays. There are 4 options: 0: no alarm; 1: voltage; 2: current; 3: power. Press ‘F’ to select setting and press ‘V/A’ key to confirm and scroll to the next screen setting page. Fig 3-27 shows the RO1 alarm is ‘no alarm’. RO1 alarm inequality setting: In RO parameter setting mode, if RO1 mode is set as 2, Alarm, press ‘V/A’ key until the screen ‘Ro1S’ displays. There are 2 options: 0: smaller than; 1: larger than. Press ‘F’ to select and press ‘V/A’ key to confirm and scroll to the next screen setting page. RO1 alarm threshold range setting: In RO parameter setting mode, if RO1 mode is set as 2, Alarm, press ‘V/A’ key until the screen ‘Ro1u’ displays. The threshold setting range is the same as measurement range. Voltage: 0 ~ 3000V; Current: 0 ~ 50000A; Power: 0- 60000kW. Press ‘F’ to edit the value, and press ‘V/A’ key to confirm and scroll to the next screen setting page. V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 35

V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters SET RO1 alarm delay setting: In RO parameter setting mode, if RO1 mode is set as 2, Alarm, press ‘V/A’ key until the screen ‘Ro1t’ displays. The alarm delay time range is 0 ~ 255 s. In Fig 3-30, the alarm delay time is 15 seconds. If the alarm condition is met, after 15 second, the alarm will be triggered; or if the alarm Fig 3-30 RO1 Alarm Delay Setting condition is no longer met, after 15 seconds, the alarm will be restored. Press ‘F’ to edit the value, and press ‘V/A’ key to confirm and scroll to the next screen setting page. SET RO2 mode setting: In RO parameter setting mode, press ‘V/A’ until the screen ‘Ro2F’ displays (as shown in Fig 3-31). There are 3 RO2 modes: 0: Latch; 1: Momentary; 2: Alarm. Press ‘F’ key to select the mode number (0, 1 or 2), and then press ‘V/A’ key to confirm and scroll to the next screen setting page. For example, Fig 3-31 RO2 Mode Fig 3-29 shows the RO2 mode is Latch. Setting SET RO2 momentary: In RO parameter setting mode, if RO1 mode is set as 1, Momentary, press ‘V/A’ key until the screen ‘Ro2d’ displays. The delay range in 300 ~ 5000 ms. Press ‘F’ to set the delay time and then press ‘V/A’ key to confirm and scroll to the next screen setting page. Fig 3-30 shows the R21 momentary Fig 3-32 RO2 delay time is 500ms, or 0.5s. Momentary Delay Time SET RO2 alarm parameter setting : In RO parameter setting mode, if RO2 mode is set as 2, Alarm, press ‘V/A’ key until the screen ‘Ro2P’ displays. There are 4 options: 0: no alarm; 1: voltage; 2: current; 3: power. Press ‘F’ to select and press ‘V/A’ key to confirm and scroll to the next screen setting page. Fig 3-33 shows the Fig 3-33 RO2 Alarm RO2 alarm parameter is set as ‘voltage’. Parameter Setting SET RO2 alarm inequality setting: In RO parameter setting mode, if RO2 mode is set as 2, Alarm, press ‘V/A’ key until the screen ‘Ro2S’ displays. There are 2 options: 0: smaller than; 1: larger than. Press ‘F’ to select and press ‘V/A’ key to confirm and scroll to the next screen setting page. Fig 3-34 RO2 Alarm Inequality Setting 361.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 accuenergy.com

accuenergy.com Chapter 3: Installation - Configuration Parameter Set-up SET RO2 alarm threshold range setting: In RO parameter setting mode, if RO2 mode is set as 2, Alarm, press ‘V/A’ key until the screen ‘Ro2u’ displays. The threshold setting range is the same as measurement range. Voltage: 0 ~ 3000 V; Current: 0 ~ 50000A; Power: 0~ 60000kW. Press ‘F’ to edit the value and press ‘V/A’ key Fig 3-35 RO2 Alarm to confirm and scroll to the next screen setting page. Threshold Range Setting SET RO2 alarm delay setting: In RO parameter setting mode, if RO2 mode is set as 2, Alarm, press ‘V/A’ key until the screen ‘Ro2t’ displays. The alarm delay time range is 0 ~ 255, unit: second. In Fig 3-36, the alarm delay time is 15 second. If the alarm condition is met, after 15 second, alarm will be triggered; or if the alarm Fig 3-36 RO2 Alarm Delay Setting condition is no longer met, after 15 seconds, the alarm will be restored. Press ‘F’ to edit the value, and press ‘V/A’ key to confirm and scroll to the next screen setting page. Table 3-3 I/O Parameter Setting Label Paramters Options Description AO Output 0; 1; 2; 3 0: 0 ~ 5V; 1: 1 ~ 5V; 2: 0 ~ 20mA; 3: 4 ~ 20mA AO1 Parameter 0; 1; 2 0: voltage; 1: current; 2: power AO1 lower limit 0.00 ~ 1.00 0%-100% AO (Analogy Output) AO1 up limit -1.00 ~ +1.00 37 -100%~100% The entire upper limit’s absolute value should be larger than the lower limit. AO2 parameter 0; 1; 2 0: voltage; 1: current; 2: power AO2 lower limit 0.00 ~ 1.00 0%~100% AO2 up limit -1.00 ~ +1.00 -100%~100% The entire upper limit’s absolute value should be larger than the lower limit. RO 0: Latch; RO1 mode 0; 1; 2 1:Momentary; 2: Alarm RO1 momentary delay time 300 ~ 5000 Unit: ms RO1 alarm parameter 0; 1; 2; 3 0: no alarm; 1: voltage; 2: current; 3: power V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018

V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters Label Paramters Options Description RO 381.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 RO1 alarm inequality 0; 1 0: smaller than; 1: larger than RO1 alarm threshold range Voltage: 0 ~ 3000 V; Current: 0 ~ 50000A; Power: 0~ 60000kW. RO1 alarm delay 0 ~ 255 unit: second RO2 mode 0; 1; 2 0: Latch; 1:Momentary; 2: Alarm RO2 momentary delay time 300 ~ 5000 Unit: ms RO2 alarm parameter 0; 1; 2; 3 0: no alarm; 1: voltage; 2: current; 3: power RO2 alarm inequality 0; 1 0: smaller than; 1: larger than RO2 alarm threshold range Voltage: 0 ~ 1200V; Current: 0 ~ 50000A; Power: 0~ 6000kW RO2 alarm delay 0 ~ 255 unit: second accuenergy.com

AcuDC 240 Series DC Power and Energy Meters Chapter 4: Viewing Metering Parameters via Display 4.1 General Display on the AcuDC 4.2 View the Meter and Load Running Time 4.3 View the Serial Number from the Meter V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 40AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters CHAPTER 4: VIEWING METERING PARAMETERS – VIA DISPLAY You can view different information from the metering screen. For example, you can view voltage, current, power, energy, electric charge and clock information. In the metering screen, press ‘F’ to go to next screen, press ‘V/A’ to go to the different windows to view different information. 4.1 General Display on the AcuDC AcuDC 240 normally displays the metering screen, which shows real-time measured data, such as voltage, current, power, energy, meter clock, DI counter etc., as shown in table 4-1. The first screen on the metering screen shows voltage, current and power. Please note that AcuDC241 only shows voltage and AcuDC242 only shows current. Only AcuDC243 shows voltage, current and power at the same time. accuenergy.com accuenergy.com Chapter 4: Viewing Metering Parameters via Display V For the AcuDC 241, it only displays voltage, and there is a unit ‘V’ shown at the top right corner. For example, the screen in Fig. 4-1 shows it is AcuDC 241, and the voltage is 220.2V. Fig 4-1 Voltage Display (AcuDC 241) For the AcuDC 242, it only displays current, and there is a unit ‘A’ k shown at the top right corner. For example, the screen in Fig. 4-2 Shows it is AcuDC 242, and the current is 49.99A. Fig 4-2 Current Display (AcuDC 242) For the AcuDC 243, the screen displays current, voltage and 1 V AkW power, and the units are ‘V, A and kW’ shown at the top right 2corner. The first line displays voltage, the second line displays current and the third line displays power. For example, the voltage 3shown in the left figure is 220.2V; the current shown in the left figure is 49.99A, the power shown in the left figure is 11.00KW. Fig 4-3Multifunction Communication status is active. Display (AcuDC 243) NOTE: Communication status is displayed on every screen in AcuDC 243. Press ‘F’ to view the Energy data. You can press ‘V/A’ on the energy screen to switch between different types of energy. E1 = Import Energy (consumed energy), E2 = Export Energy (generated energy) , E3 = Total Energy (absolute sum of import energy and export energy), and E4 = Net Energy (algebraic sum of import energy and export energy). kWh kWh kWh kWh (a) Import Energy (b) Export Energy (c) Total Energy (d) Net Energy Fig 4-4 Energy Display V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 41 V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters Press ‘F’ to go to the third screen. The third screen shows Electric charge. You can press ‘V/A’ on the electric charge screen to switch between different types of charges. Ah1 = Import Charge, Ah2 = Export Charge, Ah3 = Total Charge (absolute sum of Import Charge Ah and Export Charge Ah), and Ah4 = Net Charge (algebraic sum of Import Charge Ah and Export Charge Ah).(a) Import Charge (b) Export Charge Fig 4-5 Charge Display Press ‘F’ to go to the fourth screen. The fourth screen shows clock information. For example, screen displayed in Fig 4-6a shows the date is 2014:04:09; screen displayed in Fig 4-6b shows the time is 14:19:52. You can press ‘V/A’ on the clock information screen to switch between the date and time. (a) Date Display Fig 4-6 Clock Information Display If the meter is equipped with DI counting function (AcuDC 240 with I/O module), press ‘F’ key to go to the DI count display screen. You can press ‘V/A’ on the DI counting screen to switch between the DI1 and DI2 counting. (a) DI1 Count Display Fig 4-7 DI Count Display 421.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 (c) Total Charge (b) Time Display (b) DI2 Count Display (d) Net Charge SET accuenergy.com accuenergy.com Chapter 4: Viewing Metering Parameters via Display Screen No. Widnow No. Description Operation Voltage Current Power 1 1 241 only displays voltage; 242 only displays current; 243 displays all First screen in metering data display mode Energy E1 2 1 E1: import energy Press ‘F’ at last screen E2 2 E2: export energy Press ‘V/A’ E3 3 E3: Total energy Press ‘V/A’ E4 4 E4: net energy Press ‘V/A’ Charge Ah1 3 1 Ah1: import charge Press ‘F’ at last screen Ah2 2 Ah2: export charge Press ‘V/A’ Ah3 3 Ah3: Total charge Press ‘V/A’ Ah4 4 Ah4: net charge Press ‘V/A’ Meter Clock Date 4 1 Year/month/day Press ‘F’ at last screen Time 2 Hour/min/sec 24-hour clock Press ‘V/A’ DI count number DI1 Count 5 1 Press ‘F’ at last screen DI2 Count 2 Press ‘V/A’ 4.2 View the Meter and Load Running Time If you press down the ‘F’ button for about 3 seconds while in the metering data mode, you will get to the meter information display mode. You can press ‘F’ to exit the meter information display mode. / In this meter information display mode, you can press ‘V/A’ to switch between the meter running hours and load running hours. ‘r’ means meter running hours while ‘L’ means load running hours. (a) Meter Running (b) Load Running Time Time Fig 4-8 Running Time Display V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 43 V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 44AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters 4.3 View the serial number from the meter If you press down the ‘V/A’ button for about 3 seconds while in the metering data mode, you will get to the serial number display mode. You can press ‘V/A’ to exit the serial number display mode. Fig 4-9 Serial Number NOTE: This screen displays the last 8 digits of the meter’s serial number. accuenergy.com AcuDC 240 Series DC Power and Energy Meters Chapter 5: Viewing Real-Time Readings via Acuview Software 5.1 Connection Setup 5.1.1 Wiring 5.1.2 Acuview software setup 5.2 Configuration Parameters Setup 5.2.1 General meter parameter setting 5.2.2 Configure the Data Log using the meter’s memory 5.2.3 Configure the Data Log to log to computer memory 5.3 Viewing Metering Parameters 5.3.1 Real-time Metering 5.3.2 Reading Data Log on meter’s onboar memory 5.3.3 Reading Data Log on a computer’s memory V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters CHAPTER 5: Viewing Real-time Readings Via AcuView Software This chapter will mainly discuss how to use the meter via the communication port using software. It is highly recommended that previous chapters be read before moving onto Chapter 5, a familiarity with Modbus would also be helpful. 5.1 Connection Setup 5.1.1 Wiring Refer to section 2.3.6(Communications Wiring) 5.1.2 Acuview Software Setup 1. New Connection: A connection is required before communicating with the meter. To add a new connection, do one of the following: 1) Click Setting > Connection Manager or2) Click the icon / New: add a new connection / Delete: Delete the select connection / Edit: Edit the selected connection settings. / Close: Close the window / Status: ‘Available’ means Com Port is active, and ‘not Available’ means Com Port is inactive. If the status is blank, it means that Com Port has not been established. 461.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 The Connection Manager is shown as in Fig 5-1. Fig 5-1 Connection Manager accuenergy.com accuenergy.com 2. Connection Settings: Set the connection parameters. The Connection Settings box is shown on the screen as in Fig. 5-2 Click ‘OK’ after settings finish. 1) Click Operation > Add Device or2) Click the icon Fig 5-2 Acuview Software Connection Settings / Name: Give connection a name / Type: Select the serial port that the RS485 connection is using / Com Port: Select the serial port that the RS485 connection is using / Baud Rate: Should match the baud rate in the meter settings. / Parity: Should match the parity in the meter settings. / Scan Interval: Used to adjust the time interval between two message(200ms or 500ms is recommended) NOTE: Baud Rate and Parity must match between meter and software. NOTE: How to find ‘Com Port’ in your computer Right click on ‘Computer’, then click ‘Properties’ menu. In the pop up window click on ‘Device Manager’ from the left navigation panel to find the port number. In the device Manager window, double click on ‘Port (COM&LPT)’ from the dropdown list. Find the ‘USB Serial Port (COMx)’ the number in brackets is the port number, i.e. COM4. Please select the corresponding Com Port here. Chapter 5: Viewing Real-Time Readings via Acuview Software

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V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters 3. Add Device: After performing step 1 and 2 above, you need to add a device to communicate with. To add a new device, do one of the following: 1) Click Operation >Add Device or2) Click the icon The Add Device box is shown as Fig 5-3. Click ‘OK’ after settings finish. Fig 5-3 Add Device / Device Type: The model of the device you are going to communicate with / Connection: Select a connection for the communication / Device Address: Should match the address in the meter settings / Description: Device description such as where the device is used, for example, ‘Building 1’. 481.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 accuenergy.com

accuenergy.com 4. Connection: You can read all the measurement data after you successfully complete Step 3. To connect, do one of the following: 1) Click Operation > Connect Or 2) Click the icon Or 3) Press F9 on keyboard If the connection is successful, the screen will show the measured data on the screen, and you will see ‘Com Failure = 0, Log Failure = 0’ at the bottom right corner on the screen. If the connection is not successful, no measured data will appear on the screen, and you will see ‘Com Failure = 1, Log Failure = 0’ at the bottom right corner on the screen in red. NOTE: If connection is not successful, please make sure: The physical connection of the device is correct; the communication parameters, such as Baud Rate, Parity, device type and device address are not properly set. 5.2 Configuration Parameters Setup 5.2.1 General Meter Parameter Setting / From the left navigation panel click on the ‘Settings’ tab and then on ‘General’. You can set up the system parameters and I/O settings from this section, as shown in Fig 5-4. / Click on ‘Update Device’ after making changes, so that the changes can be saved on the meter. Parameters can be setup with following rules: Security and Communication: You can set the meter’s password, device address, Baud Rate and parity from this section and the meter will make the corresponding changes. Voltage and Current: If you are measuring your voltage using a voltage Hall Effect sensor and/or your current using either a Hall Effect sensor or a shunt, you will have to set the Voltage and/or Current sections. Chapter 5: Viewing Real-Time Readings via Acuview Software

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V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 50AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters RO1 Output Mode/RO2 Output Mode: This is available with the ‘X3’ module Choose between the three modes: / Latch: To manually turn on and off the relay / Momentary: To turn on the relay for a set number of seconds before it goes back off. / If momentary mode is selected, set the delay time ‘On Time’; the range is 300- 5000ms. The delay time has an error of up to 3ms (due to the relay action time error) / Alarm: To trigger the relay output through an alarm event. RO Alarm Limit: Set the Alarm Channel, Setting, Setpoint and Delay (in sec) for both RO1 and RO2; this is needed if RO1/RO2 Output mode is set as ‘Alarm’ Fig 5-4 General settings accuenergy.com

accuenergy.com Chapter 5: Viewing Real-Time Readings via Acuview Software Raw Channel of AO1/Raw Channel of AO2: The settings are available with the X1 and X2 modules Select the parameter (Voltage, Current, Power) you will like to send as an Analog Output. Set the High and Low Limit based on the parameter you have selected. Note: / When AO parameter is set as voltage, the upper and lower limit setting range is between 0% - 100%. E.g. it can be set as: 0% - 100%, 0% - 50% etc. / When AO parameter is set as current or power, there are four different modes for the upper and lower limit setting range. It can be between: 0% - +100%, 0% - -100%, -100% - +100%, and 0% - ±100%. E.g. it can be set as: 0% - +50%, 0% - -50% etc. / Upper Limit cannot be 0% Other: / You can adjust the backlight brightness under the Backlight Adjustment section. The range is from 1 to 5. DI 1 Type/ DI 2 Type: Select DI 1 or DI 2 as: / State: DI will act as a switch status monitor / Counter: DI will act as a pulse counter. NOTE: You can ‘import’ a saved device profile to quickly setup the meter parameters: Click Tools->Import Device Settings, select the desired file and click ‘Open’, and after importing successfully, click ‘Update Device’, or click Tools->Import and Update Device, select the desired file. You also can save the current settings to a file via the export device profile function in ‘Tools’. 5.2.2 Configure the Data Log using the meter’s onboard memory You can set up the meter to log data on the onboard memory. / From the left navigation panel click on the settings tab then click ‘Data Log’ to access the data log setting page (as shown in Fig 5-5).

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V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters Fig 5-5 Data Log readings Parameter Selection: Select the parameters you would like to log (from the left box), click ‘Add’ to add them to the box on the right. Enable Data Log: Make sure you check the box ‘Enabled’ to enable data log. Time Setting: There are three different Logging Modes. / Continuous: This will start logging data immediately, after the ‘Update Device’ button is clicked. / In this mode, you will have to set the Logging Interval. / Scheduling: This will start logging data from a set Start Time. / In this mode, you will have to set the Logging Interval and Start Time. NOTE: When the memory is full, a memory sector is deleted and the data logging will continue for the above two modes. / Interval: This will log data from a start time to an end time. / In this mode, you will have to set the Logging Interval, as well as the Start Time and End Time. NOTE: When the memory is full, the data logging will stop. Make sure to click on ‘Update Device’ after making changes, so that the changes can be saved on the meter. NOTE: When you click on ‘Update Device’, the meter’s data log memory will be erased. 521.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 accuenergy.com

accuenergy.com 5.2.3 Configure the data log to log the readings on the computer’s memory This applies to AcuDC 240 series meters with communication option; the meters do not need to have onboard memory since the data will be logged directly on the computer’s memory. You can set up the meter to log data directly on the computer memory. You must always be connected to the software for this data log method to work. You can access this data log setting by clicking on the ‘Settings’ option located on the menu toolbar, and then clicking on ‘Data Log Settings’ or click the icon Fig 5-6 Accessing Data Log The Data Log Setting window will open. This is shown in Fig 5-6. In data log setting, as shown in Fig 5-7, make sure you check the ‘Enabled’ box in the window. Under the ‘Logging Items of Selection’ Section: click on the required groups of parameters you will like to log. Under the ‘Logging Options’ Section: Chapter 5: Viewing Real-Time Readings via Acuview Software

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V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters In data log setting, as shown in Fig 5-7, make sure you check the ‘Enabled’ box in the window. Under the ‘Logging Items of Selection’ Section: click on the required groups of parameters you will like to log. Under the ‘Logging Options’ Section: / Choose the ‘Logging Data Interval’. / Choose between the options ‘Log data until file is full’ or ‘Specify Log file duration’ / If ‘Specify Log file duration’ is selected: Choose how often you want a new file created. / Choose the ‘Log file format’ you want the file(s) saved as. Enter the preferred name for the file in ‘Log file name’. Choose the ‘Log file folder location’ where the file(s) will be saved. Once everything is set, click ‘OK’. Finally, make sure you click the icon 541.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 on the top of the screen to start data logging on the computer. You can click the icon Fig 5-7 Data Log settings on the top of the screen to stop data logging. accuenergy.com

accuenergy.com WARNING: If ‘Excel’ is chosen as the ‘Log file format’: After you click on the icon to start data logging, a warning window will pop up. Take note of the warning in order to prevent your files from being corrupt.Fig 5-8 Warning To get help or more information on the Acuview software, please click ‘help’ in the main menu bar, of click the icon . Chapter 5: Viewing Real-Time Readings via Acuview Software V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 55

V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 56AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters 5.3 Viewing Metering Parameters 5.3.1 Real-Time Metering From the left navigation panel click on the ‘Readings’ tab and then select ‘Real-Time Metering’ to view the meter’s real time data. You can read voltage, current, energy, charge etc, as shown in Fig 5-9. You can modify the value of energy and charge by clicking the underlined figures. And you can also reset the energy, charge, DI counter and Max and Min by clicking ‘Reset’, the values will reset to 0. On this reading window you can also control relay 1 and relay 2. Fig 5-9 Reading Real Time Meter (change another picture, with load, this reading without load, so voltage is 0) accuenergy.com

accuenergy.com 5.3.2 Reading Data Log on Meter’s Onboard Memory From the left navigation panel click on the ‘Readings’ tab and then select ‘Data Log’ to retrieve the meter’s logged readings. The parameter settings for data log in meter’s onboard memory refer to section 5.2.2 (Configure the Data Log using the meter’s onboard memory). On this window you can view the data log, while the maximum record number is 85995. Chapter 5: Viewing Real-Time Readings via Acuview Software Fig 5-12 Reading Data Log on Meter’s Onboard Memory

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V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 58AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters 5.3.3 Reading Data Log on the computer’s memory Find the data log files from the specified folder location where the file was saved. The parameter settings for data log on the computer’s memory refer to section 5.2.3. If you chose the default path, there is a folder named MonData in the Acuview installation directory where all the data log files are stored. By default, each file name consists of device description, device type, port(Serial mode), device address and data logging starting time whose format is YYYYMMDD(Year, Month, Day). After you open a data log file, you will see the following items: ‘Time U (V) I (A) P (kW)’. The file content is the same whether data is saved as .txt or .csv or .Excel. accuenergy.com

AcuDC 240 Series DC Power and Energy Meters Appendix A. Troubleshooting B. Modbus Register Map B.1 MODBUS-RTU Protocol B.2 Communication Format B.3 AcuDC 240 Communication Address Table C. Ordering Information D. Glossary of Definitions V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 60AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters APPENDIX This chapter will mainly discuss how to use the meter via the communication port using software. It is highly recommended that previous chapters be read before moving onto Chapter 5, a familiarity with Modbus would also be helpful. A. Troubleshooting My AcuDC 243 is displaying the correct current but the power (kW) is negative. Check to see if the AcuDC is installed on the negative terminal of the load. Why is my AcuDC 243 measuring the wrong current with the Current Hall Effect Sensor? A connection is required before communicating with the meter. To add a new connection, do one of the following: / The Hall Effect Sensor should be installed on the negative side of the load. / Ensure that the Hall Effect sensor is being powered. If the sensor was purchased from Accuenergy then the sensor will need a ±15V dc power supply. / Ensure that the wiring of the sensor is to the AcuDC is correct. / Terminal 3 of the sensor should be connected to ‘I+’ of the AcuDC 243. / Terminal 4 of the sensor should be connected to ‘I-‘of the AcuDC 243. •/ Terminal 4 of the sensor must also be connected to Ground. •/ Check that the settings in the meter are configured to read accurately from that sensor. •/ Press ‘F’ and ‘V/A’ simultaneously whiles on the meter data mode to get to the settings mode. •/ A password screen will display. Leave the password as default ‘0000’ and press ‘V/A’ to enter the setting mode; the communication address ‘AddR’ screen will display next. •/ Press ‘V/A’ until you get to the ‘I In’ screen. Enter the rated current input of the Hall Effect Sensor in this screen. •/ Press ‘F’ to change this setting. A digit will begin to flash and you will enter the edit mode. •/ Press ‘F’ to increase the value of the flashing digit •/ Press ‘V/A’ to switch the flashing digit •/ Press ‘V/A’ when on the last digit to confirm the change; the cursor will stop flashing at this point accuenergy.com accuenergy.com Appendix SET •/ Press ‘V/A’ to go to the next screen. This will be the ‘I P’ screen. This setting corresponds to the output range of the Hall Effect Sensor. •/ Press ‘F’ to change this setting and to select required output. NOTE: The default setting is ‘0’ for 4-20mA/0-±5V. The other mode is ‘1’ for 4-12-20mA/0-±4V. •/ Press ‘V/A’ to confirm this setting; the cursor will stop flashing at this point SET Why is my AcuDC 243 measuring the wrong current with the shunt I am using? / The shunt should be installed on the negative side of the load. / Ensure that the AcuDC 243 is wired correctly to the shunt so that it can be read accurately. / The positive output from the shunt should be connected to the AcuDC 243 ‘I+’ terminal. / The negative output from the shunt should be connected to the ‘AcuDC 243 ‘I-‘terminal. / If the voltage is also being measured ensure that the positive DC source is connected to the AcuDC 243 ‘V+’ terminal whiles the AcuDC 243 ‘V-‘ terminal should be connected to the ‘I-‘ terminal on the AcuDC 243. / Ensure that the shunt being used outputs a signal in the range of 50-100mV to work with the meters current input. / Check that the settings in the meter are configured to read accurately from the shunt. / Press ‘F’ and ‘V/A’ simultaneously whiles on the meter data mode to get to the settings mode. V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 61 V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters / A password screen will display. Leave the password as default ‘0000’ and press ‘V/A’ to enter the setting mode; the communication address ‘AddR’ screen will display next. / Press ‘V/A’ until you get to the ‘I In’ screen. Enter the rated current input of the shunt in this screen. / Press ‘F’ to change this setting. A digit will begin to flash and you will enter the edit mode. / Press ‘F’ to increase the value of the flashing digit / Press ‘V/A’ to switch the flashing digit / Press ‘V/A’ when on the last digit to confirm the change; the cursor will stop flashing at this point. SET / Press ‘V/A’ to go to the next screen. This will be the ‘I o’ screen. This setting corresponds to the output range of the shunt. / Press ‘F’ to change this setting. The first digit will begin to flash and you will enter the edit mode. / Press ‘F’ to increase the value of the flashing digit / Press ‘V/A’ to switch the flashing digit / Press ‘V/A’ when on the last digit to confirm the change; the cursor will stop flashing at this point SET Why won’t my meter connect to the AcuView software? / The physical connection of the device is incorrect, please refer to section 2.3.6; / The communication parameters, such as Baud Rate, Parity, device type, device address are not properly selected the same as the meter. / The “Com Port” in the software is not selected as the same as the computer. Please refer to section 5.1.2. 621.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 accuenergy.com accuenergy.com Appendix B. Modbus Register Map This chapter will discuss how to operate the meter via the communication port using software. Before starting this chapter, you should be familiar with Modbus and read other chapters of this manual to make sure that you have a good understanding of the functions and applications of this product. This chapter includes: Modbus protocol, communication format and communication address table. B.1 MODBUS-RTU Protocol Modbus RTU protocol is used for AcuDC 240’s communication. Data format and error check methods are defined in Modbus protocol. The half duplex query and respond mode is adopted in Modbus protocol. Modbus allows master device (PC, PLC etc.) to communicate with slave devices, it will not allow data exchange between slave devices. Therefore, terminal devices will not engage the communication link at initialization, only response to the master’s request. B.1.1 Transmission Mode The mode of transmission defines the data structure within a frame and the rules used to transmit data. / Coding System 8 bit / Start Bit 1 bit / Data Bits 8bits / Parity Even/ Odd/ None2/ None1 / Stop Bit 1/2bit / Error Checking CRC V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 63 V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters B.1.2 Modbus Protocol 1. Frame When data frame reaches the terminal unit, the unit removes the data frame’s header, reads the data, if there is no error, it’ll implement the data’s task. Afterwards, the unit puts its own data with the acquired header, and sends back the frame to the sender. The response data frame contains: Address, Data and CRC Check. Any error will cause a failure to respond. Table B-1 Data Frame Format Address Function Data Check 8-Bits 8-Bits N X 8-Bits 16-Bits 2. Address Field The address field is at the start of the frame. It is composed of 1 byte (8 bits), its decimal value range is 0~255. A master addresses a slave by placing the slave address in the address field of the message. When the slave sends its response, it places its own address in this address field of the response to let the master know which slave is responding. 3. Function Field When a message is sent from a master to a slave device, the function code field tells the slave what kind of action to perform. Table B-2 Function Code Code Meaning Action 01 Read RO Status Obtain Relay Output Current Status (ON/OFF) 02 Read DI status Obtain Digital Input Current Status(ON/OFF) 03 Read holding register Obtain Current Binary Value of One or Multiple Registers 05 Control RO Control Relay Output(ON/OFF)) 16 Preset multiple registers Place Specific Binary Value into Multiple Registers 641.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 accuenergy.com accuenergy.com Appendix 4. Data Field Data field contains the data that terminals need to complete the request and the data that terminals respond to the request. This Data may be a numerical value, address or setting. For example, Function Code tells the terminal to read one register, Data Field needs to specify from which register and how many registers to read. 5. Error Check Field The field allows the error check by master and slave devices. Due to electrical noise and other interfaces, a group of data may be changed while transmitting from one location to the other. Error Check ensures master or slave devices do not respond to the distorted data during the transmission, which enhance the system security and efficiency. Error Check uses 16-bit Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC 16). 6. CRC Check Every message includes an error checking field which is based on the Cyclical Redundancy Check(CRC) method. The CRC field checks the contents of the entire message. It is applied regardless of any parity check method used for the individual characters of the message. The CRC field is two bytes long, containing a 16-bit binary value. The CRC value is calculated by the transmitting device, and is appended to the message. The receiving device recalculates the CRC value during reception of the message, and compares the calculated value to the actual value it received in the CRC field. An error will be reported if the two values are not equal. CRC calculation is first started by preloading the whole 16-bit register to 1’s. The process begins by applying successive 8-bit bytes of the message to the current contents of the register. Only the eight bits of data in each character are used for generating the CRC. Start and stop bits, and the parity bit, do not apply to the CRC. When generating the CRC, each 8-bit character is exclusive ORed with the register contents. The result is shifted towards the least significant bit (LSB), with a zero filled into the most significant bit (MSB) position. The LSB is extracted and examined, if the LSB equals to 1, the register is exclusive ORed with a preset, fixed value; if the LSB equals to 0, no action will be taken. This process is repeated until eight shifts have been performed. After the last (eighth) shift, the next 8-bit byte is exclusive ORed with the register’s current value, and the process repeats for eight more shifts as described above. The final contents of the register, after all the bytes of the message have been applied, the final contents of the register, which should exchange the high-byte and low-byte, is the CRC value. When the CRC is appended to the message, the low-order byte is appended first, followed by the high-order byte. V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 65 V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters B.2 Communication Format This section will illustrate the format indicated in Table B-3. Table B-3 Protocol Illustration (Hex value and Decimal value) Addr Fun Data Start Reg Hi Addr: Slave device address Data start reg hi: Start register address, high byte Data start reg lo: Start register address, low byte Data# of reg hi: Number of registers, high byte Data# of reg lo: Number of registers, low byte CRC 16 hi: CRC high byte CRC 16 lo: CRC low byte B.2.1 Read Relay Output Status (Function Code 01) Query The master device sends query frame to the slave device. Function Code 01 allows users to acquire the relay output status (1=ON, 0=OFF) of the slave device with the specified address. Along with slave device address and function code, query frame must contain the relay register starting address and the number of registers to be read. AcuDC 240 relay output address starts from 0000H (Relay 1=0000H, Relay 2=0001H). Table B.4 depicts reading Relay 1 and 2 statuses from slave address 17. Table B-4 Query Frame of Reading Relay Output Status 661.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 Data Start Reg Lo Data # of Regs Hi Data # of Regs Lo CRC16 Hi CRC 16 Lo Hex 06H 03H 00H 00H 00H 21H 84H 65H Dec 6 3 0 0 0 33 132 101 Addr Fun Data Start Reg Hi Data Start Reg Lo Data # of Regs Hi Data # of Regs Lo CRC16 Hi CRC 16 Lo Hex 11H 01H 00H 00H 00H 02H BFH 5BH Dec 17 1 0 0 0 2 191 91 accuenergy.com accuenergy.com Appendix Response The slave device answers the master device’s query. The response frame contains slave device address, function code, data quantity and CRC check. Each relay utilizes one bit (1=ON, 0=OFF). Table B-5 depicts the response frame. Table B-5 Response Frame of Reading Relay Output Status Addr Fun Byte Count Data CRC16 Hi CRC 16 Lo Hex 11H 01H 01H 02H D4H 89H Dec 17 1 1 2 212 137 Data Bytes 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 (Relay 1=OFF, Relay 2=ON) B.2.2 Read DI Status (Function Code 02) Query This function allows the user to obtain DI status ON/OFF (1=ON, 0=OFF). On top of slave device address and function code, query frame must contain the digital input register, starting address and the number of registers to be read. AcuDC 240 DI address starts from 0000H (DI1-0000H, DI2-0001H). Table B.6 depicts reading DI1 to DI2 status of the slave device with the address of 17. Table B-6 Query Frame of Reading DI Status Addr Fun Data Start Reg Hi Data Start Reg Lo Data # of Regs Hi Data # of Regs Lo CRC16 Hi CRC 16 Lo Hex 11H 02H 00H 00H 00H 02H FBH 5BH Dec 17 2 0 0 0 2 251 91 V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 67 V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters Response The slave device answers the master device’s query. The response frame contains slave device address, function code, data quantity and CRC check. Each DI utilizes one bit (1=ON, 0=OFF). Table B-7 depicts the response frame. Table B-7 Response Frame of Reading DI Status Addr Fun Byte Count Data CRC16 Hi CRC 16 Lo Hex 11H 02H 01H 01H 64H 88H Dec 17 2 1 1 251 136 B.2.3 Read Data (Function Code 03) Query This function allows the master to obtain the measurement results from the meter. Table B.6 depicts reading slave device (address 1) voltage. The AcuDC 240 voltage address is 0200H-0201H. Table B-8 Query Frame of Reading Voltage Addr Fun Data Start Reg Hi Response Response frame contains slave device address, function code, data quantity and CRC check. Table B-9 depicts the response of V=402851D8H (2.6299953V) Table B-9 Response Frame of Reading Voltage 681.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 Data Start Reg Lo Data # of Regs Hi Data # of Regs Lo CRC16 Hi CRC 16 Lo Hex 01H 03H 02H 00H 00H 02H C5H B3H Dec 1 3 2 0 0 2 197 179 Addr Fun Byte Count Data1 Hi Data1 Lo Data2 Hi Data2 Lo CRC16 Hi CRC 16 Lo Hex 01H 03H 04H 40H 28H 51H D8H 52H 31H Dec 1 3 4 64 40 81 216 82 49 accuenergy.com accuenergy.com Appendix B.2.4 Control Relay Output (Function Code 05) Query This query frame forces the rely status to ON or OFF. The AcuDC 240 relay output address starts from 0000H(Relay 1= 0000H, Relay 2= 0001H). Data FF00H changes the relay status to ON, data 0000H changes the relay status to OFF. The relay will not be influenced by any other data input. The following is to query slave device 1 to set relay status as ON. Table B-10 Query Frame of Control Relay Status Addr Fun DO Addr Hi DO Addr Lo Value Hi Value Lo CRC16 Hi CRC 16 Lo Hex 01H 05H 00H 00H FFH 00H 8CH 3AH Dec 1 5 0 0 255 0 140 58 Response The correct response to this request is to send back the received data after the relay status is changed. Table B-11 Response Frame of Control Relay Status Addr Fun DO Addr Hi DO Addr Lo Value Hi Value Lo CRC16 Hi CRC 16 Lo Hex 01H 05H 00H 00H FFH 00H 8CH 3AH Dec 1 5 0 0 255 0 140 58 V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 69 V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters B.2.5 Read Data (Function Code 03) Query Function Code 16 (10 H Hex) allows the user to modify the contents of multiple registers. AcuDC 240 system parameters can be written by this function code. The following example depicts how to preset slave device 1’s AO1 parameter (current), lower limit sign (+), lower limit value (0%), upper limit sign(+), upper limit value (100%) Table B-12 Query Frame of Preset Multiple Registers Addr Fun Data Start Reg Hi Response The correct response is to send back the address, function code; data starting address, data number, CRC check after the value is changed. Table B-13 Preset Multiple Registers Response 701.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 Data Start Reg Lo Data # of Regs Hi Data # of Regs Lo Byte Count Value 1 Hi Value 1 Lo Hex 01H 10H 01H 09H 00H 05H 0AH 00H 01H Dec 1 1 9 0 5 10 0 1 Value 2 Hi Value 2 Lo Value 3 Hi Value 3 Lo Value 4 Hi Value 4 Lo Value 5 Hi Value 5 Lo CRC 16 Hi CRC 16 Lo 00H 00H 00H 00H 00H 00 00H 64H C5H 8AH 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 100 197 138 Addr Fun Data Start Reg Hi Data Start Reg Lo Data # of Regs Hi Data # of Regs Lo CRC 16 Hi CRC 16 Lo Hex 01H 10H 01H 09H 00H 05H D1H F4H Dec 1 16 1 9 0 5 209 244 accuenergy.com accuenergy.com Appendix B.3 AcuDC240 Communication Address Table Basic Measurement Parameter Address Use Function Code 03 to read Table 5-14 Real-Time Measurement Address Table Address (Hex) Address (dec) Parameter Data Type Property 0200H- 0201H 512- 513 Voltage Float R 0202H- 0203H 514- 515 Current Float R 0204H- 0205H 516- 517 Power Float R 0206H- 0207H 518- 519 AO1 Float R 0208H- 0209H 520- 521 AO2 Float R 020AH- 020BH 522- 523 DI1 Count Value UINT32 R 020CH- 020DH 524- 525 DI2 Count Value UINT32 R NOTE: The high byte is followed by the low byte. Running Time The data space below is for running time; function code: 03 Read. Table B-15 Running Time Address Table Address (Hex) Address (dec) Parameter Range Data Type Property 0280H-0281H 640- 641 Meter run- ning time 0 ~ 999999999 long R 0282H- 0283H 642- 643 Load run- ning time 0 ~ 999999999 long R V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 71 V: AcuDC 240 Series DC Energy & Power meters Energy The data space below is for energy; Function Code: 03 Read; 16 Write Table B-16 Energy and Charge (Ah) Address Table Address (Hex) Address (dec) Parameter Range Data Type Property 0300H- 0301H 768- 769 Import energy 0 ~ 999999999 long R/W 0302H- 0303H 770- 771 Export energy 0 ~ 999999999 long R/W 0304H- 0305H 772- 773 Total energy 0 ~ 999999999 long R/W 0306H- 0307H 774- 775 Net energy 0 ~ ± 999999999 long R/W 0308H- 0309H 776- 777 Import Ah 0 ~ 999999999 long R/W 030AH- 030BH 778- 779 Export Ah 0 ~ 999999999 long R/W 030CH- 030DH 780- 781 Total Ah 0 ~ 999999999 long R/W 030EH- 030FH 782- 783 Net Ah 0 ~ ± 999999999 long R/W The relationship between the register value and the real value (Rx is the register value). Table B-17 The relationship between Register Value and Real Value Parameter Relationship Unit Voltage Real=Rx V Current Real=Rx A Power Real=Rx kW Energy Real=Rx/100 kWh Ah Real=Rx/100 Ah AO Real=Rx V or mA(depends on the AO Type) Running Time Real=Rx/100 Hour 721.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 accuenergy.com accuenergy.com Appendix Real-Time Clock Area (Data obtained only by AcuDC 243 meter equipped with storage function.) Table B-18 Real Time Clock Address Table Address (Hex) Address (dec) Parameter Range Data Type Property 0284H 644 Year 2000 ~ 2099 Word R/W 0285H 645 Month 1 ~ 12 Word R/W 0286H 646 Day 1 ~ 31 Word R/W 0287H 647 Hour 0 ~ 59 Word R/W 0288H 648 Minute 0 ~ 59 Word R/W 0289H 649 Second 0 ~ 59 Word R/W MAX records (Data obtained only by AcuDC 243 meter equipped with storage function.) Function code: 03H for reading Table B-19 MAX Records Address Table Address (Hex) Parameter Range Data Type Property 0400H- 0401H Voltage MAX Float R 0402H Time of occurrence, Year, Month, Day, Hour, Minute, Second High byte: year; low byte: month 0403H High byte: day; low byte: hour Word R 0404H High byte: minute; low byte: second 0405H- 0406H Current MAX Float R 0407H Time of occurrence, Year, Month, Day, Hour, Minute, Second High byte: year; low byte: month 0408H High byte: day; low byte: hour Word R 0409H High byte: minute; low byte: second 040AH- 040BH Power MAX Float R 040CH Time of occurrence, Year, Month, Day, Hour, Minute, Second High byte: year; low byte: month 040DH High byte: day; low byte: hour Word R 040EH High byte: minute; low byte: second V: 1.0 Revised: Jan. 2018 73


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PDF Content Summary: See inside for Indications and Important Safety Information. Your FreeStyle Libre 14 day System IN-SERVICE GUIDE Important Safety Information Indications For Use The FreeStyle Libre 14 day Flash Glucose Monitoring System is a continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) device indicated for the management of diabetes in persons age 18 and older. It is designed to replace blood glucose testing for diabetes treatment decisions. The System detects trends and tracks patterns aiding in the detection of episodes of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia, facilitating both acute and long-term therapy adjustments. Interpretation of the System readings should be based on the glucose trends and several sequential readings over time. The System is intended for single patient use and requires a prescription. Contraindications MRI/CT/Diathermy: The System must be removed prior to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Computed Tomography (CT) scan, or high-frequency electrical heat (diathermy) treatment. The effect of MRI, CT scans, or diathermy on the performance of the System has not been evaluated. The exposure may damage the Sensor and may impact proper function of the device which could cause incorrect readings. WARNINGS: • Do not ignore symptoms that may be due to low or high blood glucose: if you are experiencing symptoms that are not consistent with your glucose readings, consult your health care professional. • Check Sensor glucose readings by conducting a fingerstick test with a blood glucose meter under the following conditions, when Sensor glucose readings may not be accurate and should not be used to make a diabetes treatment decision: o If you suspect that your reading may be inaccurate for any reason o When you are experiencing symptoms that may be due to low or high blood glucose o When you are experiencing symptoms that do not match the Sensor glucose readings o During the first 12 hours of wearing a FreeStyle Libre 14 day Sensor o During times of rapidly changing glucose (more than 2 mg/dL per minute) o When the Sensor glucose reading does not include a Current Glucose number or Glucose Trend Arrow o In order to confirm hypoglycemia or impending hypoglycemia as reported by the Sensor o When you see the symbol, you must check your blood glucose with a blood glucose meter before making any treatment decisions. Sensor readings may not accurately reflect blood glucose levels. o If you are using the FreeStyle LibreLink app, you must also have access to a blood glucose monitoring system as the App does not provide one. • Hypoglycemic unawareness: The System has not been evaluated for use in patients with hypoglycemic unawareness and will not automatically alert you of a hypoglycemic event without you scanning your Sensor. • No alarms without a Sensor scan: The System does not have alarms that will automatically notify you when you are having a severe low (hypoglycemic) or high (hyperglycemic) glucose event unless you scan your Sensor. For example, the System does not have an alarm that can alert or wake you when you are sleeping in the case of low or high glucose. • Choking hazard: The System contains small parts that may be dangerous if swallowed. Important Safety Information Important Safety Information What to know about Alarms/Alerts: • There are NO alarms or alerts unless you scan the Sensor. What to know before using the System: • Review all product information before use. • Take standard precautions for transmission of blood borne pathogens to avoid contamination. Who should not use the System: • Do not use the System in people less than 18 years of age. The System is not approved for use in people under 18 years of age and Sensor readings in this population may be inaccurate. In general, continuous glucose monitoring systems are recognized to be less accurate in children than in adults. • Do not use the System in critically ill patients. The System is not approved for use in these patients. It is not known how different conditions or medications common to the critically ill population may affect performance of the System. Sensor glucose readings may be inaccurate in critically ill patients. • Do not use the System in pregnant women or persons on dialysis. The System is not approved for use in pregnant women or persons on dialysis and has not been evaluated in these populations. • Performance of the System when used with other implanted medical devices, such as pacemakers, has not been evaluated. What should you know about wearing a Sensor: • After the start-up period, the Sensor can be worn for up to the wear duration specified in your Sensor Kit’s product insert. • Some individuals may be sensitive to the adhesive that keeps the Sensor attached to the skin. If you notice significant skin irritation around or under your Sensor, remove the Sensor and stop using the System. Contact your health care professional before continuing to use the System. • Intense exercise may cause your Sensor to loosen due to sweat or movement of the Sensor. Remove and replace your Sensor if it starts to loosen and follow the instructions to select an appropriate application site. • The System uses all available glucose data to give you readings so you should scan your Sensor at least once every 8 hours for the most accurate performance. Scanning less frequently may result in decreased performance. If you are using both the App and Reader with the same Sensor, be sure to scan frequently with both devices. • Do not reuse Sensors. The Sensor and Sensor Applicator are designed for single use. Reuse may result in no glucose readings and infection. Not suitable for re-sterilization. Further exposure to irradiation may cause inaccurate results. • If a Sensor breaks inside your body, call your health care professional. How to Store the Sensor Kit: • Store the Sensor Kit between 39°F and 77°F. Storage outside of this range may cause inaccurate Sensor glucose readings. While you don’t need to keep your Sensor Kit in a refrigerator, you can as long as the refrigerator is between 39°F and 77°F. Do not freeze. • Store the Sensor Kit between 10-90% non-condensing humidity. When not to use the System: • Do NOT use if the Sensor Kit package, Sensor Pack or Sensor Applicator appear to be damaged or already opened due to risk of no results and/or infection. • Do NOT use if Sensor Kit contents are past expiration date. • Do NOT use if the Reader appears to be damaged due to risk of electric shock and/or no results. Important Safety Information

Important Safety Information Cautions and Limitations Below are important cautions and limitations to keep in mind so you can use the System safely. They are grouped into categories for easy reference. What to know before you Apply the Sensor: • The Sensor Pack and Sensor Applicator are packaged as a set (separately from the Reader) and have the same Sensor code. Check that the Sensor codes match before using your Sensor Pack and Sensor Applicator. Do not use Sensor Packs and Sensor Applicators with different Sensor codes together as this will result in incorrect glucose readings. • Clean the application site and ensure that it is dry prior to Sensor insertion. This helps the Sensor stay attached to your body. • Clean hands prior to Sensor handling/insertion to help prevent infection. • Change the application site for the next Sensor application to prevent discomfort or skin irritation. • Sensor placement is not approved for sites other than the back of the arm. If placed in other areas, the Sensor may not function properly. CODE FreeStyle L Sensor Pa XXX XXXXXXXXX FreeStyle L Sensor Pa XXX XXXXXXXXX FreeStyle L Sensor Pa XXX XXXXXXXXX YYYY-MM-D

• Select an appropriate Sensor site to help the Sensor stay attached to the body and prevent discomfort or skin irritation. Avoid areas with scars, moles, stretch marks, or lumps. Select an area of skin that generally stays flat during normal daily activities (no bending or folding). Choose a site that is at least 1 inch away from an insulin injection site. When is Sensor Glucose different from Blood Glucose: • Physiological differences between the interstitial fluid and capillary blood may result in differences in glucose readings between the System and results from a fingerstick test using a blood glucose meter. Differences in glucose readings between interstitial fluid and capillary blood may be observed during times of rapid change in blood glucose, such as after eating, dosing insulin, or exercising. What to know about interfering substances such as Vitamin C and Aspirin: • Taking ascorbic acid (vitamin C) while wearing the Sensor may falsely raise Sensor glucose readings. Taking salicylic acid (used in some pain relievers such as aspirin and some skin care products) may slightly lower Sensor glucose readings. The level of inaccuracy depends on the amount of the interfering substance active in the body. • Test results did not indicate interference for methyldopa (used in some drugs to treat high blood pressure) or tolbutamide (infrequently used in some drugs to treat diabetes in the US) at maximum circulating levels. However, concentrations of potential interferents in interstitial fluid are unknown compared to circulating blood. What to know about X-Rays: • The Sensor should be removed prior to exposing it to an X-ray machine. The effect of X-rays on the performance of the System has not been evaluated. The exposure may damage the Sensor and may impact proper function of the device to detect trends and track patterns in glucose values during the wear period. When to remove the Sensor: • If the Sensor is becoming loose or if the Sensor tip is coming out of your skin, you may get no readings or unreliable readings, which may not match how you feel. Check to make sure your Sensor has not come loose. If it has come loose, remove it and apply a new one. • If you believe your glucose readings are not correct or are inconsistent with how you feel, perform a blood glucose test on your finger to confirm your glucose. If the problem continues, remove the current Sensor and apply a new one. Important Safety Information Important Safety Information What to do if you are dehydrated: • Severe dehydration and excessive water loss may cause inaccurate Sensor glucose readings. If you believe you are suffering from dehydration, consult your health care professional immediately. What to know about the Reader’s Built-in Meter: • The FreeStyle Libre 14 day Reader has a built-in blood glucose meter that is designed to be used only with FreeStyle Precision Neo blood glucose test strips and MediSense Glucose and Ketone Control Solution. Using other test strips with the Reader’s built-in meter will produce an error or cause the Reader’s built-in meter to not turn on or start a test. The Reader’s built-in meter does not have ketone testing functionality. • The Reader’s built-in meter is not for use on people who are dehydrated, hypotensive, in shock, or for individuals in hyperglycemic-hyperosmolar state, with or without ketosis. • The Reader’s built-in meter is not for use on neonates, in critically-ill patients, or for diagnosis or screening of diabetes. • See Using the Reader’s Built-in meter section of the Reader Kit User’s Manual for additional important information on the use of the Reader’s built-in meter. Where to charge your Reader: • Be sure to select a location for charging that allows the power adapter to be easily unplugged. Do NOT block access to the charger due to the potential risk of electrical shock. What to know about FreeStyle LibreLink: • FreeStyle LibreLink installed on a smartphone is intended for use by a single person. It must not be used by more than one person due to the risk of misinterpreting glucose information. • FreeStyle LibreLink and FreeStyle Libre 14 day Readers do not share data. For complete information on a device, be sure to scan your Sensor every 8 hours with that device; otherwise, your reports will not include all your data. Important Safety Information Getting to Know Your System

• The reader or app scans the sensor for glucose readings and stores up to 90 days of glucose history • The reader or app activates the sensor and initiates the 1-hour warm up period • The reader is rechargeable • The sensor is worn on the back of the upper arm and stores glucose readings every 15 minutes • Follow the instructions to prepare and apply the sensor • The sensor may be worn for up to 14 days with no fingersticks for calibration or insulin dosing* FreeStyle LibreLink App Touch Screen See User’s Manual for instruction on setting up the reader for the first time. *Lancing is not required except when symptoms do not match glucose reading, when reader prompts a blood glucose test, or when glucose readings are not available with system. Your System Reader USB Port Home Button

Sensor Applicator Sensor Pack Codes on labels must match Sensor Application 1 Assemble sensor and apply it to your body Sensor Application TIP: TIP: Select an area on the back of the upper arm that generally The area MUST be clean and dry stays flat during normal daily activities (no bending or folding). or the sensor may not stick to the site. STEP 4 TIP: Assemble on a hard surface, such as a table. STEP 7 TIP: For video of sensor application, visit MyFreeStyle.com/provider/resources STEP 1 Select site on back of your upper arm. Do not use other sites as these are not approved and may result in inaccurate glucose readings. Note: Avoid scars, moles, stretch marks, lumps, and insulin injection sites. To prevent skin irritation, rotate sites between applications. Place sensor applicator over site and push down firmly to apply sensor. CAUTION: Do not push down on sensor applicator until placed over prepared site to prevent unintended results or injury. Line up dark mark on sensor applicator with dark mark on sensor pack. On a hard surface, press down firmly on sensor applicator until it comes to a stop and you hear an audible click. STEP 2 STEP 5 STEP 8 Clean application site with an alcohol wipe. Allow site to dry completely before proceeding. Lift sensor applicator straight out of sensor pack. Gently pull back applicator to remove, leaving sensor on body. STEP 6 STEP 9 STEP 3 Make sure sensor is secure by gently pressing adhesive to the skin. Discard used sensor applicator and sensor pack according to local regulations. Sensor applicator is ready to apply sensor. CAUTION: Sensor applicator now contains a needle. Do not touch inside sensor applicator or put it back into sensor pack. Peel lid completely off sensor pack. Unscrew cap from sensor applicator. CAUTION: Sensor codes must match on sensor pack and sensor applicator or glucose readings will be incorrect. Start New Sensor 2 Start new sensor with reader STEP 1 STEP 2 STEP 3 Touch Start Hold reader New Sensor. within 1.5 inches (4 cm) of sensor to scan it. Sensor can be used to check your glucose after 1 hour. 3 Start new sensor with app Tap the scan button. If you would like to use both your reader and your app during your sensor wear, scan the sensor first with your reader and then with your app. After the 1-hour warm up period, the sensor can be worn for up to 14 days. Your sensor automatically stops working after 14 days of data and must be replaced. Work with your healthcare provider to choose and enter a custom target range on your reader. Start New Sensor STEP 1 STEP 2 STEP 3 Hold the top of your The Sensor can iPhone near the Sensor. be used to check Hold still until you your glucose after hear a tone and/or the startup period. feel a vibration. This While the Sensor completes the scan. is starting up, you can navigate away from the App. Press Home Button to turn on reader. NOTE: If using reader for the first time, follow the prompts to set date, time, and target glucose range. 10:23pm No Active Sensor Start New Sensor Review History Start New Sensor If you would like to use both your reader and your app during your sensor wear, scan the sensor first with your reader and then with your app. After the 1-hour warm up period, the sensor can be worn for up to 14 days. Your sensor automatically stops working after 14 days of data and must be replaced. Work with your healthcare provider to choose and enter a custom target range on your reader. First Time App Setup How to do it: Check that your smartphone is connected to a network (WiFi or cellular). Download FreeStyle LibreLink from the App Store. Open the App. Swipe left to view some helpful tips or tap GET STARTED NOW. Confirm your country and tap NEXT. You need a LibreView account to use the App. Follow onscreen instructions to review legal information and create a new account or login to your existing account. LibreView Data Management Software is developed and distributed by Newyu, Inc. Use of FreeStyle LibreLink requires registration with LibreView, a service provided by Abbott and Newyu, Inc. Confirm your glucose unit of measure and tap NEXT. Set your Target Glucose Range and tap NEXT. Work with your health care professional to determine your Target Glucose Range. Select how you count carbohydrates and tap NEXT. The App now displays some important information. Tap NEXT to move through the screens. Start New Sensor Accessing Your Glucose Data You can scan to get a real-time glucose reading anytime. The reader stores up to 90 days of data. Check your glucose Adding notes Select the checkbox next to the information you’d like to add. Options include insulin, food, exercise, and any medication you take. Touch OK to save your notes. Notes are viewable in the logbook. Getting Glucose Data Glucose Going High 350 250 15050236 mgdL 6am 10am2 pm STEP 1 From the Glucose Reading screen, add a note by touching the in the upper right corner of the screen. Add Notes OK Rapid-Acting Insulin +Long-Acting Insulin +Food +1 / 4 STEP 3 Press Home Button to turn on reader OR touch Check Glucose from the Home Screen. For app use, press main menu and tap home to return to the App Home Screen. Tap “Check Glucose” at the bottom of your screen when you are ready to scan. OK Add Notes Rapid-Acting Insulin Long-Acting Insulin Food 1 / 4 STEP 2 Hold reader within 1.5 inches (4 cm) of sensor to scan it. NOTE: If the sensor is not successfully scanned within 15 seconds, the reader displays a prompt to scan the sensor again. Touch OK to return to the Home Screen and touch Check Glucose to scan your sensor. Glucose Going High 350 250 15050236 mgdL 6am 10am 2pm Both reader and app show your glucose reading along with your glucose graph and an arrow indicating the direction your glucose is going. Accessing Your Glucose Data You can scan to get a real-time glucose reading anytime. The reader stores up to 90 days of data. Adding notes How to do it with the App:

Tap the symbol on the My Glucose screen. GLUCOSE IN RANGE 8:06 AM Select the checkbox next to the note you would like to add. mg/dL After you check the box, you can add more specific information to your note. 350 Tap DONE to save your note. 300 250

200 150 1005012AM 3PM 6AM ADD NOTE Getting Glucose Data App Home Screen The App Home Screen provides access to information about glucose readings and the App. To return to the Home Screen from another screen, go to the Main Menu and tap Home.

Main Menu Tap to access the Home Screen, Logbook, other history options, and the Share option. You can also access Settings, Help, and other information. Glucose Graph Graph of your stored Sensor glucose readings. Scan Button Tap this button or the symbol at the top of the screen when you’re ready to scan your Sensor. Scan Button Tap this symbol or the buttom at the bottom of the screen when you’re ready to scan your Sensor. Glucose Information Your Time in Target, information about your last scan, and average glucose for the last 24 hours. Glucose History

Review Your History The system provides insightful information to identify 7-, 14-, 30-, and 90-day trends. Average Glucose OK Information about Daily Graph OK Sensor glucose Daily Patterns OK The pattern and Average: 119 mg/dLthe average sensor glucose (mg/dL)readings by day2 (mg/dL) variability of your 350 350 sensor glucose 121 152 134 readings1 250 150250 over a typical day2,3,4 15069 50 50 am 12am 6 pm 12 pm 6 am 12 12612612 12612612am am pm pm am am am pm pm am Last 7 Days 22 Feb Wednesday Last 7 Days Low Glucose OK The number of Sensor Usage OK Report on how OK The percentage of Events low glucose often you scan time glucose events measured Scans Per Day 3 the sensor Sensor captured data 81%34%readings were 54% 12% Time In Target Total Events: 10 Above 6 In Target above, below, or 3 1 0 am 12am 6 pm 12 pm 6 am 12 Belowwithin Target Glucose Range1 Target Range 100-140 mg/dL Last 7 Days Last 7 Days Last 7 Days 1. Readings above or below your Target Glucose Range are orange, while readings in range are blue. 2. The thick black line shows the median (midpoint) of your glucose readings. 3. The gray shading represents a range (10-90 percentiles) of your sensor readings. This is not the Ambulatory Glucose Profile. 4. Daily Patterns needs at least 5 days of glucose data. Glucose History STEP 1 STEP 3 Press Home Button to turn on the reader and go to Home Screen. STEP 2 Review History 10:23pm Ends in 10 days Logbook Daily Graph Check Average Glucose Glucose 1 / 2 Review History Touch Review History. Daily Patterns Time In Target Low Glucose Events Sensor Usage Use the arrows to view the available options.

Review Your History The system provides insightful information to identify 7-, 14-, 30-, and 90-day trends. Sensor glucose readings collected in the last 7, 14, 30, and 90 days. Sensor scan results from each day. You can also use the Logbook to manually enter your blood glucose test results. Sensor Sensor glucose glucose readings collected readings collected in the last 7, 14, 30, in the last 7, 14, 30, and 90 days. and 90 days. Sensor glucose readings collected in the last 7, 14, 30, and 90 days. Sensor glucose readings from each day. Glucose History Sensor glucose readings collected in the last 7, 14, 30, and 90 days.

Maintenance and Disposal Your sensor automatically stops working after 14 days of data is collected and must be replaced. You should also replace your sensor if you notice any irritation or discomfort at the application site or if the reader reports a problem with the sensor currently in use. Discard the used sensor in accordance with all applicable local regulations related to the disposal of electronic equipment, batteries, and materials potentially exposed to body fluids. *Clorox Healthcare Bleach Germicidal Wipes may be purchased at major online retailers, such as Walmart.com, Amazon.com, and OfficeDepot.com. Maintenance & Disposal Pull up the edge of the adhesive that keeps the sensor attached to the skin. Slowly peel away from the skin in one motion. If you removed your last sensor before it ended, you will be prompted to confirm that you would like to start a new sensor when you first scan it. When you are ready to apply a new sensor, follow the instructions previously outlined. NOTE: Any remaining adhesive residue on the skin can be removed with warm soapy water or isopropyl alcohol. You should clean and disinfect the reader once a week. Use Clorox Healthcare Bleach Germicidal Wipes.* NOTE: Turn off the reader before you clean and disinfect it. For cleaning, wipe outside surfaces of the reader with one bleach wipe. For disinfection, use a second bleach wipe to wipe outside surfaces of the reader until surfaces are wet. NOTE: Make sure liquid does not get into the test strip and USB ports. Allow the reader surfaces to remain wet for 60 seconds. After 1 full minute, immediately dry with a clean paper towel to remove any residual moisture. When finished, thoroughly wash your hands with soap and water. Interpreting Sensor Readings Sensor glucose readings appear after scanning your sensor. Before making treatment decisions, it is important to understand your sensor readings. Use all of the information on the screen when deciding what to do or what treatment decision to make. What you see in the App Message Tap for more information. Current Glucose Glucose from your latest scan. Glucose Trend Arrow Direction your glucose is going. Rapid-Acting Insulin Note Glucose Graph Graph of your current and stored glucose readings. Add Notes Tap to add notes to your glucose reading. NOTE: While sensor glucose readings are gathered in the system range of 40-500 mg/dL, the graph display range is 0-350 mg/dL for ease of review on screen. Glucose readings above 350 mg/dL are displayed at 350 mg/dL. NOTE: The symbol may appear, indicating the reader time was changed. Gaps in the graph may result or glucose readings may be hidden. Sensor Readings ! GLUCOSE GOING LOW Glucose Going Low Glucose Trend Arrow Check Blood mg/dL Glucose symbol 350 Current 300 Glucose 250 200 150 Target 100Glucose Range 50 3PM 6PM 9PM ADD NOTE When Glucose you Check Blood see this symbol, do a blood glucose 82 test before making treatment decisions Food Note mg dL Tap for more information. 350 250 150502pm 6pm 10pm Trend Arrows The Glucose Trend Arrow indicates which direction your glucose is going. Glucose is rising quickly (more than 2 mg/dL per minute) Glucose is rising (between 1 and 2 mg/dL per minute) Glucose is changing slowly (less than 1 mg/dL per minute) Glucose is falling (between 1 and 2 mg/dL per minute) Glucose is falling quickly (more than 2 mg/dL per minute) NOTE: The Glucose Trend Arrow may not always appear with your reading. When there is no Glucose Trend Arrow, the system can’t tell if your glucose is rising quickly or falling quickly and will display the symbol. Whenever you see this symbol, you should do a blood glucose test and treat based on that result. Sensor Readings Trend Arrows Using FreeStyle Libre 14 Day System Trend Arrows for Insulin Dose Adjustments Insulin Dose Adjustments Using the FreeStyle Libre System Trend Arrows in Adults: Pre-Meal and Corrections ≥ 4 Hours Post-meal Insulin Dose Adjustments FreeStyle Libre Trend Arrows Figure 2. Insulin dose adjustments for adults using trend arrows in the FreeStyle Libre systems. Our recommended approach to adjusting insulin dose using trend arrow data in the FreeStyle Libre systems assumes that the patient has insulin-requiring diabetes, is using rapid-acting insulin for meals and correction, and is using insulin-to-carbohydrate ratio (ICR) and correction factors (CFs) that have been optimized as much as possible. The approach is based on anticipated glucose change and typical insulin sensitivity ranges in adults. The approach utilizes a simple approach to insulin dose calculation: Total insulin dose = food ± correction ± arrow adjustment. It provides adjustments in terms of insulin units over the range of insulin sensitivities to minimize additional calculations. It is generally recommended to start adjusting conservatively and at mealtime to understand how the recommendations impact individual glucose responses. Adjusting the insulin dose using trend arrows does not replace but, rather, adds to standard calculations using ICR and CFs. Importantly, a single arrow up may require additional corrections due to unknown velocity of glucose increase (e.g., >2 mg/dL). The CF (in mg/dL) indicates glucose lowering per unit of rapid-acting insulin. Conversion: mg/dL x 0.0555 = mmol/L. Kudva et al. Journal of the Endocrine Society, Volume 2, Issue 12, 1 December 2018, Pages 1320–1337, doi.org/10.1210/js.2018-00294 Sensor Readings Considerations Mealtime is ideal to begin applying insulin dose adjustments using trend arrows. For the 4 hours following a meal, refer to Figure 3 for an approach to minimize hypo- and hyperglycemia during this timeframe. Correction Factor* (CF) For rapidly rising sensor glucose (UP arrow;) at pre-meal, consider administering insulin 15-30 minutes <25 25 - <50 50 - <75 ≥75 before eating. +3.5 units +2.5 units +1.5 units +1.0 units For rapidly falling sensor glucose (DOWN arrow;): • Pre-meal: consider administering insulin closer to the meal • Near or lower than 150 mg/dL: consider holding pre-meal insulin dose until glucose trends have +2.5 units +1.5 units +1.0 units +0.5 units stabilized No adjustment No adjustment No adjustment No adjustment For frail or older adults, start conservatively to reduce hypoglycemia risk: • Upward arrows: reduce dose increase by at least 50% (e.g., +1.0 units may become +0.5 units or no insulin increase) -2.5 units -1.5 units -1.0 units -0.5 units • Downward arrows: increase dose reduction by at least 50% (e.g., -1.0 units may become -1.5 or -2.0 units) -3.5 units -2.5 units -1.5 units -1.0 units When rounding of insulin dose is needed: Insulin does adjustments using trend arrows do not replace standard calculations using ICR and • Calculate total insulin dose using insulin dosing parameters for food intake (if any), correction, and trend arrow adjustment CF. Adjustments are increases or decreases of rapid-acting insulin in addition to calculations using • Round to the nearest whole number or half unit as appropriate ICR and CF. Adjustments using trend arrows are an additional step to standard care. • If at a midpoint (i.e., 0.5 units) and needing to round to a whole number: o Round up when flat or upward arrow is present *Correction factor (CF) is in mg/dL and indicates glucose lowering per unit of rapid-acting insulin. o Round down when downward arrow is present Illustrative Examples of Using Trend Arrows Case scenarios assume patients have insulin-requiring diabetes and are using a FreeStyle Libre system. Case scenarios assume ICR and CF values have been accurately determined by the patient’s healthcare team and that the patient is administering rapid-acting insulin for boluses and corrections. SCENARIOS OF GLUCOSE RATE OF CHANGE Upward Trend Arrow: A 44-year-old man with T1D on CSII therapy is about to eat a meal with 45 g of carbohydrate. His sensor glucose value is 164 mg/dL and an angle up trend arrow is present. Based on the parameters below, he determines 4.5 units are needed for his meal and 1.1 units for correction. An additional 1.5 units is suggested to account for the angle up trend arrow. A Sensor 164 mg/dL Sensor Readings Arrow Target Carb Insulin 120 mg/dL 0 g Values Dose Adjustment CF-40 ICR-1:10 Food Correction 4.5 units 1.1 units Trend Arrow +1.5 units Total Dose 7.1 units B Downward Trend Arrow: A 59-year-old woman with T2D on MDI therapy scans her sensor before leaving a late day of work and sees a glucose value of 194 mg/dL and a straight down trend arrow. It has been 6 hours since her last meal. Fingerstick confirms the sensor glucose value. Based on the parameters below, she determines 3.7 units would be needed to correct for the high glucose; however, based on the anticipated falling glucose, she is suggested to subtract 3.5 units. Because she is on MDI therapy, she will take no insulin and continue to scan periodically. Sensor 194 mg/dL Arrow Target Carb Insulin 120 mg/dL 0 g Values Dose Adjustment CF-20 ICR-1:7 Food Correction 0 units 3.7 units Trend Arrow -3.5 units Total Dose 0 units POST-MEAL MONITORING AND TREATMENT C Post-meal: A 29-year-old man with T1D on CSII therapy scans his sensor 2 hours after eating dinner to see a glucose value of 150 mg/dL and flat trend arrow. Although the glucose value is above target, he follows post-meal suggestions (Figure 3) and does not take additional insulin. This will prevent insulin stacking. Importantly, a flat trend arrow does not indicate zero change; a flat trend arrow represents <1 mg/dL/min rate of glucose change (i.e., ±30 mg/dL in 30 minutes). He will rescan in 1 hour to continue monitoring. Sensor 150 mg/dL Arrow Target Carb Insulin 120 mg/dL 0 g Values Dose Adjustment CF-35 ICR-1:12 Food 0 units Correction 0 units Trend Arrow NA Total Dose 0 units PRE-EXERCISE PLANNING FOR AEROBIC EXERCISE D Pre-exercise: A 50-year-old man with T2D on MDI therapy is planning to walk 3 miles within 1 hour very soon; the time is 4:00pm. He scans his sensor in preparation and sees a glucose value of 128 mg/dL and a flat trend arrow. This person is likely to experience falling glucose during his planned exercise. As a precaution to avoid hypoglycemia, he ingests 15g of fast-acting carbohydrate before beginning his walk. He will rescan after 30 minutes at a minimum to continue monitoring and ensure safe exercise. Sensor 128 mg/dL Arrow Target Carb Insulin 120 mg/dL 15 g Values Dose Adjustment CF-30 ICR-1:9 Food Correction 0 units 0 units Trend Arrow 0 units Total Dose 0 units E Pre-exercise: A 23-year-old woman with T1D on CSII therapy is preparing to run 3 miles as a training for an upcoming race. She scans her sensor in preparation and sees a glucose value of 220 mg/dL and an angle down trend arrow. This person is likely to experience falling glucose during her planned exercise. Additionally, her angle down trend arrow indicates falling glucose. However, her current glucose is well above target range. She will start her planned run without taking a corrective insulin dose or fast-acting carbohydrate. Instead, she will continue monitoring by rescanning every 30 minutes at a minimum to prevent hypoglycemia. Sensor 220 mg/dL Arrow Target 120 mg/dL Carb 0 g Values Insulin Dose Adjustment CF-70 ICR-1:25 Food 0 units Correction 0 units Trend Arrow 0 units Total Dose 0 units Going High/Low Reading Messages will appear on the Reader when glucose readings are trending.

If your glucose is projected to be higher than 240 mg/dL or lower than 70 mg/dL within 15 minutes, a message will appear on the screen. Touch the message button for more information and set a reminder to check your glucose again. Sensor Readings Glucose Going Low 72 mgdL 350 Glucose Going High 237 mgdL Glucose Going High 237 mgdL Glucose Going High 237 mgdL 350 If your glucose reading is less than 70 mg/dL, projected to be less than 70 mg/dL, rapidly changing, or there is no number or trend arrow, you will see this symbol . You can touch the symbol for more information. Check your blood glucose on your finger with a test strip before making treatment decisions. If your glucose reading is less than 70 mg/dL, projected to be less than 70 mg/dL, rapidly changing, or there is no number or trend arrow, you will see this symbol . You can touch the symbol for more information. Check your blood glucose on your finger with a test strip before making treatment decisions. If your glucose reading is less than 70 mg/dL, projected to be less than 70 mg/dL, rapidly changing, or there is no number or trend arrow, you will see this symbol . You can touch the symbol for more information. Check your blood glucose on your finger with a test strip before making treatment decisions. 250 150502pm6 m6 pm 10pm DISPLAY WHAT TO DO 250 150502pm6 m6 150502pm6 m6 pm 10pm pm 10pm pm 10pm If your glucose reading is less than 70 mg/dL, projected to be less than 70 mg/dL, rapidly changing, or there is no number or trend arrow, you will see this symbol . You can touch the symbol for more information. Check your blood glucose on your finger with a test strip before making treatment decisions. If your glucose reading is less than 70 mg/dL, projected to be less than 70 mg/dL, rapidly changing, or there is no number or trend arrow, you will see this symbol . You can touch the symbol for more information. Check your blood glucose on your finger with a test strip before making treatment decisions. If your glucose reading is less than 70 mg/dL, projected to be less than 70 mg/dL, rapidly changing, or there is no number or trend arrow, you will see this symbol . You can touch the symbol for more information. Check your blood glucose on your finger with a test strip before making treatment decisions. If your glucose reading is less than 70 mg/dL, projected to be less than 70 mg/dL, rapidly changing, or there is no number or trend arrow, you will see this symbol . You can touch the symbol for more information. Check your blood glucose on your finger with a test strip before making treatment decisions. If your glucose reading is less than 70 mg/dL, projected to be less than 70 mg/dL, rapidly changing, or there is no number or trend arrow, you will see this symbol . You can touch the symbol for more information. Check your blood glucose on your finger with a test strip before making treatment decisions. If your glucose reading is less than 70 mg/dL, projected to be less than 70 mg/dL, rapidly changing, or there is no number or trend arrow, you will see this symbol . You can touch the symbol for more information. Check your blood glucose on your finger with a test strip before making treatment decisions.

High/Low Reading Messages will appear on the Reader when the glucose reading is high or low. Sensor Readings WHAT DISPLAY TO DO If your glucose is higher than 240 mg/dL or lower than 70 mg/dL, you will see a message on the screen. You can touch the message button for more information and set a reminder to check your glucose. You will see this symbol . Check your blood glucose on your finger with a test strip before making treatment decisions. Low Glucose 63 mgdL 350 250 150502pm 6pm 10pm Low Glucose 63 mgdL 350 250 150502pm 6pm 10pm

HI/LO Reading Current Glucose will display HI or LO when glucose readings are outside measuring range. Sensor Readings 350 250 150502pm 6pm 10pm Low GlucoseLO WHAT DISPLAY TO DO If LO appears on the reader, your reading is lower than 40 mg/dL. If HI appears on the reader, your reading is higher than 500 mg/dL. You can touch the message button for more information. Check mgdL your blood glucose on your finger with a test strip. If you get a second LO or HI result, contact your healthcare professional immediately. You will see this symbol . Check your blood glucose on your finger with a test strip before making treatment decisions. 350 250 150502pm 6pm 10pm High GlucoseHI mgdL

Treatment Decisions–Getting Started Before you start using the FreeStyle Libre 14 day System for treatment decisions, make sure you have a good understanding of how the system works for your body. • Continue to use your blood glucose meter for treatment decisions until you are comfortable with the information you receive • Getting familiar with the system could take days, weeks, or even months • Work with your healthcare professional to put together a plan for making treatment decisions • Scan often to see how carbs, medication, exercise, illness, or stress levels impact your sensor glucose readings HELPFUL TIPS m6 Treatment Decisions CONFIRM SENSOR GLUCOSE READINGS Confirm your Sensor glucose readings with a blood glucose meter until you understand: • Sensor accuracy may vary between sensors • Sensor accuracy may vary during a sensor wear session • Sensor accuracy may vary in different situations (meals, exercise, first day of use, etc.) 350 UNDERSTAND YOUR INSULIN 250 Understand how your insulin works, including how long it takes to start working and how long 150it lasts in your body. 502pm6 pm 10pm NOTE: Making a treatment decision doesn’t just mean taking insulin. Treatment decisions can include taking fast-acting carbs, eating, or doing nothing and scanning again later. AVOID “INSULIN STACKING” If your glucose is high and going up, your first instinct may be to take more insulin to lower your glucose. However, depending on when you last took insulin or your recent activity, the right treatment decision may be to do nothing and scan again later.

Treatment Decisions–When Not to Use Sensor Readings Treatment Decisions Glucose is Falling Quickly or Rising Quickly Interstitial fluid can be different from blood glucose levels, particularly during times when Whenever your blood glucose is changing quickly, for example, after eating, taking insulin, or exercising. you see this symbol, Low Glucose or Glucose Going Low Message Low sensor glucose readings may not accurately reflect blood glucose. No Glucose Trend Arrow When there is no Glucose Trend Arrow, the system can’t tell if your glucose is rising quickly do a blood or falling quickly. glucose test and treat based on that result! No Current Glucose Number When there is no Current Glucose number, such as when you receive an error message or a LO or HI result, you don’t have enough information to make a treatment decision. During the first 12 hours of wearing a FreeStyle Libre 14 day Sensor During the first 12 hours, you should not use glucose readings from the Sensor to make treatment decisions. You Think Your Readings Are Incorrect Don’t trust sensor glucose readings that you think may be incorrect or that don’t match what you would expect based on your recent activity. For example, if you ate dinner but forgot to take insulin before eating, you would expect your glucose to be high. If your glucose reading is low, then it doesn’t match your recent activity. Don’t make treatment decisions if you think your sensor glucose readings are incorrect. NOTE: The symbol will NOT display in these situations. You Have Low or High Blood Glucose Symptoms Don’t ignore symptoms that may be due to low or high blood glucose. Do a blood glucose test and treat based on that result. Symptoms Don’t Match Reading There may be times when your symptoms don’t match your sensor glucose readings. You may feel shaky, sweaty, and dizzy—symptoms you generally get when you have low glucose—but your glucose is within your target range. Don’t ignore symptoms that may be due to low or high blood glucose. NOTE: The symbol will NOT display in these situations. When checking blood glucose, you can use the reader’s built-in meter to check your blood glucose with FreeStyle Precision Neo test strips. Precision Neo Test Strips are available in the diabetes supply section of your major retail pharmacy. Check for participating locations. Low Glucose Rising Quickly Blood Glucose 100 mg/dL Glucose Sensor Glucose Falling 95 mg/dL Quickly GlucoseLO Sensor Glucose 80 mg/dL Blood Glucose 70 mg/dL 350 Low GlucoseLO mg dL

Treatment Decisions–Glucose Trend Arrows This table provides some information on how you can factor the Glucose Trend Arrow into your treatment decisions. Remember that you should never make a treatment decision based on the Glucose Trend Arrow alone.

Glucose Trend Arrow TREATMENT DECISION CONSIDERATIONS Low Glucose (< 70 mg/dL) Glucose in Target Range High Glucose (> 240 mg/dL)

No Arrow or No Number You will see the symbol. Do not treat based on sensor glucose reading. Do a blood glucose test. You will see the symbol. Do not treat based on sensor glucose reading. Do a blood glucose test.

You will see the symbol. Do not treat based on sensor glucose reading. Do a blood glucose test. If you are about to eat, take insulin to cover your meal. Consider taking a little more since glucose is high and rising. If this is between meals, consider taking an insulin correction dose, unless you have taken insulin recently. If you have taken insulin recently, do nothing and scan again later. Avoid “insulin stacking.” You will see the symbol. Do not treat based on sensor glucose reading. Do a blood glucose test. If you are about to eat, take insulin to cover your meal. Consider taking a little more since glucose is rising. If you have taken insulin recently, do nothing and scan again later. Avoid “insulin stacking.” If you are about to eat, take insulin to cover your meal. Consider taking a little more since glucose is rising. If you have taken insulin recently, do nothing and scan again later. Avoid “insulin stacking.” If you are about to eat, take insulin to cover your meal. Consider taking a little more since glucose is high. If this is between meals, consider taking an insulin correction dose, unless you have taken insulin recently. If you have taken insulin recently, do nothing and scan again later. Avoid “insulin stacking.” You will see the symbol. Do not treat based on sensor glucose reading. Do a blood glucose test. If you are about to eat, take insulin to cover your meal. If this is between meals, do nothing and scan again later. If you are about to eat, take insulin to cover your meal. If this is between meals, do nothing and scan again later. If you are about to eat, take insulin to cover your meal. Consider taking a little less since glucose is falling. If this is between meals, consider doing nothing and scan again later. Avoid “insulin stacking.” If you are about to eat, take insulin to cover your meal. Consider taking a little less since glucose is falling. If this is between meals, consider eating a snack or fast-acting carbohydrates to stay within target and scan again later. If you are about to eat, take insulin to cover your meal. Consider taking a little less since glucose is falling. If this is between meals, consider eating a snack or fast-acting carbohydrates to stay within target and scan again later.

You will see the symbol. Do not treat based on sensor glucose reading. Do a blood glucose test. Consult with your healthcare provider about how to incorporate trend arrow information in to treatment decisions Treatment Decisions Treatment Decisions–Example Scenarios Example scenarios to help you understand how to use all of the information on the screen. The recommendations below are based on a clinical article published in a peer reviewed journal. For more scenarios, consult your FreeStyle Libre 14 day System User Guide. *This method was based on: Pettus J., Edelman S.V. Recommendations for using Real-Time Continuous Glucose Monitoring (rtCGM) Data for Insulin Adjustments in Type 1 Diabetes. Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology. 2017;11:138-147. Treatment Decisions ANNE WHAT ANNE SEES WHAT ANNE DOES Anne has a target of 100 mg/dL and a correction factor of 1:50. This means she would take 1 unit of rapid-acting insulin to lower her glucose about 50 mg/dL. After breakfast After breakfast, Anne sees her glucose is 250 mg/dL. The trend arrow shows it is going down quickly. There is also a message at the top of the screen and the symbol. Anytime Anne sees the symbol, she does a blood glucose test before deciding what to do. Anne uses this information to help guide her insulin dosing decisions. Before lunch Anne sees her glucose is 250 mg/dL and rising. Before eating lunch, Anne takes enough insulin to cover the meal and a little more since her trend arrow was rising . After lunch Ninety minutes later, Anne’s glucose is still 250 mg/dL. The graph shows her glucose is still rising and so does the trend arrow . Anne does not take a correction dose as it is within 2 hours of her meal dose. This could result in “insulin stacking” and low glucose. The insulin she took for her meal may not have reached its full effect. Anne decides to wait and scan again later. Before dinner Anne sees her current glucose is 250 mg/dL. The graph shows that her glucose is going down and so does the trend arrow . Anne considers what might be causing her glucose to go down and what she might do to prevent a low glucose. She considers how much insulin she should take before her meal. Because she sees she considers taking a little less insulin. High Glucose Daily Patterns Report Report collapses up to 14 days of glucose readings into a single 24-hour period to view a patient’s typical day. 190 Average Glucose mg/dL 48% Percent in Target 12am 2am 4am 6am 8am 10am 12pm 2pm 4pm 6pm 8pm 10pm 12am Average Glucose 350 mg/dL mg/dL 300 250 3 Median 200 4 1801 Target Range 150 80100 2 50 12am 2am 4am 6am 8am 10am 12pm 2pm 4pm 6pm 8pm 10pm 12am 1Are the readings within target range? 2Are there patterns of hypoglycemia? 3Identify glucose variability by the shape of the Median curve. The Median curve shows the median glucose value for every time point. Median curve is not flat, indicating glucose variability. 4 Identify glucose variability by the width of the Interquartile Range (IQR). The IQR is the middle 50 percent of the data. The IQR is wide-spread, indicating glucose variability. Simulated patient data for illustrative purposes only; not actual patient data. AGP Hypoglycemia Hyperglycemia Median Variability Enable patients to view data between visits with LibreView Invite patients to your practice. Login to your LibreView account Click “My Patients” icon in the upper left corner of your screen. Select Find Patients to search for existing patient account. If account exists, select patient record and click “Invite to upload from home” at the top of the screen. Fill in the patient email address and click “Save” If there is no patient record, select + Invite Patient on the bottom left of your screen Enter First Name, Last Name, Date of Birth and Email Address Select “Invite” to send an email invitation to your patient Check the status of requested patients on your dashboard by filtering your practice to Pending Patients . Select “Resend” under the Patient’s “Status” column if desired. Additional information available on the Learn More tab at the bottom of your LibreView account screen Simulated patient data for illustrative purposes only; not actual patient data. LibreView When to Contact your Healthcare Professional As instructed by the FreeStyle Libre 14 day labeling. Symptoms • If you are experiencing symptoms that are not consistent with your glucose readings • If you have significant skin irritation around the sensor • If the sensor breaks in your body • If you are suffering from dehydration • If bleeding does not stop after removing sensor Treatment Decisions • To determine how you should use your sensor glucose information to help manage your diabetes • To determine and set your target glucose range • To understand how insulin works • To determine when to do nothing/scan again later • To determine how to use your blood glucose results • To discuss what to do if symptoms don’t match your blood glucose results

Sensor Readings • If you get a LO or HI sensor reading followed by a LO or HI blood glucose result 350 Low GlucoseLO Low GlucoseLO mgdL mgdL • If you are not sure about the reader message or the glucose reading Maintenance and Disposal 150502pm 6pm 10pm

• How to discard a used sensor Contact HCP 250 Frequently Asked Questions Sensor Application How is the sensor applied to the body? The sensor is applied to the back of the upper arm with a simple, disposable device called an applicator. When the sensor is applied, a small (5mm) filament is inserted just under the skin, and held in place with a small adhesive pad. Most patients don’t feel pain when applying the FreeStyle Libre 14 day sensor.* Is it necessary to apply a sensor in a different location if I feel discomfort or in case of a mis-application? To prevent discomfort or skin irritation, you should select a different site other than the one most recently used. When applying the sensor to my arm, do I need to stretch or pinch the skin? No, there is no need to stretch or pinch the skin to apply the sensor. The sensor should be applied only on the back of your upper arm. Avoid areas with scars, moles, stretch marks, or lumps. Select an area of skin that generally stays flat during normal daily activities (no bending or folding). Choose a site that is at least 2.5 cm (1 inch) away from an insulin injection site. To prevent discomfort or skin irritation, you should select a different site other than the one most recently used. For more information please refer to the FreeStyle Libre 14 day User’s Manual. Patient Wear Will the user feel the sensor while wearing it? The portion of the sensor that gets inserted under the skin is less than 0.4 millimeter wide (1mm is about the thickness of a few strands of human hair) and it’s inserted only about 5mm under the skin, so most people will not feel the sensor while it is being worn.* Can users bathe, shower, swim or exercise while wearing a sensor? Yes. The sensor can be worn while bathing, showering, swimming or exercise. The sensor should not be taken below 1 meter of water (3 feet), and should not be submerged in water for more than 30 minutes. The adhesive is designed to keep the sensor securely and comfortably in place for up to 14 days after the warm up period. How long can the sensor be worn? The disposable sensor is designed to adhere to the back of the upper arm and provide accurate glucose readings for up to 14 days after the warm up period. After the 14 days, the user removes the sensor by peeling off the adhesive pad. How do you remove the sensor? Pull up the edge of the adhesive that keeps the sensor attached to the skin. Slowly peel away from the skin in one motion. Note: Any remaining adhesive residue on the skin can be removed with warm soapy water or isopropyl alcohol. What if the user needs to remove the sensor before 14 days (or if it falls off)? Users should remove the sensor and start a new sensor. The reader will identify that it is a new sensor and ask users if they want to start it. If a sensor falls off before 10 days have completed, then the user should call Customer Service at 1-855-632-8658. *Data on file. Abbott Diabetes care. FAQs FreeStyle, Libre, and related brand marks are trademarks of Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. in various jurisdictions. Other trademarks are property of their respective owners. ©2019 Abbott. ADC-10386 v1.0 01/19


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PDF Content Summary: Welcome to Your FreeStyle Libre System IN-SERVICE GUIDE See Indications and Important Safety Information inside. Important Safety Information Indications For Use The FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System is a continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) device indicated for the management of diabetes in persons age 18 and older. It is designed to replace blood glucose testing for diabetes treatment decisions. The System detects trends and tracks patterns aiding in the detection of episodes of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia, facilitating both acute and long-term therapy adjustments. Interpretation of the System readings should be based on the glucose trends and several sequential readings over time. The System is intended for single patient use and requires a prescription. Contraindications MRI/CT/Diathermy: The FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System must be removed prior to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Computed Tomography (CT) scan, or high-frequency electrical heat (diathermy) treatment. The effect of MRI, CT scans, or diathermy on the performance of the System has not been evaluated. The exposure may damage the Sensor and may impact proper function of the device which could cause incorrect readings. WARNINGS • Do not ignore symptoms that may be due to low or high blood glucose: If you are experiencing symptoms that are not consistent with your glucose readings, consult your health care professional. • Checking Sensor glucose readings with a blood glucose meter: Under the following conditions, Sensor glucose readings may not be accurate and you should conduct a fingerstick test using a blood glucose meter. You should not use Sensor glucose readings to make a diabetes treatment decision: • If you suspect that your reading may be inaccurate for any reason • When you are experiencing symptoms that may be due to low or high blood glucose

• When you are experiencing symptoms that do not match FreeStyle Libre System readings • During times of rapidly changing glucose (more than 2 mg/dL per minute), when interstitial fluid glucose levels as measured by the Sensor may not accurately reflect blood glucose levels • When the Sensor glucose reading does not include a Current Glucose number or Glucose Trend Arrow • In order to confirm hypoglycemia or impending hypoglycemia as reported by the Sensor • When you see the symbol, you must check your blood glucose with a blood glucose meter before making any treatment decisions. Sensor readings may not accurately reflect blood glucose levels. 92 mg dL 350 250 15050 2pm 6pm 10pm Glucose Going Low Glucose Going Low

• Hypoglycemic unawareness: The FreeStyle Libre System has not been evaluated for use in patients with hypoglycemic unawareness and will not automatically alert you of a hypoglycemic event without you scanning your Sensor. • No alarms without a Sensor scan: The FreeStyle Libre System does not have alarms that will automatically notify you when you are having a severe low (hypoglycemic) or high (hyperglycemic) glucose event unless you scan your Sensor. For example, the System does not have an alarm that can alert or wake you when you are sleeping in the case of low or high glucose. • Choking hazard: The FreeStyle Libre System contains small parts that may be dangerous if swallowed. Cautions and Limitations Below are important cautions and limitations to keep in mind so you can use the System safely. They are grouped into categories for easy reference. What to know about Alarms/Alerts: • There are NO alarms or alerts unless you scan the Sensor. What to know before using the System: • Review all product information before use. • Take standard precautions for transmission of blood borne pathogens to avoid contamination. Safety Information Important Safety Information Who should not use the Systems: • Do not use the System in people less than 18 years of age. The System is not approved for use in people under 18 years of age and Sensor readings in this population may be inaccurate. In general, continuous glucose monitoring systems are recognized to be less accurate in children than in adults. • Do not use the System in critically ill patients. The System is not approved for use in these patients. It is not known how different conditions or medications common to the critically ill population may affect performance of the System. Sensor glucose readings may be inaccurate in critically ill patients. • Do not use the System in pregnant women or persons on dialysis. The System is not approved for use in pregnant women or persons on dialysis and has not been evaluated in these populations. • Performance of the System when used with other implanted medical devices, such as pacemakers, has not been evaluated. What should you know about wearing a Sensor: • After the 12 hour start-up period, the Sensor can be worn for up to 10 days. • Some individuals may be sensitive to the adhesive that keeps the Sensor attached to the skin. If you notice significant skin irritation around or under your Sensor, remove the Sensor and stop using the FreeStyle Libre System. Contact your health care professional before continuing to use the FreeStyle Libre System. • Intense exercise may cause your Sensor to loosen due to sweat or movement of the Sensor. Remove and replace your Sensor if it starts to loosen and follow the instructions to select an appropriate application site. • Do not reuse Sensors. The Sensor and Sensor Applicator are designed for single use. Reuse may result in no glucose readings and infection. Not suitable for re-sterilization. Further exposure to irradiation may cause inaccurate results. • If a Sensor breaks inside your body, call your health care professional. How to Store the Sensor Kit: • Store the Sensor Kit between 39°F and 77°F. Storage outside of this range may cause inaccurate Sensor glucose readings. While you don’t need to keep your Sensor Kit in a refrigerator, you can as long as the refrigerator is between 39°F and 77°F. Do not freeze. • Store the Sensor Kit between 10-90% non-condensing humidity. When not to use the System: • Do NOT use if the Sensor Kit package, Sensor Pack, or Sensor Applicator appear to be damaged or already opened due to risk of no results and/or infection. • Do NOT use if Sensor Kit contents are past expiration date.

• Do NOT use if the Reader appears to be damaged due to risk of electric shock and/or no results. What to know before you Apply the Sensor • The Sensor Pack and Sensor Applicator are packaged as a set (separately from the Reader) and have the same Sensor code. Check that the Sensor codes match before using your Sensor Pack and Sensor Applicator. Do not use Sensor Packs and Sensor Applicators with different Sensor codes together as this will result in incorrect glucose readings. • Clean the application site and ensure that it is dry prior to Sensor insertion. This helps the Sensor stay attached to your body. • Clean hands prior to Sensor handling/insertion to help prevent infection. • Change the application site for the next Sensor application to prevent discomfort or skin irritation. CODE FreeStyle L Sensor Pa XXX XXXXXXXXX FreeStyle L Sensor Pa XXX XXXXXXXXX FreeStyle L Sensor Pa XXX XXXXXXXXX YYYY-MM-D

• Sensor placement is not approved for sites other than the back of the arm. If placed in other areas, the Sensor may not function properly. • Select an appropriate Sensor site to help the Sensor stay attached to the body and prevent discomfort or skin irritation. Avoid areas with scars, moles, stretch marks, or lumps. Select an area of skin that generally stays flat during normal daily activities (no bending or folding). Choose a site that is at least 1 inch away from an insulin injection site. Safety Information Important Safety Information When is Sensor Glucose different from Blood Glucose: • Physiological differences between the interstitial fluid and capillary blood may result in differences in glucose readings between the System and results from a fingerstick test using a blood glucose meter. Differences in glucose readings between interstitial fluid and capillary blood may be observed during times of rapid change in blood glucose, such as after eating, dosing insulin, or exercising. What to know about interfering substances such as Vitamin C and Aspirin: • Taking ascorbic acid (vitamin C) while wearing the Sensor may falsely raise Sensor glucose readings. Taking salicylic acid (used in some pain relievers such as aspirin and some skin care products) may slightly lower Sensor glucose readings. The level of inaccuracy depends on the amount of the interfering substance active in the body. • Test results did not indicate interference for methyldopa (used in some drugs to treat high blood pressure) or tolbutamide (infrequently used in some drugs to treat diabetes in the US) at maximum circulating levels. However, concentrations of potential interferents in interstitial fluid are unknown compared to circulating blood. What to know about X-Rays: • The Sensor should be removed prior to exposing it to an X-ray machine. The effect of X-rays on the performance of the System has not been evaluated. The exposure may damage the Sensor and may impact proper function of the device to detect trends and track patterns in glucose values during the wear period. When to remove the Sensor: • If the Sensor is becoming loose or if the Sensor tip is coming out of your skin, you may get no readings or unreliable readings, which may not match how you feel. Check to make sure your Sensor has not come loose. If it has come loose, remove it and apply a new one. • If you believe your glucose readings are not correct or are inconsistent with how you feel, perform a blood glucose test on your finger to confirm your glucose. If the problem continues, remove the current Sensor and apply a new one. What to do if you are dehydrated: • Severe dehydration and excessive water loss may cause inaccurate Sensor glucose readings. If you believe you are suffering from dehydration, consult your health care professional immediately. What to know about the Reader’s Built-in Meter: • The FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System has a built-in blood glucose meter that is designed to be used only with FreeStyle Precision Neo blood glucose test strips and MediSense Glucose and Ketone Control Solution. Using other test strips with the Reader’s built-in meter will produce an error or cause the Reader’s built-in meter to not turn on or start a test. The Reader’s built-in meter does not have ketone testing functionality. • The Reader’s built-in meter is not for use on people who are dehydrated, hypotensive, in shock, or for individuals in hyperglycemic-hyperosmolar state, with or without ketosis. • The Reader’s built-in meter is not for use on neonates, in critically-ill patients, or for diagnosis or screening of diabetes. • See Using the Reader’s Built-in meter section of the User’s Manual for additional important information on the use of the Reader’s built-in meter. Where to charge your Reader: • Be sure to select a location for charging that allows the power adapter to be easily unplugged. Do NOT block access to the charger due to the potential risk of electrical shock. Safety Information Getting to Know Your System

• The reader scans the sensor for glucose readings and stores up to 90 days of glucose history • The reader activates the sensor and initiates the 12-hour start-up period • The reader is rechargeable • The sensor is worn on the back of the upper arm and stores glucose readings every 15 minutes • Follow the instructions to prepare and apply the sensor • The sensor may be worn for up to 10 days with no routine fingersticks for calibration or insulin dosing* Reader Touch Screen Home Button USB Port See User’s Manual for instruction on setting up the reader for the first time. *Lancing is not required except when symptoms do not match glucose reading, when reader prompts a blood glucose test, or when glucose readings are not available with system. Your System Sensor Applicator

Sensor Pack Codes on labels must match Sensor Application 1 Assemble sensor and apply it to your body Sensor Application TIP: TIP: Select an area on the back of the upper arm that generally The area MUST be clean and dry stays flat during normal daily activities (no bending or folding). or the sensor may not stick to the site. STEP 4 TIP: Assemble on a hard surface, such as a table. STEP 7 TIP: For video of sensor application, visit myfreestyle.com/provider/resources STEP 1 Select site on back of upper arm. Do not use other sites as these are not approved and may result in inaccurate glucose readings. Note: Avoid scars, moles, stretch marks, lumps, and insulin injection sites. To prevent skin irritation, rotate sites between applications. Place sensor applicator over site and push down firmly to apply sensor. CAUTION: Do not push down on sensor applicator until placed over prepared site to prevent unintended results or injury. Line up dark mark on sensor applicator with dark mark on sensor pack. On a hard surface, press down firmly on sensor applicator until it comes to a stop and you hear an audible click. STEP 2 STEP 5 STEP 8 Clean site with alcohol wipe. Allow site to dry completely before proceeding. Lift sensor applicator straight out of sensor pack. Gently pull sensor applicator straight down and away from your body. STEP 6 STEP 9 STEP 3 Make sure sensor is secure by gently pressing adhesive to the skin. Discard used sensor applicator and sensor pack according to local regulations. Sensor applicator is ready to apply sensor. CAUTION: Sensor applicator now contains a needle. Do not touch inside sensor applicator or put it back into sensor pack. Peel lid completely off sensor pack. Unscrew cap from sensor applicator. CAUTION: Sensor codes must match on sensor pack and sensor applicator or glucose readings will be incorrect.

Start New Sensor 2 Start new sensor with reader STEP 3 STEP 4 STEP 1 STEP 1 STEP 2 STEP 2 STEP 2 During the 12-hour start-up, check your blood glucose as your health care professional recommends. NOTE: You can use the reader’s built-in meter to check your blood glucose with FreeStyle Precision Neo test strips. Press Home Button to turn on reader. NOTE: If using reader for the first time, follow the prompts to set date, time, and target glucose range. 10:23pm 10:23pm No Active Sensor No Active Sensor Start New Sensor Start New Sensor Review History Review History Review History Touch Start New Sensor. Touch Start New Sensor. Touch Start New Sensor. Touch Start New Sensor. Hold reader within 1.5 inches (4 cm) of sensor to scan it. Sensor can be used to check your glucose after 12 hours. Hold reader within 1.5 inches (4 cm) of sensor to scan it. Sensor can be used to check your glucose after 12 hours. Hold reader within 1.5 inches (4 cm) of sensor to scan it. Sensor can be used to check your glucose after 12 hours. Hold reader within 1.5 inches (4 cm) of sensor to scan it. Sensor can be used to check your glucose after 12 hours. Hold reader within 1.5 inches (4 cm) of sensor to scan it. Sensor can be used to check your glucose after 12 hours. Hold reader within 1.5 inches (4 cm) of sensor to scan it. Sensor can be used to check your glucose after 12 hours. Hold reader within 1.5 inches (4 cm) of sensor to scan it. Sensor can be used to check your glucose after 12 hours. Hold reader within 1.5 inches (4 cm) of sensor to scan it. Sensor can be used to check your glucose after 12 hours.

After the 12 hour start-up period, the sensor can be worn for up to 10 days. Your sensor automatically stops working after 10 days of data and must be replaced. Start New Sensor Accessing Your Glucose Data You can scan to get a real-time glucose reading anytime. The reader stores up to 90 days of data. Check your glucose Adding notes Select the checkbox next to the information you’d like to add. Options include insulin, food, exercise, and any medication you take. Glucose Going High 350 250 15050236 mgdL 6am 10am2 pm STEP 1 From the Glucose Reading screen, add a note by touching the in the upper right corner of the screen. Add Notes OK Rapid-Acting Insulin +Long-Acting Insulin +Food +1 / 4 STEP 3 Press Home Button to turn on reader OR touch Check Glucose from the Home Screen. STEP 2 OK Add Notes Rapid-Acting Insulin Long-Acting Insulin Food 1 / 4 Hold reader within 1.5 inches (4 cm) of sensor to scan it. NOTE: If the sensor is not successfully scanned within 15 seconds, the reader displays a prompt to scan the sensor again. Touch OK to return to the Home Screen and touch Check Glucose to scan your sensor. Touch OK to save your notes. Notes are viewable in the logbook. Getting Glucose Data Glucose Going High 350 250 15050236 mgdL 6am 10am 2pm Reader shows your glucose reading along with your glucose graph and an arrow indicating the direction your glucose is going. Review Your History The reader provides insightful information to identify 7-, 14-, 30-, and 90-day trends. Average Glucose OK Information about Daily Graph OK Sensor glucose Daily Patterns OK The pattern and Average: 119 mg/dLthe average sensor glucose (mg/dL)readings by day2 (mg/dL) variability of your 350 350 sensor glucose 121 152 134 readings1 250 150250 over a typical day2,3,4 15069 50 50 am 12am 6 pm 12 pm 6 am 12 12612612 12612612am am pm pm am am am pm pm am Last 7 Days 22 Feb Wednesday Last 7 Days Low Glucose OK The number of Sensor Usage OK Report on how OK The percentage of Events low glucose often you scan time glucose events measured Scans Per Day 3 the sensor Sensor captured data 81%34%readings were 54% 12% Time In Target Total Events: 10 Above 6 In Target above, below, or 3 1 0 am 12am 6 pm 12 pm 6 am 12 Belowwithin Target Glucose Range1 Target Range 100-140 mg/dL Last 7 Days Last 7 Days Last 7 Days 1. Readings above or below your Target Glucose Range are orange, while readings in range are blue. 2. The thick black line shows the median (midpoint) of your glucose readings. 3. The gray shading represents a range (10-90 percentiles) of your sensor readings. This is not the Ambulatory Glucose Profile. 4. Daily Patterns needs at least 5 days of glucose data. Glucose History STEP 1 STEP 3 Press Home Button to turn on the reader and go to Home Screen. STEP 2 Review History 10:23pm Ends in 10 days Logbook Daily Graph Check Average Glucose Glucose 1 / 2 Review History Touch Review History. Daily Patterns Time In Target Low Glucose Events Sensor Usage Use the arrows to view the available options. Maintenance and Disposal Your sensor automatically stops working after 10 days of data is collected and must be replaced. You should also replace your sensor if you notice any irritation or discomfort at the application site or if the reader reports a problem with the sensor currently in use. Discard the used sensor in accordance with all applicable local regulations related to the disposal of electronic equipment, batteries, and materials potentially exposed to body fluids. *Clorox Healthcare Bleach Germicidal Wipes may be purchased at major online retailers, such as Walmart.com, Amazon.com, and OfficeDepot.com. Maintenance & Disposal Pull up the edge of the adhesive that keeps the sensor attached to the skin. Slowly peel away from the skin in one motion. If you removed your last sensor before it ended, you will be prompted to confirm that you would like to start a new sensor when you first scan it. When you are ready to apply a new sensor, follow the instructions previously outlined. NOTE: Any remaining adhesive residue on the skin can be removed with warm soapy water or isopropyl alcohol. You should clean and disinfect the reader once a week. Use Clorox Healthcare Bleach Germicidal Wipes.* NOTE: Turn off the reader before you clean and disinfect it. For cleaning, wipe outside surfaces of the reader with one bleach wipe. For disinfection, use a second bleach wipe to wipe outside surfaces of the reader until surfaces are wet. NOTE: Make sure liquid does not get into the test strip and USB ports. Allow the reader surfaces to remain wet for 60 seconds. After 1 full minute, immediately dry with a clean paper towel to remove any residual moisture. When finished, thoroughly wash your hands with soap and water. Interpreting Sensor Readings Sensor glucose readings appear after using the reader to scan your sensor. Before making treatment decisions, it is important to understand your sensor readings. Use all of the information on the screen when deciding what to do or what treatment decision to make. Glucose Graph NOTE: While sensor glucose readings are gathered in the system range of 40-500 mg/dL, the graph display range is 0-350 mg/dL for ease of review on screen. Glucose readings above 350 mg/dL are displayed at 350 mg/dL. NOTE: The symbol may appear, indicating the reader time was changed. Gaps in the graph may result or glucose readings may be hidden. Sensor Readings Message Touch for more information Glucose Graph of your current and stored glucose readings ings Check Blood Glucose When you see this symbol, do a blood glucose test Trend Arrow Check Blo Food Note Rapid-Acting Rapid-Acting When Add Notes Direction your glucose is going Insulin Insulin Note Note symbo Glucose Going Low Touch to Glucose Trend glucose to add reading notes Arrow Arrow What it means Glucose rising quickly Glucose rising Target Current Current Current Current Glucose Glucose Glucose changing slowly Glucose Range 2pm Glucose Glucose 6pm 10pm Target Glucose Range Glucose from your latest scan Glucose falling Time Glucose falling quickly When Glucose you Check Blood see this symbol, do a blood glucose test before making treatment decisions Glucose mg/dL 350 250 350 Low 92 92 Going mgdL 150250 50 150502pm 6pm 10pm 2pm 6pm 10pm 350 250 15050 92 mg dL Trend Arrows The Glucose Trend Arrow indicates which direction your glucose is going. Glucose is rising quickly (more than 2 mg/dL per minute) Glucose is rising (between 1 and 2 mg/dL per minute) Glucose is changing slowly (less than 1 mg/dL per minute) Glucose is falling (between 1 and 2 mg/dL per minute) Glucose is falling quickly (more than 2 mg/dL per minute) NOTE: The Glucose Trend Arrow may not always appear with your reading. When there is no Glucose Trend Arrow, the system can’t tell if your glucose is rising quickly or falling quickly and will display the symbol. Whenever you see this symbol, you should do a blood glucose test and treat based on that result. Sensor Readings Going High/Low Reading Messages will appear on the FreeStyle Libre Reader when glucose readings are trending.

If your glucose is projected to be higher than 240 mg/dL or lower than 70 mg/dL within 15 minutes, a message will appear on the screen. Touch the message button for more information and set a reminder to check your glucose again. Sensor Readings Glucose Going Low 72 mgdL 350 Glucose Going High 237 mgdL Glucose Going High 237 mgdL Glucose Going High 237 mgdL 350 If your glucose reading is less than 70 mg/dL, projected to be less than 70 mg/dL, rapidly changing, or there is no number or trend arrow, you will see this symbol . You can touch the symbol for more information. Check your blood glucose on your finger with a test strip before making treatment decisions. If your glucose reading is less than 70 mg/dL, projected to be less than 70 mg/dL, rapidly changing, or there is no number or trend arrow, you will see this symbol . You can touch the symbol for more information. Check your blood glucose on your finger with a test strip before making treatment decisions. If your glucose reading is less than 70 mg/dL, projected to be less than 70 mg/dL, rapidly changing, or there is no number or trend arrow, you will see this symbol . You can touch the symbol for more information. Check your blood glucose on your finger with a test strip before making treatment decisions. 250 150502pm6 m6 pm 10pm DISPLAY WHAT TO DO 250 150502pm6 m6 150502pm6 m6 pm 10pm pm 10pm pm 10pm If your glucose reading is less than 70 mg/dL, projected to be less than 70 mg/dL, rapidly changing, or there is no number or trend arrow, you will see this symbol . You can touch the symbol for more information. Check your blood glucose on your finger with a test strip before making treatment decisions. If your glucose reading is less than 70 mg/dL, projected to be less than 70 mg/dL, rapidly changing, or there is no number or trend arrow, you will see this symbol . You can touch the symbol for more information. Check your blood glucose on your finger with a test strip before making treatment decisions. If your glucose reading is less than 70 mg/dL, projected to be less than 70 mg/dL, rapidly changing, or there is no number or trend arrow, you will see this symbol . You can touch the symbol for more information. Check your blood glucose on your finger with a test strip before making treatment decisions. If your glucose reading is less than 70 mg/dL, projected to be less than 70 mg/dL, rapidly changing, or there is no number or trend arrow, you will see this symbol . You can touch the symbol for more information. Check your blood glucose on your finger with a test strip before making treatment decisions. If your glucose reading is less than 70 mg/dL, projected to be less than 70 mg/dL, rapidly changing, or there is no number or trend arrow, you will see this symbol . You can touch the symbol for more information. Check your blood glucose on your finger with a test strip before making treatment decisions. If your glucose reading is less than 70 mg/dL, projected to be less than 70 mg/dL, rapidly changing, or there is no number or trend arrow, you will see this symbol . You can touch the symbol for more information. Check your blood glucose on your finger with a test strip before making treatment decisions.

High/Low Reading Messages will appear on the FreeStyle Libre Reader when the glucose reading is high or low. Sensor Readings WHAT DISPLAY TO DO If your glucose is higher than 240 mg/dL or lower than 70 mg/dL, you will see a message on the screen. You can touch the message button for more information and set a reminder to check your glucose. If your glucose reading is less than 70 mg/dL, projected to be less than 70 mg/dL, rapidly changing, or there is no number or trend arrow, you will see this symbol . You can touch the symbol for more information. Check your blood glucose on your finger with a test strip before making treatment decisions. Low Glucose 63 mgdL 350 250 150502pm 6pm 10pm Low Glucose 63 mgdL 350 250 150502pm 6pm 10pm

HI/LO Reading Current Glucose will display HI or LO when glucose readings are outside measuring range. Sensor Readings 350 250 150502pm 6pm 10pm Low GlucoseLO WHAT DISPLAY TO DO If LO appears on the reader, your reading is lower than 40 mg/dL. If HI appears on the reader, your reading is higher than 500 mg/dL. You can touch the message button for more mgdL information. Check your blood glucose on your finger with a test strip. If you get a second LO or HI result, contact your health care professional immediately. If your glucose reading is less than 70 mg/dL, projected to be less than 70 mg/dL, rapidly changing, or there is no number or trend arrow, you will see this symbol . You can touch the symbol for more information. Check your blood glucose on your finger with a test strip before making treatment decisions. 350 250 150502pm 6pm 10pm High GlucoseHI mgdL

Treatment Decisions–Getting Started Before you start using the FreeStyle Libre System for treatment decisions, make sure you have a good understanding of how the system works for your body. • Continue to use your blood glucose meter for treatment decisions until you are comfortable with the information you receive • Getting familiar with the system could take days, weeks, or even months • Work with your health care professional to put together a plan for making treatment decisions • Scan often to see how carbs, medication, exercise, illness, or stress levels impact your sensor glucose readings HELPFUL TIPS m6 Treatment Decisions CONFIRM SENSOR GLUCOSE READINGS Confirm your Sensor glucose readings with a blood glucose meter until you understand: • Sensor accuracy may vary between sensors • Sensor accuracy may vary during a sensor wear session • Sensor accuracy may vary in different situations (meals, exercise, first day of use, etc.) 350 UNDERSTAND YOUR INSULIN 250 Understand how your insulin works, including how long it takes to start working and how long 150it lasts in your body. 502pm6 pm 10pm NOTE: Making a treatment decision doesn’t just mean taking insulin. Treatment decisions can include taking fast-acting carbs, eating, or doing nothing and scanning again later. AVOID “INSULIN STACKING” If your glucose is high and going up, your first instinct may be to take more insulin to lower your glucose. However, depending on when you last took insulin or your recent activity, the right treatment decision may be to do nothing and scan again later.

Treatment Decisions–When Not to Use Sensor Readings Treatment Decisions Glucose is Falling Quickly or Rising Quickly Whenever Interstitial fluid can be different from blood glucose levels, particularly during times when your blood glucose is changing quickly, for example, after eating, taking insulin, or exercising. you see this symbol, Low Glucose or Glucose Going Low Message Low sensor glucose readings may not accurately reflect blood glucose. do a blood No Glucose Trend Arrow glucose test When there is no Glucose Trend Arrow, the system can’t tell if your glucose is rising quickly and treat or falling quickly. based on that result! No Current Glucose Number When there is no Current Glucose number, such as when you receive an error message or a LO or HI result, you don’t have enough information to make a treatment decision. You Think Your Readings Are Incorrect Don’t trust sensor glucose readings that you think may be incorrect or that don’t match what you would expect based on your recent activity. For example, if you ate dinner but forgot to take insulin before eating, you would expect your glucose to be high. If your glucose reading is low, then it doesn’t match your recent activity. Don’t make treatment decisions if you think your sensor glucose readings are incorrect. NOTE: The symbol will NOT display in these situations. You Have Low or High Blood Glucose Symptoms Don’t ignore symptoms that may be due to low or high blood glucose. Do a blood glucose test and treat based on that result. Symptoms Don’t Match Reading There may be times when your symptoms don’t match your sensor glucose readings. You may feel shaky, sweaty, and dizzy—symptoms you generally get when you have low glucose—but your glucose is within your target range. Don’t ignore symptoms that may be due to low or high blood glucose. NOTE: The symbol will NOT display in these situations. Low Glucose Rising Quickly Blood Glucose 100 mg/dL Glucose Sensor Glucose Falling 95 mg/dL Quickly GlucoseLO Sensor Glucose 80 mg/dL Blood Glucose 70 mg/dL 350 Low GlucoseLO mgdL

Treatment Decisions–Glucose Trend Arrows This table provides some information on how you can factor the Glucose Trend Arrow into your treatment decisions. Remember that you should never make a treatment decision based on the Glucose Trend Arrow alone. Glucose Trend Arrow TREATMENT DECISION CONSIDERATIONS Low Glucose (< 70 mg/dL) Glucose in Target Range High Glucose (> 240 mg/dL) No Arrow or No Number You will see the symbol. Do not treat based on sensor glucose reading. Do a blood glucose test. You will see the symbol. Do not treat based on sensor glucose reading. Do a blood glucose test. You will see the symbol. Do not treat based on sensor glucose reading. Do a blood glucose test. If you are about to eat, take insulin to cover your meal. Consider taking a little more since glucose is high and rising. If this is between meals, consider taking an insulin correction dose, unless you have taken insulin recently. If you have taken insulin recently, do nothing and scan again later. Avoid “insulin stacking.” You will see the symbol. Do not treat based on sensor glucose reading. Do a blood glucose test. If you are about to eat, take insulin to cover your meal. Consider taking a little more since glucose is rising. If you have taken insulin recently, do nothing and scan again later. Avoid “insulin stacking.” If you are about to eat, take insulin to cover your meal. Consider taking a little more since glucose is high. If this is between meals, consider taking an insulin correction dose, unless you have taken insulin recently. If you have taken insulin recently, do nothing and scan again later. Avoid “insulin stacking.” You will see the symbol. Do not treat based on sensor glucose reading. Do a blood glucose test. If you are about to eat, take insulin to cover your meal. If this is between meals, do nothing and scan again later. If you are about to eat, take insulin to cover If you are about to eat, take insulin to cover your meal. Consider taking a little less since glucose is falling. your meal. Consider taking a little less since glucose is falling. If this is between meals, consider eating a snack or fast-acting carbohydrates to stay If this is between meals, consider doing nothing and scan again later. within target and scan again later. Avoid “insulin stacking.” You will see the symbol. Do not treat based on sensor glucose reading. Do a blood glucose test. Treatment Decisions

Treatment Decisions–Example Scenarios Example scenarios to help you understand how to use all of the information on the screen. The recommendations below are based on a clinical article published in a peer reviewed journal. CLAIRE WHAT CLAIRE SEES WHAT CLAIRE DOES Claire has a target After breakfast After breakfast, Claire sees of 100 mg/dL and a her glucose is 250 mg/dL. correction factor of The trend arrow shows it is 1:50. This means she going down quickly. There is would take 1 unit of also a message at rapid-acting insulin the top of the screen and to lower her glucose the symbol. about 50 mg/dL. Treatment Decisions Anytime Claire sees the symbol, she does a blood glucose test before deciding what to do. Before lunch Claire sees her glucose is 250 mg/dL and rising. Before eating lunch, Claire takes enough insulin to cover the meal and a little more since her trend arrow was rising . After lunch Ninety minutes later, Claire’s glucose is still 250 mg/dL. The graph shows her glucose is still rising and so does the trend arrow . Claire does not take a correction dose as it is within 2 hours of her meal dose. This could result in “insulin stacking” and low glucose. The insulin she took for her meal may not have reached its full effect. Claire decides to wait and scan again later. Before dinner Claire sees her current glucose is 250 mg/dL. The graph shows that her glucose is going down and so does the trend arrow . Claire considers what might be causing her glucose to go down and what she might do to prevent a low glucose. She considers how much insulin she should take before her meal. Because For more scenarios, consult she sees she considers your FreeStyle Libre System User Guide. taking a little less insulin. *This method was based on: Pettus J., Edelman S.V. Recommendations for using Real-Time Continuous Glucose Monitoring (rtCGM) Data for Insulin Adjustments in Type 1 Diabetes. Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology. 2017;11:138-147. High Glucose Claire adds 50 mg/dL because of the rising trend arrow* Claire subtracts 50 mg/dL because of the falling trend arrow* 250 + 50 Claire subtracts her target number 300 - 100 Claire divides by her correction factor 200 ÷ 50 Claire takes 4 units of insulin = 4 250 - 50 Claire subtracts her target number 200 - 100 Claire divides by her correction factor 100 ÷ 50 Claire takes 2 units of insulin = 2

When to Contact your Health Care Professional As instructed by the FreeStyle Libre labeling Symptoms • If you are experiencing symptoms that are not consistent with your glucose readings • If you have significant skin irritation around the sensor • If the sensor breaks in your body • If you are suffering from dehydration • If bleeding does not stop after removing sensor Treatment Decisions • To determine how you should use your sensor glucose information to help manage your diabetes • To determine and set your target glucose range • To understand how insulin works • To determine when to do nothing/scan again later • To determine how to use your blood glucose results • To discuss what to do if symptoms don’t match your blood glucose results

Sensor Readings • If you get a LO or HI sensor reading followed by a LO or HI blood glucose result Low GlucoseLO mgdL mgdL • If you are not sure about the reader message or the glucose reading Maintenance and Disposal 350 250 150502pm 6pm 10pm

• How to discard a used sensor Contact HCP Frequently Asked Questions Sensor Application How is the sensor applied to the body? The sensor is applied to the back of the upper arm with a simple, disposable device called an applicator. When the sensor is applied, a small (5mm) filament is inserted just under the skin, and held in place with a small adhesive pad. Most patients don’t feel pain when applying the FreeStyle Libre sensor.* Is it necessary to apply a sensor in a different location if I feel discomfort or in case of a mis-application? To prevent discomfort or skin irritation, you should select a different site other than the one most recently used. When applying the sensor to my arm, do I need to stretch or pinch the skin? No, there is no need to stretch or pinch the skin to apply the sensor. The sensor should be applied only on the back of your upper arm. Avoid areas with scars, moles, stretch marks, or lumps. Select an area of skin that generally stays flat during normal daily activities (no bending or folding). Choose a site that is at least 2.5 cm (1 inch) away from an insulin injection site. To prevent discomfort or skin irritation, you should select a different site other than the one most recently used. For more information please refer to the FreeStyle Libre User’s Manual. Patient Wear Will the user feel the sensor while wearing it? The portion of the sensor that gets inserted under the skin is less than 0.4 millimeter wide (1mm is about the thickness of a few strands of human hair) and it’s inserted only about 5mm under the skin, so most people will not feel the sensor while it is being worn.* Were there any skin reactions reported by patients wearing FreeStyle Libre sensors? Mild skin irritations, such as erythema, edema, rash, bleeding, itching, induration, and infection were reported around the insertion site and adhesive area by a moderate frequency of subjects (5 out of 48 or 10.4%).* Can users bathe, shower, swim or exercise while wearing a sensor? Yes. The sensor can be worn while bathing, showering, swimming or exercise. The sensor should not be taken below 1 meter of water (3 feet), and should not be submerged in water for more than 30 minutes. The adhesive is designed to keep the sensor securely and comfortably in place for up to 10 days after the start-up period. How long can the sensor be worn? The disposable sensor is designed to adhere to the back of the upper arm and provide accurate glucose readings for up to 10 days after the start-up period. After the 10 days, the user removes the sensor by peeling off the adhesive pad. How do you remove the sensor? Pull up the edge of the adhesive that keeps the sensor attached to the skin. Slowly peel away from the skin in one motion. Note: Any remaining adhesive residue on the skin can be removed with warm soapy water or isopropyl alcohol. What if the user needs to remove the sensor before 10 days (or if it falls off)? Users should remove the sensor and start a new sensor. The reader will identify that it is a new sensor and ask users if they want to start it. If a sensor falls off before 10 days have completed, then the user should call Customer Service at 1-855-632-8658. * Data on file. Abbott Diabetes Care. FAQs FreeStyle, Libre and related brand marks are trademarks of Abbott Diabetes Care Inc. in various jurisdictions. ©2017 Abbott. ADC-05821 v2.0 10/17


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